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Bachelor of Human Services

The Bachelor of Human Services is designed to provide graduates with a comprehensive and broad theoretical base of knowledge of human service principles and skills preparing them for work with diverse clientele across a variety of welfare settings in private, government and non-government organisations.

AIPC’s Bachelor of Human Services provides a flexible and affordable alternative to traditional tertiary education.

There has never been a better time for you to further develop your qualifications. Qualified human services professionals are in high demand in Australia. With a tertiary qualification, you’ll be assisting your community with the security of knowing there are many opportunities for employment.

Our tertiary students come from a variety of backgrounds. Some are seeking to move into a more rewarding profession and sector, while others are looking to deepen their skills and knowledge as an adjunct to their core profession. While others are looking to supplement their vocational qualification with a tertiary qualification.

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Icon-Course-Delivery Course Delivery

Online, Full-time, Part-time

Icon-Duration Duration

36 months (full time)

Icon-Units Structure

22 Units

You can apply for entry to the Bachelor of Human Services course if you have achieved one of the following:

  • Icon-Small-Tick A nationally recognised Diploma from any field of study; or
  • Icon-Small-Tick completed Year 12 or Higher School Certificate with at least a Sound Achievement in English; or
  • Icon-Small-Tick completed a year-long tertiary studies preparation program (eg Certificate IV in Adult Tertiary Preparation); or
  • Icon-Small-Tick completed at least 12 months of tertiary studies with a University or non-university Higher Education Provider with a GPA of at least 4.0; or
  • Icon-Small-Tick achieved an overall score of at least 160, or
  • Icon-Small-Tick a verbal subscore of at least 155, in the Special Tertiary Admissions Test (STAT).
  • Icon-Small-Tick FEE-HELP is a loan scheme for eligible students to pay their tuition (subject) fees.
  • Icon-Small-Tick Pay your subject fees direct to the institute each semester for each subject in which you are enrolled.
  • Icon-Small-Tick Split Payments. This means you can pay a portion of your subject fees yourself, and the remaining portion using FEE-HELP (if elgible).
  • Icon-Small-Tick Pay via Credit Card or Direct Debit.

Request a Course Guide

Please complete this form and we will respond within 24 working hours.

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Why study our Bachelor of Human Services

Our Bachelor of Human Services provides a flexible and affordable alternative to traditional tertiary education.

0 Career ready

When you graduate, you will be extremely well prepared to pursue a career in counselling – employed or self-employed – enjoying our strong industry reputation and linkage.

1 Extremely applicable

This course is extremely applicable to people from all sorts of backgrounds. Whether you are seeking a fresh start in a rewarding profession; or want to acquire counselling skills as an adjunct to your core profession – such as teachers, nurses, ministers of religion, corrective services officers and administrators.

2 Counselling education specialists

We believe you're better off learning from a specialist than a generalist. Many training providers deliver courses across a variety of industries. At AIPC, we prefer to concentrate on counselling and community services education.

3 Flexible learning

With so many demands on our time it can be difficult to fit study in around other commitments, that's why our Bachelor of Human Services has been designed to maximise your learning from home where you can progress through your studies in a full-time or part-time pace.

