In this Issue

Hello!
Intothediploma
Intojobs
Intomhss
Intocounselling
Intobookstore
Intoteam
Intoarticles
Intodevelopment
Intoconnection
Intotwitter
Intoquotes
Intoseminars

Contact us

Publications

Editor: Sandra Poletto
Email: ezine@aipc.net.au
Website: www.aipc.net.au

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Copyright: 2012 Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors

Hello!
 
Welcome to Edition 163 of Institute Inbrief. Loneliness is more than a person feeling that they want to be able to connect on a social level with others – but rather it is a perceived sense of disconnection, rejection and alienation. In part 2 of this 2-part series, we discuss various counselling strategies for dealing with the lonely client and provide you with guidelines to maintaining appropriate professional boundaries.
 
Also in this edition:
  • MHSS Workshops
  • Previously Published Articles
  • Professional Development news
  • Blog and Twitter updates
  • Upcoming seminar dates
If you would like to access daily articles & resources, and interact with over 5000 peers, make sure you join our community today: www.facebook.com/counsellors. It is a great way to stay in touch and share your interest and knowledge in counselling.
 
Enjoy your reading,
 
 
Editor
 
 
Join our community:
 
 
Help those around you suffering mental illness in silence: www.mhss.net.au
 
Intothediploma
 
AIPC provides you with Flexible Course Delivery Modes
So YOU set the rules for how and when you learn...
 
AIPC’s accredited and nationally recognised Diploma of Counselling is designed so that you determine the manner and pace you study. You study entirely at your own pace (except of course if you’re receiving a government benefit such as Austudy) and you can start at any time, graduating in only 18-months.
 
Not only can you set the pace you study, you also determine the mode you want to study. You can study Externally (at home with phone and email access to our counselling tutors), In-Class, Online or any combination… all the time fully supported by our huge national team throughout our 8 Student Support Centres.
 
External learning means you can complete your entire course from the comfort of your home (or office, or overseas, or virtually anywhere!). Your course comes complete with fully self-contained, referenced and professionally presented learning materials including 18 individual workbooks and readings. It really is as simple as working through the material and contacting us for support along the way. If you live locally to one of our support centres you can also attend tutorials to provide you with face to face contact if you wish (this option is ideal if you enjoy working more independently or have a busy schedule).
 
In-Class learning is a classroom forum where you learn with other students from a qualified lecturer. Classes are available in most main cities, at flexible times. In-Class is a great way for you to accelerate your learning, interact with other students and stay highly motivated. (This option is particularly suitable if you enjoy learning in the classroom environment with other students).
 
Online learning allows you to complete your learning entirely via your PC. You still receive all the high quality hardcopy resources (so you don’t miss out on anything!), but you’ll access all your learning materials and complete assessments online.
 
Any Combination. Of course you don’t have to stick with one learning method throughout your studies. You’re welcome to use whichever method suits your needs and desires at the time. You may choose to complete one workbook In-Class, another Online, then Externally. Whatever is most convenient!
 
Learn more - visit www.aipc.net.au/lz today!
 
Watch inspirational stories from some of our Graduates: www.aipc.net.au/gradvideo
 
Hear what Employers say about our Graduates: www.aipc.net.au/employervids
 
Intojobs
 
Course Resource Development Officer
 
The Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors (AIPC) specialises in counsellor, life coaching and community services training programs delivered through external learning.
 
AIPC requires a part time (3 days per week) Course Resource Development Officer to write and review learning materials for counselling and life coaching training programs. The position is based in Fortitude Valley, Brisbane. Normal hours of work are 9am to 5pm. Days of work can be negotiated.
 
The Course Resource Development Officer will:
  • Source suitable content and resources to be utilised in developing learning materials according to the unit structure
  • Arrange content into a cohesive format
  • Write learning materials and teaching resources
  • Liaise with Institute management on content and progress of resource development
  • Incorporate feedback into materials
  • Proof learning materials and teaching resources
The successful applicant will have:
  • A Bachelor-level qualification in Psychology, Counselling (or a closely related field)
  • Experience working in counselling (or similar) roles
  • Well-developed written communication skills
  • Computer literacy and good keyboarding skills.
To apply, email your CV/ resume and a short application letter addressing above criteria to cecelia@aipc.net.au.
 
