In this Issue

Hello!
Intobachelor
Intothediploma
Intomhss
Intocounselling
Intobookstore
Intoarticles
Intodevelopment
Intoconnection
Intotwitter
Intoquotes
Intoseminars

Contact us

Publications

Editor: Sandra Poletto
Email: ezine@aipc.net.au
Website: www.aipc.net.au

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Copyright: 2012 Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors

Hello!
Welcome to Edition 182 of Institute Inbrief. In a previous article we reviewed a range of treatments that are used to help clients suffering from obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). In this edition we showcase the case study of Darcy [fictional name], who worked with a psychologist to address the symptoms and history of her OCD.
 
Also in this edition:
  • Mid-year intake closing: Bachelor programs
  • MHSS Workshops – June
  • Articles and CPD updates
  • Blog and Twitter updates
  • Upcoming seminar dates
Book sale: We are selling a range of counselling and psychology books at discounted prices via the Bookon marketplace: http://bookon.com.au/Sellers/aipcsso/. Stocks are very limited - it's first in, first served. Check out the available titles and let your friends know before stocks run out!
 
Enjoy your reading,
 
Editor.
 
 
Join our community:
 
 
 
 
Intobachelor
 
MID-YEAR INTAKE – CLOSING
 
Bachelor of Counselling &
Bachelor of Psychological Science
 
The available places in the Mid-Year Intake for the Bachelor of Psychological Science and Bachelor of Counselling are filling very quickly.
 
If you want a secure future doing something you love, then a career in Psychology or Counselling could be ideal for you.
 
Our unique learning model means you can earn-while-you-learn, so you don’t have to give up work to fit in your studies. And as both programs are government Fee Help approved, you can learn now and pay later.
 
Some unique features of the programs include:
  • Study externally from anywhere in Australia, even overseas.
  • Residential Schools in Melbourne*, Sydney* and Brisbane.
  • [Psych] Save up to $35,800 on your qualification.
  • [Couns] Save up to $26,400 on your qualification.
  • Start with just 1 subject.
  • Online learning portal with access to all study materials, readings and video lectures.
  • [Psych] Accredited by the Australian Psychology Accreditation Council (APAC).
  • No minimum HSC or OP results required to gain entry.
  • Learn in a friendly, small group environment.
*Bachelor of Psychological Science - Residential Schools in Melbourne and Sydney are available for CORE subjects.
 
OBLIGATION FREE EOI
 
You can submit your obligation free expression of interest (or enrol) in the Bachelor of Psychological Science here: www.aip.edu.au/degree
 
And the Bachelor of Counselling here: www.aipc.edu.au/degree
 
If you have any queries and would like to talk to one of our friendly team members, please call:
 
Brisbane: 1800-353-643
Sydney: 1800-677-697
Melbourne: 1800-622-489
Adelaide: 1800-246-324
Perth: 1800-246-381
 
PS See what students think of the program: www.aipc.net.au/hevids
 
Intothediploma
 
AIPC provides you with Flexible Course Delivery Modes
So YOU set the rules for how and when you learn...
 
AIPC’s accredited and nationally recognised Diploma of Counselling is designed so that you determine the manner and pace you study. You study entirely at your own pace (except of course if you’re receiving a government benefit such as Austudy) and you can start at any time, graduating in only 18-months.
 
Not only can you set the pace you study, you also determine the mode you want to study. You can study externally (at home with phone and email access to our counselling tutors); in-Class; online or any combination… all the time fully supported by our huge national team throughout our 8 Student Support Centres.
 
External learning means you can complete your entire course from the comfort of your home (or office, or overseas, or virtually anywhere). Your course comes complete with fully self-contained, referenced and professionally presented learning materials including 18 individual workbooks and readings. It really is as simple as working through the material and contacting us for support along the way. If you live locally to one of our support centres you can also attend tutorials to provide you with face to face contact if you wish (this option is ideal if you enjoy working more independently or have a busy schedule).
 
In-Class learning is a classroom forum where you learn with other students from a qualified lecturer. Classes are available in most main cities, at flexible times. In-Class is a great way for you to accelerate your learning, interact with other students and stay highly motivated. (This option is particularly suitable if you enjoy learning in the classroom environment with other students).
 
Online learning allows you to complete your learning entirely via your PC. You still receive all the high quality hardcopy resources (so you don’t miss out on anything!), but you’ll access all your learning materials and complete assessments online.
 
Any Combination. Of course you don’t have to stick with one learning method throughout your studies. You’re welcome to use whichever method suits your needs and desires at the time. You may choose to complete one workbook in-Class, another online, then externally. Whatever is most convenient!
 