Course Outline

SEMESTER
UNIT CODE
TITLE
PREREQUISITE
Scholarship: Academic Writing & Study Skills is a core first-year subject that introduces students to the important area of academic writing and to develop essential skills to meet the demands of a degree program and beyond. Successful completion of this subject develops the skills and knowledge required to write academic essays and literature reviews according to APA guidelines. Student will learn the importance of academic integrity and appropriate referencing conventions.
This first-year, first semester subject provides students with an introduction to the theory and frameworks of human service practice. Students begin with the history of human service practice including the establishment of welfare provision, the role of government and non-government providers and the nature of human services including diversity, disadvantage and inequality. Students explore the role of self and identify strengths important to the human service professional.
Case Management in Human Services is a first-year subject introducing students to different models of case management commonly used in human service practice. Students develop awareness of various case management approaches and critically analyse the application of approaches to both simple and complex client issues. The subject encourages students to recognise the role of the individual, family and community in the understanding and application of intervention strategies.
Communication Skills is a core subject that examines the crucial role and application of communication skills to participate in a range of personal and professional environments. Students develop communication skills to facilitate and enhance sound understanding and mutual respect between peers, colleagues and superiors in a range of contexts.
SEMESTER
UNIT CODE
TITLE
PREREQUISITE
Group Work is a core, first-year subject introducing students to theoretical principles and processes of group work and team dynamics. Diversity and the effect on group and team cohesion are emphasised. This subject sets a solid theoretical foundation for understanding the functioning of teams and groups across different contexts, and also provides key theoretical models which students can operationalise through participation in group projects and future practice across a range of professions.
Social Frameworks is a core, first-year subject providing students with knowledge to study real world issues through the application of sociological frameworks. Various theoretical perspectives are explored and applied to contemporary issues to ensure students understand the social structures and issues impacting on individuals and groups within society.
Micro-counselling skills are essential for many professionals, particularly those working within the human services area. This subject explores the application of the key counselling micro-skills to therapeutic practice. Students demonstrate all key skills in role-play scenarios and are assessed on their ability to integrate these skills into a helping/counselling interview.
Contemporary Human Rights is designed to provide students with a broad introductory knowledge of human rights and the relevance of human rights to human services and welfare. The subject covers the history of human rights with reference to International and National human rights instruments and encourages students to examine and critically reflect on human rights concerns relating to women, indigenous peoples and minority groups.
SEMESTER
UNIT CODE
TITLE
PREREQUISITE
Scholarship: Academic Writing & Study Skills is a core first-year subject that introduces students to the important area of academic writing and to develop essential skills to meet the demands of a degree program and beyond. Successful completion of this subject develops the skills and knowledge required to write academic essays and literature reviews according to APA guidelines. Student will learn the importance of academic integrity and appropriate referencing conventions.
This first-year, first semester subject provides students with an introduction to the theory and frameworks of human service practice. Students begin with the history of human service practice including the establishment of welfare provision, the role of government and non-government providers and the nature of human services including diversity, disadvantage and inequality. Students explore the role of self and identify strengths important to the human service professional.
Case Management in Human Services is a first-year subject introducing students to different models of case management commonly used in human service practice. Students develop awareness of various case management approaches and critically analyse the application of approaches to both simple and complex client issues. The subject encourages students to recognise the role of the individual, family and community in the understanding and application of intervention strategies.
Communication Skills is a core subject that examines the crucial role and application of communication skills to participate in a range of personal and professional environments. Students develop communication skills to facilitate and enhance sound understanding and mutual respect between peers, colleagues and superiors in a range of contexts.
Group Work is a core, first-year subject introducing students to theoretical principles and processes of group work and team dynamics. Diversity and the effect on group and team cohesion are emphasised. This subject sets a solid theoretical foundation for understanding the functioning of teams and groups across different contexts, and also provides key theoretical models which students can operationalise through participation in group projects and future practice across a range of professions.
Social Frameworks is a core, first-year subject providing students with knowledge to study real world issues through the application of sociological frameworks. Various theoretical perspectives are explored and applied to contemporary issues to ensure students understand the social structures and issues impacting on individuals and groups within society.
Micro-counselling skills are essential for many professionals, particularly those working within the human services area. This subject explores the application of the key counselling micro-skills to therapeutic practice. Students demonstrate all key skills in role-play scenarios and are assessed on their ability to integrate these skills into a helping/counselling interview.
Contemporary Human Rights is designed to provide students with a broad introductory knowledge of human rights and the relevance of human rights to human services and welfare. The subject covers the history of human rights with reference to International and National human rights instruments and encourages students to examine and critically reflect on human rights concerns relating to women, indigenous peoples and minority groups.
SEMESTER