Salary level: Teacher/Tutor/Instructor (Level 5) under the Educational Services (Post-secondary Education) Award 2010.
 
Applications will be assessed on a first-in basis prior to 25th July.
 
Intomhss
 
Mental Health Social Support Workshops
 
The mental health of Australians is deteriorating. And that’s putting your family, friends and colleagues at increasing risk of depression, anxiety, alcohol and drug use, and suicide.
 
The statistics are frightening:
  • 45% of adult Australians will experience a mental illness.
  • Mental illness is the leading cause of 'healthy life' lost.
  • 3 million Australians will experience a major depressive illness.
  • 26% of 16-24 year olds have experienced a mental disorder in the last 12-months.
  • Mental disorders are the leading contributor to the total burden of disease among young Australians - accounting for 49% of that total.
  • 12% of 13-17 year olds have reported having thought about suicide.
There's a very good chance that right now someone close to you is secretly and silently suffering. Unattended that suffering could lead to a serious psychological problem including depression or even suicide. If you’re not appropriately equipped, mental illness could hit someone you love with devastating consequences.
 
This is why we believe the ability to identify early onset mental illness, appropriately intervene and provide support is the most crucial life skill you can have. These are Mental Health Social Support (MHSS) skills.
 
You can acquire these critical life skills in our upcoming 2-Day MHSS Workshops. Places are strictly limited due to the interactive nature of the program. You can reserve your spot here now:
 
It’s very important you book now to avoid missing out.
 
If you prefer to undertake your training entirely online, visit www.mhss.net.au/lz to learn more and register for the MHSS eCourse.
 
Click here for information on CPD endorsement for counsellors, nurses and other professionals.
 
Intocounselling
 
Counselling Strategies for Dealing with the Lonely Client
 
In part 1 of this 2-part series, we explored the symptoms, causes and effects of loneliness. In this continued article, we’ll discuss various counselling strategies for dealing with the lonely client and provide you with guidelines to maintaining appropriate professional boundaries.
 
Counselling strategies for dealing with the lonely client
 
The level of loneliness a client experiences can be changed. It is important for the counsellor to recognise this. It is also important for the counsellor to be aware that loneliness is a common human experience. Loneliness does not have to be a negative or permanent state. Rather, it should be viewed as an indicator that important needs of the client are not being met (Peplau, 1998). A client will engage in counselling when they become overtly aware that their needs aren’t being met. The counsellor can help the client to identify which needs are not being met in the client’s situation.
 
Their loneliness may result from a variety of needs or situations. It may involve the need to develop a social skills or a higher level of social competence to seek a circle of friends. It may involve learning to do things for themselves, without social interaction i.e. friends. Or it can involve learning to feel better or more content about themselves in general by working on their self-esteem and/or assertiveness skills (Peplau, 1998). Sometimes, clients become so afraid of being alone that they may hold onto unhealthy and/or circumstances rather than risk the consequence of becoming lonely if they were to let go.
 
Talking to a counsellor can allow the client to explore and understand their problems, and to find the courage and strength to face and change the circumstance that they feel so overwhelmed by. The counsellor can teach them how to gain a healthy, functioning self-esteem to achieve a positive sense self-acceptance, and find relating to others is both achievable and enjoyable (Murphy, 1992).
 
Teaching a client how to create their own happiness alone is a key part of building self-confidence and overcoming fears of rejection and loneliness. As long as they do not believe that they can create their own happiness and enjoy life alone, then the client will be less confident and more dependent on others creating their happiness.
 
The feelings associated with loneliness are a self-perpetuating cycle – the lonelier a client feels, the harder it is to take steps to break out of their loneliness, and the harder it is for them to commit to change. As with changing any patterns of behaviour, it takes effort and commitment for the client to begin to move out of feeling lonely.
 