Learn more - visit www.aipc.net.au/lz today!
 
Intomhss
 
Australia is suffering a Mental Health Crisis
 
Our suicide rate is now TWICE our road toll. Many suicides could possibly be averted, if only the people close to the victim were able to identify the early signs and appropriately intervene.
 
RIGHT NOW someone you care about – a family member, friend, or colleague – may be suffering in silence, and you don’t know.
 
With the right training, you can help that family member, friend or colleague.
 
Save $100 when you book your seat in an upcoming MHSS Workshop.
 
Upcoming workshops in June:
 
Gold Coast, QLD: 15 & 16 June
Lavington (Albury Wodonga), NSW: 19 & 20 June
Canning Vale, WA: 24 & 25 June
Coffs Harbour, NSW: 26 & 27 June
Launceston, TAS: 27 & 28 June
Gold Coast, QLD: 29 & 30 June
Brisbane (CBD), QLD: 29 & 30 June
Ferny Grove, QLD: 29 & 30 June
 
Book your seat now: www.mhss.net.au/find-a-course
 
Your registration includes the 2-day facilitated workshop; a hardcopy of the MHSS Student Workbook; and access to an online dashboard where you can obtain your certificate, watch role-play videos, and much more.
 
Endorsements
 
The Mental Health Social Support workshop is approved by several industry Associations for continuing professional development. Current endorsements include:
  • Australian Association of Social Workers: 14 CPD hours
  • Australian College of Mental Health Nurses: 14 CPE Points
  • Australian College of Midwives: 14 MidPLUS Points
  • Australian Community Workers Association: 5 CPE Points
  • Australian Counselling Association: 28 OPD Points
  • Australian Physiotherapy Association: 14 CPD Hours
  • Australian Practice Nurses Association: 14 CPD Hours
  • Royal College of Nursing, Australia: 12.5 CNE Points
MHSS Specialties
 
Once you complete the MHSS Core program you can undertake the MHSS Specialty Programs:
 
 
Book your seat at the next MHSS Workshop now and save $100.
 
If you have any queries, please contact Pedro Gondim on pedro@mhss.net.au.
 
Intocounselling
 
Case Study: Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
 
In a previous article we reviewed a range of treatments that are used to help clients suffering from obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). In this edition we showcase the case study of Darcy [fictional name], who worked with a psychologist to address the symptoms and history of her OCD.
 
Marian, a psychologist who specialised in anxiety disorders, closed the file and put it into the filing cabinet with a smile on her face. This time she had the satisfaction of filing it into the “Work Completed” files, for she had just today celebrated the final session with a very long-term client: Darcy Dawson. They’d come through a lot together, Darcy and Marian, during the twelve years of Darcy’s treatment for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, and they had had a particularly strong therapeutic alliance.
 
Marian reflected on the symptoms and history which had brought Darcy into her practice.
 
Obsessions at age nine
 
Now 37, Darcy reckoned that she had begun having obsessions around age nine, soon after her beloved grandma had died. Already grieving the loss of the person she was closest to in life, Darcy experienced further alienation – and resultant anxiety -- when her father relocated the family from the small town in Victoria where they lived to Melbourne. Adjusting to big-city life wasn’t easy for someone as anxious as Darcy, and she soon found that she was obsessing. She had fears of being hit by a speeding car if she stepped off the kerb. She feared that the new friends she began to develop in Melbourne would be kidnapped by bad people. And she was terrified that, if she didn’t do an elaborate prayer routine at night, all manner of terrible things would befall her family. 
 
The prayer routine, relatively simple at first, grew to gigantic proportions, containing many rules and restrictions. Darcy believed that she had to repeat each family member’s full name 15 times, say a sentence that asked for each person to be kept safe, promise God that she would improve herself, clap her hands 20 times for each person, kneel down and get up 5 times, and then put her hands into a prayer position while bowing. She “had” to do this routine at least 10 times each night, and if she made a mistake anywhere along the way, she had to start totally over again from the beginning, or else something bad would happen to her parents or little brother. Once she went flying to her mother’s side in the kitchen, tears streaming down her face, because she couldn’t get her “prayers” right. Darcy was certain that she was a huge disappointment to God and everybody.
 