UNIT CODE
TITLE
PREREQUISITE
This subject develops a reflective and analytical understanding of ethical and legal frameworks in a human services context. Students examine relevant ethical theories, relevant laws and ethical codes in relation to real-life examples from human service practice. Students develop an understanding of the legal and ethical responsibilities of human service work, analyse dilemmas from the perspective of best practice and develop an appreciation of their personal and professional values in shaping their responses to situations in human service practice.
Family and Society is a second-year subject designed to provide students with a better understanding of family against the construct of society. Students are encouraged to critically reflect on the role society plays in the development and function of the family and examine the diversity of family life in Australia. Students develop an understanding of the role of the family as a support mechanism, as well as the development and impact of governmental policies on families and how this informs human service practice.
This subject encourages reflection on personal experiences, values and beliefs within the context of human services practice. Students are required to analyse the use of reflection to understanding themselves, the client, and the therapeutic relationship with a focus on how reflection can facilitate ongoing development and effectiveness as a professional. This subject teaches the value of reflective practice and provides foundational reflective skills for incorporation into future learnings in the second and third years of study.
Developmental Psychology I: Childhood and Adolescence is a core second-year subject examining the broad theoretical domain of development from infancy to adolescence. Various aspects of physical, cognitive, social and emotional development are examined through reviewing theoretical and empirical data pertaining to specific areas of research and topics in the area. This subject complements the content of Developmental Psychology II: Adulthood and Aging which examines physical, cognitive, social and emotional development from early adulthood onwards.
SEMESTER
UNIT CODE
TITLE
PREREQUISITE
Developmental Psychology II: Adulthood and Aging is a core second-year subject that examines the physical, cognitive, social and emotional development from early adulthood and beyond. This subject includes a focus on the psychology of aging as well as issues of death, dying and bereavement. Theoretical and empirical research pertaining to specific areas of mid-life are also critically examined and students are required to critically evaluate research on a selected area of focus.
Family and Couple Counselling is a second-year subject that introduces interpersonal and systemic approaches for working with couples and families. This subject examines major theoretical concepts and therapeutic processes of family and couple counselling, helps to develop understanding of the dynamics of intimate relationships, and helps build the skills and confidence required to work with interpersonal issues.
This subject provides opportunity to work in the human service industry, gaining experience with, and exposure to practical issues. Students develop assessment and intervention skills and explore their own practice framework under the guidance and supervision of an experienced practitioner.
SEMESTER
UNIT CODE
TITLE
PREREQUISITE
This subject develops a reflective and analytical understanding of ethical and legal frameworks in a human services context. Students examine relevant ethical theories, relevant laws and ethical codes in relation to real-life examples from human service practice. Students develop an understanding of the legal and ethical responsibilities of human service work, analyse dilemmas from the perspective of best practice and develop an appreciation of their personal and professional values in shaping their responses to situations in human service practice.
Family and Society is a second-year subject designed to provide students with a better understanding of family against the construct of society. Students are encouraged to critically reflect on the role society plays in the development and function of the family and examine the diversity of family life in Australia. Students develop an understanding of the role of the family as a support mechanism, as well as the development and impact of governmental policies on families and how this informs human service practice.
This subject encourages reflection on personal experiences, values and beliefs within the context of human services practice. Students are required to analyse the use of reflection to understanding themselves, the client, and the therapeutic relationship with a focus on how reflection can facilitate ongoing development and effectiveness as a professional. This subject teaches the value of reflective practice and provides foundational reflective skills for incorporation into future learnings in the second and third years of study.
Developmental Psychology I: Childhood and Adolescence is a core second-year subject examining the broad theoretical domain of development from infancy to adolescence. Various aspects of physical, cognitive, social and emotional development are examined through reviewing theoretical and empirical data pertaining to specific areas of research and topics in the area. This subject complements the content of Developmental Psychology II: Adulthood and Aging which examines physical, cognitive, social and emotional development from early adulthood onwards.
Developmental Psychology II: Adulthood and Aging is a core second-year subject that examines the physical, cognitive, social and emotional development from early adulthood and beyond. This subject includes a focus on the psychology of aging as well as issues of death, dying and bereavement. Theoretical and empirical research pertaining to specific areas of mid-life are also critically examined and students are required to critically evaluate research on a selected area of focus.
Family and Couple Counselling is a second-year subject that introduces interpersonal and systemic approaches for working with couples and families. This subject examines major theoretical concepts and therapeutic processes of family and couple counselling, helps to develop understanding of the dynamics of intimate relationships, and helps build the skills and confidence required to work with interpersonal issues.
This subject provides opportunity to work in the human service industry, gaining experience with, and exposure to practical issues. Students develop assessment and intervention skills and explore their own practice framework under the guidance and supervision of an experienced practitioner.
SEMESTER
UNIT CODE
TITLE
PREREQUISITE