From a counselling perspective, breaking the cycle of loneliness requires finding its cause, then identifying any existing dysfunctional ways the client deals with it (hiding away, drinking alcohol, sleeping).
 
The next steps usually include identifying the settings and conditions under which one feels willing to communicate with others, and finally encouragement to take the 'risk' of contacting new people or former acquaintances, which is facilitated by the counsellors ongoing encouragement and support (Warwick, 2006).
 
It should be remembered that feeling lonely is a common human emotion experienced by everyone at times (it is not a defect). Intimate friendships take time to develop, and sometimes it is useful to help deal with the loneliness by having clients share their experiences with someone else (Aspel, 2001).
 
Encourage the client to think of themselves as a whole person. Not to neglect their other needs just because their social (friendship and companionship) needs are not being met. Some points for counsellors to consider when working with the lonely client is to encourage the client to:
  • Realise that everyone gets lonely at some stage in their life. It doesn't mean there is anything wrong with you or that you have to stay lonely. Loneliness is especially common when transitions or change is occurring.
  • Get together with the people they know, even if they aren't who they want to be with right now. Human contact makes more contact easier.
  • Take risks about revealing themself. Saying what's in their mind, if it seems at all likely the other person will be receptive. Teach the client how to be assertive.
  • Encourage the client to learn how to see their detachment.
  • Notice the difference between loneliness and solitude.
  • Do everything they would normally do with a partner or friend. Many times it isn't the partner or friend you are missing, but the activities and hobbies you shared. Take themself out for a date.
  • Encourage them to connect with anyone who they assess to be genuine, and who is around you. Following their instincts about people can be important here.
  • Set up social activities when they're not feeling lonely. Plan in advance if possible.
(Warwick, 2006)
 
If a client panics when left alone, and constantly seeks others out in order to avoid inner loneliness, it might be worth spending some time teaching them how to feel relaxed in their own company. Spending time alone may involve facing the difficult feelings that relentless socialising keeps at bay. It may also enable them to focus on the kind of person they really are, and what they really want to do.
 
It can also be worth encouraging a client to spend time concentrating or participating in something that really interests them, which they can enjoy as an end in itself. Focus on the pleasure it gives them and the fact that periods of time spent alone can be rewarding.
 
Does your client feel uncomfortable in situations such as meeting new people, speaking in front of groups, and dealing with someone who is upset, having to tell someone about a mistake, or divulging your inner feelings?  Fear of rejection may underlie all of these situations. Work with the client on their self-esteem, confidence and possible self-image.
 
If your client experiences difficulty overcoming fear of rejection as means of overcoming their loneliness, the following can be considered:
  • If you find that the client is lonely because they fear rejection, try to get them to look at themself objectively. For example, notice some of the qualities a friend might value in them, and try to remember that they have these things to offer.
  • Try to find out what things they have in common with others. By doing this they may realise they are not so different from others after all 
  • If they find that someone is indifferent to them, remember that they may have something on their mind that makes them seem self-absorbed and thus it is not necessarily personal.
(Loneliness, 2006)
 
Small group counselling can be helpful in providing an opportunity for clients to fully realise that other people suffer difficulties which may be similar to their own. They can compare notes, offer each other support, and learn, in a safe context, something of how other people see them.   The counsellor could facilitate a self-help or psycho educational support group for example.
 
The prospect of joining a group can feel a bit intimidating for the lonely client initially, but it can be a positive morale booster to realise that they are not alone in your feelings; that they are not weird; that people can respond to them with warmth and understanding; and that you have things to offer other people.
 
Teaching the client assertiveness skills can also be an important tool. Discuss the difference between non-assertive behaviour ("I lose, you win" - passive, indirect, avoidance); aggressive behaviour. "I win, you lose" - dominating, controlling, selfish); and assertive ("win-win"- caring, calm, understanding, diplomatic, honest, but direct and firm behaviour). The most successful relationships are assertive-assertive ones (Murphy, 1992). Teach the client how to be both an understanding listener who can communicate their own feelings in a direct, empathetic, and assertive manner to others (Counselling loneliness, 2006).
 
In summary, teach and encourage your client to not define themself as a lonely person. No matter how bad they feel, loneliness will dissipate when they focus their attention on the needs they currently meet and how they can develop new ways to engage their unmet needs through the counselling process (Counselling loneliness, 2006).
 
Short Case Study
 
Mary is a 38 year old, single, professional woman. In her childhood Mary experienced rejection by her father when he walked out on her mother and was eventually bullied at school. 
 
Mary tells you in counselling that she can only be happy if she marries and has children by the time she is 40. She fears becoming too old to have children and not having a loving partner forever being alone. She now has a desperate need to get married; she comes to you for counselling to learn how to avert her fears of loneliness coming true.
 
Maintaining appropriate professional boundaries
 
It is important for you as the counsellor to understand and apply professional boundaries and ethics when working with clients from any client group. However, it is more important when working with clients who are presenting with issues and/or concerns of loneliness as they are vulnerable in terms of looking to establish social networks and relationships as a tool to their recovery from loneliness.
 
The professional counsellor working with the lonely client needs to consider. The following are boundaries in order to maintain an appropriate relationship with the client:
 
The counsellor needs to be self-aware and understand their own vulnerabilities in terms of their social needs in order to not transfer the counsellor’s issue to the client.
 
Have sound psychological health.
 
Be open-minded and objective with what the client disclosing regardless of any level of resistance. Sensitivity to any cultural racial or ethnic factors which may exist in the way the client seeks social contact i.e. not appropriate to teach Muslims to use eye contact to engage people as it’s not a positive communication strategy in this religion.
 
Apply a level of professional competence in order with the ethical standards of the profession (see Australian Counselling Association – www.theaca.net.au – for a copy of these).
 
Be trustworthy. Counsellors who exhibit qualities such as reliability, responsibility and predictability safeguard their client’s disclosures; respond with energy and dynamism with regard to the client’s problem.
 
Be interpersonally attractive to the client. This occurs when the client perceives the counsellor to seem similar to them. It is not appropriate to achieve this with self-disclosure by the counsellor building rapport, establishing and applying an empathic relationship with the client.
 
Keep your professional development and supervision up. Debrief. The lonely client’s problem will be multi-faceted with loneliness being both a cause and outcome. As such, it can be difficult for a counsellor who hasn’t directly worked with this client group to work professional supervision –peer, individual or group will assist the counsellor to overcome any ethical dilemmas opt treatment/process issues.
 
Ensure you as the counsellor understand what the client’s expectations and purpose (goals) of counselling are to ensure the therapeutic relationship is assisting the client appropriately and consistently with regards to their needs.
 
Be aware of and possibly revise the stages or steps in the counselling process. If the counsellor follows these steps, then appropriate boundaries are more likely to be maintained than if a counsellor has no structure:
  1. Relationships building – establishment of rapport and therapeutic relationship
  2. Problem assessment – assessing or defining of the presenting problem/ issues/ concern with the client.
  3. Goal setting – Identifying and setting of client goals by also taking into account the clients expectations of the counselling process.
  4. Counselling Intervention – The counsellor selecting and indicating the appropriate intervention i.e. CBT, SFT etc.
  5. Evaluations, termination or referral - this step involves evaluating the process with respect to achievement of the clients goals negotiated in Step 3. Introducing termination of the process, follow-up of the client post-counselling termination. If counselling of the lonely client is not able to be undertaken by the counsellor then a referral should be made and facilitated for this client.
(Hackney and Cormier, 2005)
 
References:
 
Aspel, Melaine, Ann., (2001). Let’s talk about feeling lonely. New York; Rosen Publishing.
 
Hackney, H., Cormier, S., (2005). The professional counsellor – a process guide to helping. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.
 
Loneliness, (2007), retrieved on 25 October, 2007. Retrieved from http://www.uoregon.edu/~counsel.  
 