This subject provides an understanding of how to apply the strengths-based approach to facilitate change in children, adolescents and their families. This approach can harness individual and collective resources, facilitate change and empower families to shift ineffective behavioural patterns. This third-year subject builds on previous studies in first and second year and assists students to develop their personal approach to working with this client group.
In this third-year subject students critically develop awareness, knowledge and understanding of issues relating to culture, diversity and social justice in their role as human service workers. Drawing on knowledge gained in first and second year in regard to basic human rights, students consider the dimensions of diversity and culture and examine social justice practices in human services with the challenge to develop sensitive, inclusive and equitable solutions to identified issues.
Group Processes for Human Services draws on knowledge gained in first year CORE103 Group Work and further develops understanding of group work processes within a human services framework. Human service professionals frequently work with groups or teams on community, organisation and professional levels and the ability to facilitate and competently work within group situations is imperative. Students investigate the nature of organisational systems and small group processes exploring the benefits of working with clients in group situations and the value of collaborative teamwork.
An awareness and understanding of social policy and its impact on the citizens of a society is essential for human service professionals. In Social Policy, students explore the history of social policy development in Australia and engage in analysis of contemporary policy debates. Students learn how social policy is developed and the role of community and government in the process. Students develop the ability to critically analyse policy issues and debates using policy principles and demonstrate understanding of the differences and similarities of social policy in Australia and other Westernised countries.
SEMESTER
UNIT CODE
TITLE
PREREQUISITE
This subject equips students with the fundamental skills required to become critical consumers of research. Students learn how to review peer reviewed literature with a critical lens by applying their developing knowledge of research methodology. Students will learn to develop understanding and appreciation of quantitative and qualitative research designs. Ethical guidelines for the conduct of research will also feature in this subject.
In this final year subject, students draw on previous learning and field placement experience, to critically analyse and reflect on the influence of human service organisations on the development of the human service professional. Students examine organizational structure, management, context and environment and utilize the knowledge gained throughout first and second year, as well as practical examples from their field placement to advance awareness and understanding of the impact of human service organisations on the shaping of the human service practitioner.
In their final field placement, students build on their experience with practical issues offered in Field Placement I. Students further develop their skills in a relevant human service environment under the guidance and supervision of an experienced practitioner. Individual and group supervision via teleconference is also included to continue development of skills in reflective practice and intervention.
SEMESTER
UNIT CODE
TITLE
PREREQUISITE
This subject provides an understanding of how to apply the strengths-based approach to facilitate change in children, adolescents and their families. This approach can harness individual and collective resources, facilitate change and empower families to shift ineffective behavioural patterns. This third-year subject builds on previous studies in first and second year and assists students to develop their personal approach to working with this client group.
In this third-year subject students critically develop awareness, knowledge and understanding of issues relating to culture, diversity and social justice in their role as human service workers. Drawing on knowledge gained in first and second year in regard to basic human rights, students consider the dimensions of diversity and culture and examine social justice practices in human services with the challenge to develop sensitive, inclusive and equitable solutions to identified issues.
Group Processes for Human Services draws on knowledge gained in first year CORE103 Group Work and further develops understanding of group work processes within a human services framework. Human service professionals frequently work with groups or teams on community, organisation and professional levels and the ability to facilitate and competently work within group situations is imperative. Students investigate the nature of organisational systems and small group processes exploring the benefits of working with clients in group situations and the value of collaborative teamwork.
An awareness and understanding of social policy and its impact on the citizens of a society is essential for human service professionals. In Social Policy, students explore the history of social policy development in Australia and engage in analysis of contemporary policy debates. Students learn how social policy is developed and the role of community and government in the process. Students develop the ability to critically analyse policy issues and debates using policy principles and demonstrate understanding of the differences and similarities of social policy in Australia and other Westernised countries.
This subject equips students with the fundamental skills required to become critical consumers of research. Students learn how to review peer reviewed literature with a critical lens by applying their developing knowledge of research methodology. Students will learn to develop understanding and appreciation of quantitative and qualitative research designs. Ethical guidelines for the conduct of research will also feature in this subject.
In this final year subject, students draw on previous learning and field placement experience, to critically analyse and reflect on the influence of human service organisations on the development of the human service professional. Students examine organizational structure, management, context and environment and utilize the knowledge gained throughout first and second year, as well as practical examples from their field placement to advance awareness and understanding of the impact of human service organisations on the shaping of the human service practitioner.
In their final field placement, students build on their experience with practical issues offered in Field Placement I. Students further develop their skills in a relevant human service environment under the guidance and supervision of an experienced practitioner. Individual and group supervision via teleconference is also included to continue development of skills in reflective practice and intervention.