Murphy, P.M., Kupshik, G.A. (1992). Loneliness, stress and well-being; a helper’s guide. London; New York: Tavistock/Routledge.
 
Peplau, Letitia Ann, Perlman, Daniel, (1982). Loneliness: a source of current theory, research and therapy. Ann Arbor, Mich.: U.M.I.
 
Warwick, (2006), retrieved on 25 October, 2007. Retrieved from http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services.  
 
Join our community:
 
 
Intobookstore
 
The Institute has a list of recommended textbooks and DVDs which can add great value to your learning journey - and the good news is that you can purchase them very easily. The AIPC bookstore will give YOU:
  • Discounted prices!
  • Easy ordering method!
  • Quality guarantee!
This fortnight's feature is...
 
Name: Fundamentals of Clinical Supervision, 4th Edition
Authors: Bernard, J & Goodyear, R
AIPC Code: BERNARD
AIPC Price: $110.65 (RRP $122.95)
ISBN: 978-020-559-1787
 
This book offers a review of the clinical supervision field in a way that will be equally useful to the student of supervision and to the supervision practitioner as a professional resource. The authors intended this book to be both scholarly and pragmatic.
 
To order this book, simply contact your nearest Student Support Centre or the AIPC Head Office (1800 657 667).
 
Intoteam
 
Katrina Travers
 
Lecturer
Australian Institute of Psychology
 
After graduating from University of Newcastle with a Bachelor of Science (honours) in Psychology in 1993, Katrina commenced her career as a psychologist within the NSW Department of Correctional Services, working in all levels of security (minimum to maximum). During this time, Katrina was supervised in the use of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for issues such as anger problems, anxiety problems, and acute stress reactions. She was also involved in the assessment of inmates soon to be released, as well as the assessment of serious offenders for the annual review board of these inmates.
 
In 1996, Katrina moved to Brisbane where she gained employment within the health system, working for private general and psychiatric hospitals. Within the general hospital setting, Katrina was involved in helping elderly inpatients with anxiety, healthy behaviour change, and mood again using cognitive behaviour therapy, in order to improve their recovery. Within the psychiatric hospital setting, Katrina was involved in the developing and implementing of drug and alcohol dependence programs to outpatient populations of all ages, including those with comorbid post-traumatic stress disorder.
 
Between the years of 2001 to 2009, Katrina chose to concentrate her time raising her family and undertake her PhD in Clinical Psychology at Griffith University, Gold Coast campus. Her research area within her PhD is an investigation into the validity of the reformulated learned helplessness theory when applied to variables of interest including depression, achievement, and ill health. Katrina is coming to the end of her PhD, having successfully improved the common measure of pessimism/optimism (known as the Attributional Style Questionnaire), such that it returns results with improved reliability and validity.
 
Katrina’s PhD has also involved using this improved measure of pessimism/optimism to re-investigate the reformulated learned helplessness theory postulate that individuals who are pessimistic in their style of thinking are also at risk of suffering depression, less achievement, and are at risk of suffering increased ill health. Katrina has also extended this research to other variables that have not yet been investigated within the published literature, including investigating the hypothesis that women who are more pessimistic in their thinking also report suffering increased premenstrual stress.
 
In 2009, Katrina decided to return to work, and commenced working as a consultant psychologist in a division of general practice, accepting referrals from GPs under the Better Access initiative. Katrina helped individuals with a wide range of issues including mood disorders and adjustment disorders.
 
In March 2011, Katrina was successful in gaining employment as a lecturer for the Australian Institute of Psychology and the Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors. During this time, Katrina has been successfully lecturing on the Ethics, Law and Counselling course, the Relationships Counselling course, and the Domestic Violence and Abuse course. She has also been involved in the upgrading of these courses, as well as the writing of new courses for the Bachelor of Psychology degree. In 2012 Katrina is also lecturing on the Introduction to Psychology 101 course.
 
Other tasks that Katrina is involved with includes being involved with the course advisory committee of the Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors, as well as heading a research group in the area of adult learning theory and the use of technology in distance education models.
 
 
Intoarticles
 
Group Problem-Solving Strategies, Part 1
 
A number of problems can occur during the formation of the group and afterwards. Some of these difficulties involve group members while others are related to group processes. One of the best ways to handle group problems is to prevent them. Where prevention is not possible, the group members and the group therapist can work together to bring about resolution (Gladding, 2003).
 
Click here to continue reading this article.
 
 
Crisis Intervention in Counselling, Part 1
 
Crisis intervention is the most widely applied form of brief treatment used by mental health practitioners. All crisis intervention and trauma treatment specialists are in agreement that before intervening, a full assessment of the individual and the situation must take place.
 
Early intervention may prevent acute traumatic stress reactions from becoming chronic stress disorders. Crisis intervention attempts to help individuals take advantage of opportunities to develop from within the context of the crisis encountered and minimise risks of getting stuck in the memory of the crisis whereby the incident dominates the person’s life well after it has ended.
 
Click here to continue reading this article...
 
Other articles: www.aipc.net.au/articles
 
Intodevelopment
 
Convenient Professional Development
 
Hundreds of counsellors, psychologists, social workers, mental health nurses and allied health professionals already access over 100 Hours of Professional Development online, for less than $1 a day. Now it's your turn.
 
Mental Health Academy (MHA) is the leading provider of professional development education for the mental health industry. MHA provides the largest variety of courses and videos workshops, all conveniently delivered via the internet.
 
With MHA, you no longer have to worry about high costs, proximity and availability, or fitting a workshop around your lifestyle!
 
You can access the huge range of PD, including courses and video workshops, whenever and from wherever you want.
 
Whether you are looking for courses on anxiety and depression, or a video workshop discussing the intricacies of relationship counselling - Mental Health Academy is your gateway to over 100 hours of professional development content.
 
Take a quick look at what Mental Health Academy offers:
  • Over 70 professionally developed courses.
  • On-demand, webstreamed video workshops.
  • Over 100 hours of professional development.
  • Extremely relevant topics.
  • New courses released every month.
  • Video supported training.
  • Online, 24/7 access to resources.
  • Endorsement by multiple Associations, including AASW, ACA and APS.
Begin your journey today. Click on the link below to register for a monthly or annual unlimited membership. As an unlimited member, you can access all MHA courses for less than $1 per day, and receive discounts when purchasing any video workshops:
 
 
 
Intoconnection
 
Have you visited the Counselling Connection Blog yet? There are over 600 interesting posts including case studies, profiles, success stories, videos and much more. Make sure you too get connected (and thank you for those who have already submitted comments and suggestions).
 
Working with older LGBT people
 
Two of the biggest cultural challenges in Western society remain age and sexuality. Despite significant developments in recent times, including important protective legislation for both groups, older people and LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) people remain social groups that often attract ambivalent attention.
 
As with other areas of cultural tension, such as racism, both ageism and homophobia can be seen as attitudes that contain powerful fears beneath the surface hatred. For individuals and society as a whole, such feelings can also be seen as expressions of what we fear or resist within ourselves.
 
Click here to continue reading this post...
 
Get new posts delivered by email! Visit our FeedBurner subscription page and click the link on the subscription box.
 
 
Intotwitter
 
Follow us on Twitter and get the latest and greatest in counselling news. To follow, visit http://twitter.com/counsellingnews and click "Follow".
 
Featured Tweets
 
Subscribe to Mental Health Academy's free newsletter to receive a complimentary PD video on neuroscience & counselling: http://www.mentalhealthacademy.com.au
 
Domestic abuse: how can we help? (PDF): http://t.co/yF0GlxRl
 
Widely held beliefs about Neuro-Linguistic Programming and lying are unfounded: http://t.co/NrQlWoPj
 
Quick hits for July 11: Interesting reads for counselors from around the Internet: http://t.co/iH9LKkpN
 
Watch our graduates as they talk about their journeys to become professional counsellors - it is truly inspirational: http://www.aipc.net.au/gradvideo/
 
Forget about thinking different, the real secret is perceiving different! http://t.co/o8TciP3S
 
Can incivility lead to a spiral of aggression and tarnish a culture? Christine L. Porath and Amir Erez investigate: http://t.co/xRRXHSky
 
Note that you need a Twitter profile to follow a list. If you do not have one yet, visit http://twitter.com to create a free profile today!
 