Below are the upcoming intake periods for the Bachelor of Human Services. You can also download the 2021 Higher Education Academic Calendar in PDF format here.

Semester 1, 2021

Semester Commences
Census
Residential School
8th Mar 2021
24th Mar 2021
17th May - 28th May 2021

Semester 2, 2021

Semester Commences
Census
Residential School
12th July 2021
28th July 2021
20 Sept – 1st Oct 2021

Semester 3, 2021

Semester Commences
Census
Residential School
8th Nov 2021
25th Nov 2021
24th Jan – 4th Feb 2022

Semester 1, 2022

Semester Commences
Census
Residential School
7th Mar 2022
23rd Mar 2022
16th May – 27th May 2022

Semester 2, 2022

Semester Commences
Census
Residential School
11th Jul 2022
27th Jul 2022
19th September – 30th September 2022

Semester 3, 2022

Semester Commences
Census
Residential School
7th Nov 2022
24th Nov 2022
23rd January – 3rd February 2023
Course

Bachelor of Human Services (22 Subjects)

Year
Tuition Fee per Subject

$2,250 (2021)
$2,290 (2022)

Total Course Cost

$49,500 (2021)
$50,380 (2022)

Bachelor of Human Services (22 Subjects)
2021
$2,250 each
$49,500
Bachelor of Human Services (22 Subjects)
2022
$2,290 each
$50,380

On your Application Form, you chose one course payment option to pay for your course. You are able to:

  • Option 1: Pay for your course using FEE-HELP (if you are eligible).
  • Option 2: Pay for each semester of your studies upfront.
  • Option 3: Pay for a portion of your fees upfront and the remaining portion using FEE-HELP.

If your application is successful and you accept your placement, the investment for each subject is payable via the following methods after accepting your placement:

  1. If you are choosing to pay all or part of your subject fees through FEE-HELP, you will need to return your Request for FEE-HELP Assistance form for the semester by the due date indicated in your semester enrolment letter. You can find out more about FEE-HELP from the following publication: Fee Help Information – 2022
  2. Payment by credit card, cheque or money order for the semester by the due date indicated in your semester enrolment letter (usually within two weeks of the semester commencing).
  3. If you are paying some of your fees yourself and some through FEE-HELP, then returning your Request for FEEHELP Assistance form and payment of the remaining amount by credit card, cheque or money order by the due date of the semester.

If accepted into the course, you nominate your preferred payment method on your Confirmation of Acceptance form to confirm your place in the course. Please note that the subject fees, and any other associated fees, are current only for the subjects in which you are presently enrolled, and can be reviewed and changed at the Institute’s discretion for future semesters.

Subjects where credit is granted

Students are able to apply for credit of previous studies and experience as described in the RPL and Credit Transfer Policy and are not required to pay the subject fee for each subject in which credit is granted.

Graduates of the following Diplomas are eligible to receive the following automatic credits in the Bachelor of Human Services:

The Institute will take this automatic awarding of credit into account when processing enrolments for graduates of the Diplomas with the student’s Course Enrolment Confirmation Letter detailing the reductions in course fees applicable to students receiving this automatic credit.

  • Diploma of Community Services (CHC52015) - 4 subjects
  • Diploma of Youth Work (CHC50413): 4 subjects
  • Diploma of Counselling or the previous AIPC Diploma of Professional Counselling – 2 subjects
  • Diploma of Financial Counselling (CHC51115) – 1 subject

Additional and Non-Tuition Costs

The following additional and/or non-tuition costs apply:

Please refer to the following textbook lists for the current prices of textbooks. Students are encouraged to submit their online textbook order through the Booktopia prior to commencing their studies for the semester. Students are able to source textbooks from other suppliers if they choose. Students are able to choose from textbooks or e-books, depending on availability, and further information is provided each Semester as to where these can be sourced from.

Bachelor of Human Services Textbook and e-Book List

Residential Schools teach you to apply your theoretical knowledge to counselling scenarios. Residential Schools provide you with an ideal teaching forum to handle practical counselling issues. You also meet and share ideas and experiences with fellow students and have the opportunity to reflect on the development of your counselling skills.

Residential Schools are held at our academic rooms in Brisbane, Sydney, Melbourne and Perth, Australia and are scheduled at the end of each semester. Depending on the numbers of subjects you have undertaken during the semester, Residential Schools are up to one or two weeks’ duration. If studying full time, you complete between 2.5 and 10 days at a Residential School at the end of each semester. Not all subjects include a Residential School component. If you are studying part time, you only need to attend the days of the Residential School allocated to the specific subject.