Tweet Count: 3505
Follower Count: 4761
 
Intoquotes
 
"I am still determined to be cheerful and happy, in whatever situation I may be; for I have also learned from experience that the greater part of our happiness or misery depends upon our dispositions, and not upon our circumstances."
 
~ Martha Washington
 
Intoseminars
 
Many students of the Diploma of Counselling attend seminars to complete the practical requirements of their course. Seminars provide an ideal opportunity to network with other students and liaise with qualified counselling professionals in conjunction with completing compulsory coursework.
 
Not sure if you need to attend Seminars? Click here for information on Practical Assessments.
 
Below are the remainder seminars dates and locations for 2012. You can also access this information and seminar pre-requisites via our website: www.aipc.net.au/timetables.php.
 
To register for a seminar, please contact your Student Support Centre.
 
BRISBANE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 04/08, 20/10, 01/12
Communication Skills II - 09/09, 03/11
The Counselling Process - 22/09, 24/11
Counselling Therapies I - 8-9/12
Counselling Therapies II - 21-22/07, 27-28/10
Case Management - 10-11/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 13/10
Counselling Applications - 11/08, 16/12
 
CDA Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 04/08, 20/10, 01/12
Communication Skills II - 09/09, 03/11
The Counselling Process - 22/09, 24/11
Counselling Therapies I - 06-07/10, 8-9/12
Counselling Therapies II - 21-22/07, 27-28/10
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 25/08, 17/11
Family Therapy - 08/09, 15/12
Case Management - 10-11/11
 
GOLD COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 18/08, 17/11
Communication Skills II - 15/09, 15/12
The Counselling Process - 21/07, 27/10, 01/12
Counselling Therapies I - 21-22/09
Counselling Therapies II - 23-24/11
Case Management - 19-20/10
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 03/08
Counselling Applications - 17/08
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 21/07, 27/10, 01/12
Communication Skills I - 18/08, 17/11
Communication Skills II - 15/10, 15/12
Counselling Therapies I - 21-22/09
Counselling Therapies II - 23-24/11
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 26/10
Family Therapy - 17/08
Case Management - 19-20/10
 
MELBOURNE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 05/08, 01/09, 06/10, 03/11, 01/12
Communication Skills II - 11/08, 02/09, 07/10, 04/11, 02/12
The Counselling Process - 04/08, 29/09, 27/10, 23/11, 14/12
Counselling Therapies I - 18-19/08, 8-9/09, 13-14/10, 10-11/11, 8-9/12
Counselling Therapies II - 21-22/07, 25-26/08, 15-16/09, 20-21/10, 17-18/11, 15-16/12
Case Management - 28-29/07, 22-23/09, 27-28/10, 24-25/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 30/09
Counselling Applications - 28/07
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 04/08, 29/09, 27/10, 23/11, 14/12
Communication Skills I - 05/08, 01/09, 06/10, 03/11, 01/12
Communication Skills II - 11/08, 02/09, 07/10, 04/11, 02/12
Counselling Therapies I - 18-19/08, 8-9/09, 13-14/10, 10-11/11, 8-9/12
Counselling Therapies II - 21-22/07, 25-26/08, 15-16/09, 20-21/10, 17-18/11, 15-16/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 30/09
Family Therapy - 12/08
Case Management - 28-29/07, 22-23/09, 27-28/10, 24-25/11
 
NORTHERN TERRITORY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 18/08, 01/12
Communication Skills II - 23/07, 22/09, 08/12
The Counselling Process - 10/11
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/11
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/08, 15-16/12
Case Management - 21-22/07, 24-25/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 06/10
Counselling Applications - 27/10
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 10/11
Communication Skills I - 18/08, 01/12
Communication Skills II - 23/07, 22/09, 08/12
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/11
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/08, 15-16/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 03/11
Family Therapy - 15/09
Case Management - 21-22/07, 24-25/11
 