Students are required to meet personal expenses such as travel, accommodation and meals. Travel includes travel costs to and from where the Residential School is held and travel to and from the Institute's premises each day.

When attending a residential in a city in which you do not live, you should allow approximately $300 per day for accommodation, meals and incidentals. This daily allocation has been determined by the ATO's recommended allowance rates for Brisbane, Melbourne, Sydney and Perth, available at: http://law.ato.gov.au/atolaw/. You should also add the cost of return airfares, or cost for another mode of travel, from your place of residence to the Residential School location.

Students have access to comprehensive online library of texts and resources.

External students borrowing hard copy library resources will need to pay for postage to return the borrowed item/s to the Institute at Locked Bag 15, Fortitude Valley 4006. Please refer to the Australia Post postage calculator for current indicative pricing: http://auspost.com.au/apps/postage-calculator.html.

For students living overseas, please check postage costs with your chosen postal or courier service. Overdue items are charged at $1- per day until the item is returned.

Students are able to apply for Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) or Credit Transfer to receive credit for one or more subjects** of the Bachelor of Human Services (up to a maximum of 8 subjects).

This enhances student progression through the course and provides recognition for students entering the course with relevant prior studies and work experience. Students granted RPL or credit are not disadvantaged in achieving the expected learning outcomes of the course, and the integrity of the qualification must be maintained.

RPL recognises that students, due to relevant life and work experiences, may already possess the requisite skills and knowledge for subject/s in the Bachelor course. Students who have been working within a counselling environment for a number of years are able to apply for recognition of this prior learning or experience. Exemption can be applied for one or more course subjects** (up to a maximum of 8 subjects).

Assessing credit from prior experience takes into account the authenticity, currency, quality, relevance, transferability and comparability of the experience to the requirements of the subject for which credit is being applied.

Credit Transfer

Credit Transfer refers to obtaining credit towards another course on the basis of having completed previous study of an equivalent subject or unit. Students who have completed similar units to those included in the Bachelor of Human Services are welcome to apply for Credit Transfer. Students who have completed or partially completed another counselling course are particularly encouraged to apply for Credit Transfer.

Credit will not normally be granted for formal study completed more than 10 years prior to application unless there is evidence of continued relevance of this study for the course towards which credit is sought. Credit is granted where there is substantial overlap with the content and/or learning outcomes of the subject for which credit is being applied.

When assessing credit based on prior study, consideration is given to the objectives of the course, methods of delivery and assessment, admission requirements, course durations, the breadth and depth of the course material, practical training requirements, and experience requirements.

**Students can only obtain credit for a total maximum of 8 subjects inclusive of whether this credit has been obtained via RPL or credit transfer.

Bachelor of Human Services

Students progressing into the Bachelor of Human Services from the Diploma of Community Services (Case Management) (Course Code: CHC52015) will automatically receive credit for the following subjects:

  • CORE102 Communication Skills
  • HUS101 Introduction to Human Services
  • HUS102 Case Management in Human Services
  • CORE103 Group Work

The student’s record will be automatically updated and a confirmation letter sent to the student. Students are not required to formally apply through the RPL process.

Students progressing into the Bachelor of Human Services from the Diploma of Youth Work (Course Code: CHC50413) will automatically receive credit for the following subjects:

  • CORE102 Communication Skills
  • HUS102 Case Management in Human Services
  • CORE103 Group Work
  • COU303 Working with Children and Adolescents

The student’s record will be automatically updated and a confirmation letter sent to the student. Students are not required to formally apply through the RPL process.

Students Articulating from the Institute’s Diploma of Professional Counselling (Course Codes: 30073QLD or 30506QLD) or Diploma of Counselling (CHC51708, CHC51712, or CHC51015) will automatically receive credit for the following subjects:

  • HUS102 Case Management in Human Services
  • COU104 Micro Counselling Skills

The student’s record will be automatically updated and a confirmation letter sent to the student. Students are not required to formally apply through the RPL process.

Students Articulating from the Diploma of Financial Counselling (Course Code: CHC51115) will automatically receive credit for the following subjects:

  • COU104 Micro Counselling Skills

The student’s record will be automatically updated and a confirmation letter sent to the student. Students are not required to formally apply through the RPL process.

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We understand that sometimes you may find yourself in a situation where you are unable to continue with your studies. If you need to withdraw from a subject, simply follow our formal withdrawal process prior your census date and you will not be charged the subject fee.

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