SOUTH AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 01/09, 10/11
Communication Skills II - 02/09, 11/11
The Counselling Process - 05/08, 14/10, 09/12
Counselling Therapies I - 28-29/07, 24-25/11
Counselling Therapies II - 08-09/09
Case Management - 21-22/07, 06-07/10
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 15/09
Counselling Applications - 13/10
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 05/08, 14/10, 09/12
Communication Skills I - 01/09, 10/11
Communication Skills II - 02/09, 11/11
Counselling Therapies I - 28-29/07, 24-25/11
Counselling Therapies II - 08-09/09
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 04/08, 08/12
Family Therapy - 16/09
Case Management - 21-22/07, 06-07/10
 
SUNSHINE COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 04/08, 10/11
Communication Skills II - 05/08, 11/11
The Counselling Process - 29/09
Counselling Therapies I - 18-19/08
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/10
Case Management - 06-07/10
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 13/10
Counselling Applications - 03/11
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 29/09
Communication Skills I - 04/08, 10/11
Communication Skills II - 05/08, 11/11
Counselling Therapies I - 18-19/08
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/10
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 08/09
Family Therapy - 22/09
Case Management - 06-07/10
 
SYDNEY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 28/08, 06/10, 15/11
Communication Skills II - 31/08, 20/10, 30/11
The Counselling Process - 02/08, 27/08, 22/09, 15/10, 03/11, 26/11, 13/12
Counselling Therapies I - 27-28/07, 27-28/09, 23-24/11
Counselling Therapies II - 17-18/08, 13-14/10, 14-15/12
Case Management - 24-25/08, 26-27/10, 06-07/12
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 30/07, 04/10, 17/12
Counselling Applications - 31/07, 05/10, 18/12
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 02/08, 27/08, 22/09, 15/10, 03/11, 26/11, 13/12
Communication Skills I - 28/08, 06/10, 15/11
Communication Skills II - 31/08, 20/10, 30/11
Counselling Therapies I - 27-28/07, 27-28/09, 23-24/11
Counselling Therapies II - 17-18/08, 13-14/10, 14-15/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 23/07, 01/09, 19/11
Family Therapy - 24/07, 08/09, 20/11
Case Management - 24-25/08, 26-27/10, 06-07/12
 
TASMANIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 23/09, 16/12
Communication Skills II - 05/08, 04/11
The Counselling Process - 19/08, 25/11
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/11
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/08, 01-02/12
Case Management - 11-12/08, 10-11/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 21/10
Counselling Applications - 29/07, 28/10
 
CDA Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 23/09, 16/12
Communication Skills II - 05/08, 04/11
The Counselling Process - 19/08, 25/11
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/11
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/08, 01-02/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 02/09, 09/12
Family Therapy - 14/10
Case Management - 11-12/08, 10-11/11
 
WESTERN AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 04/08, 15/09, 27/10, 08/12
Communication Skills II - 05/08, 16/09, 28/10, 09/12
The Counselling Process - 08/09, 06/10, 03/11, 01/12
Counselling Therapies I - 01-02/09, 24-25/11
Counselling Therapies II - 21-22/07, 22-23/09, 15-16/12
Case Management - 25-26/08, 10-11/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 09/09
Counselling Applications - 11/08, 04/11
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 08/09, 06/10, 03/11, 01/12
Communication Skills I - 04/08, 15/09, 27/10, 08/12
Communication Skills II - 05/08, 16/09, 28/10, 09/12
Counselling Therapies I - 01-02/09, 24-25/11
Counselling Therapies II - 21-22/07, 22-23/09, 15-16/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 29/09
Family Therapy - 11/08, 07/10
Case Management - 25-26/08, 10-11/11
 
Important Note: Advertising of the dates above does not guarantee availability of places in the seminar. Please check availability with the respective Student Support Centre.
 
 
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