Just like Granddad
 
Marian had asked Darcy if her parents were similar at all, and Darcy couldn’t think of many ways in which they were. Then she remembered something. “Ah,” she said, “my parents aren’t having these awful thoughts like me, but I remember my mum often telling me, ‘You’re just like your grandfather.’” Darcy’s grandfather had died when she was only five, so she didn’t have strong recollections of him, but there were two images that she always remembered about him: Grandfather standing by the kitchen sink in their farmhouse, washing his hands – always washing his hands. And if they decided to take a walk around the farm, he would take a seeming eternity to check that all the windows and doors were locked, even though they were on good terms with everyone within a ten-mile radius!
 
Obsessions and compulsions worsen through Uni
 
Marian had felt huge compassion for Darcy as she outlined the course that the disorder had taken. While the intrusive thoughts waxed during high-stress times and waned when Darcy felt relatively stable, there was nevertheless a general broadening of the obsessions – and resultant compulsion to do certain repetitive acts – throughout Darcy’s growing-up years. In high school, for instance, Darcy began to have an aversion to looking at any woman with a scoop-neck top on, going so far as to grab a glass and pretend to be holding it high up near her lips (as if to drink) if she had to talk to someone dressed in any but the most conservative top. In that way, she felt, she would be blocked from seeing what she should not see and thus sinning. Short skirts were also a problem, as Darcy feared that she was looking at people in inappropriate ways, and was offensive.
 
If anyone at a party crossed their legs while she was looking at them, Darcy assumed that they had done that because they were offended by her having glanced at them; she feared that they would think she was looking at their crotch area. She prayed constantly for forgiveness, but ended up ceasing hugs to family and friends because she felt like a hypocrite. Of course, not feeling that she could/should touch anyone made for huge social problems, and dating anyone became impossible: a huge punishment for a friendly extravert like Darcy.   She petitioned God relentlessly, asking to be a better, less sinful person. It did not seem to help.
 
When Darcy began University, the experience was defined by a series of irrational obsessions. She would worry incessantly about having written something offensive on an email or an assignment. Walking around campus, she would pick up rubbish: papers that she had never seen before; she would worry that she might have written something on one of them. She feared that she would accidentally hurt one of her fellow students by something that she might do or say. By this time Darcy was repeating certain phrases over and over again to ward off disaster. She was amazed that she was getting through school at all (she often made straight A’s), because her rampant perfectionism caused her to take at least twice as long as other students to complete assignments, and she still wasn’t happy then. The anxiety and depression were overwhelming Darcy to the point where she recognised that she could barely function and something needed to change.
 
The Uni psychologist says, “You’re fine”
 
Marian shook her head in amazement as she recalled how Darcy’s first attempts to find out what was wrong with her had been fruitless; all the health professionals had completely missed the OCD! Upon first coming to Marian, Darcy had recounted how getting along to the University psychologist in her senior year was a “non-event”. He had asked a few questions, chatted to her about her schoolwork, told her she was basically fine, and then told her to go see a psychiatrist, who merely prescribed a sleeping pill. Darcy had taken this, as instructed, because the intrusive thoughts in her mind often did keep her from sleeping, but when she was awake she still had the thoughts and the horrible compulsion to perform the anxiety-alleviating acts: routines which now occupied several hours each day. Moreover, Darcy’s parents still didn’t believe that anything was wrong with her; they even found it funny that she was “quirky” like her grandfather.
 
Age 25: Treatment begins
 
Darcy was to graduate and spend another three years being held prisoner by her out-of-control mind before a chance meeting of her mother with a specialist in OCD at a conference. The specialist didn’t live in Melbourne, but – by incredible coincidence – he had a highly recommended colleague who did: Marian. Marian recalled with some fondness how Darcy had sat in her office during the first session, shedding tears of joy at being truly “seen”: both as a person and in her disorder. When Marian had issued the magical words, “Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder”, Darcy had been surprised – after all, her sense of OCD was people who continually washed their hands – but she also felt like she had just been given the key to her prison. Her treatment began soon after. 
 
Marian worked intensively with Darcy at first, and then steadily. She helped Darcy get onto an even keel emotionally first by raising her serotonin levels (which had been quite low). Marian then began the laborious process of helping Darcy to change her habits of thinking: the assumptions that she made, the irrationalities that controlled her behaviour, and the intrusive obsessions that seemed to take over her life. Marian helped Darcy to see the importance of an exercise regimen, a good diet, and a stillness practice. Darcy joined an online support group, and Marian and Darcy enlisted the help of Darcy’s family and a few close friends. Partway through the therapy, Darcy was even able to come off the medications: a goal she had long sought, because she had married a “wonderful” man and they wanted to start a family.
 
Epilogue
 
At 37, Darcy is a happy and fulfilled person, with a solid marriage and an eight-year-old daughter. She believes that she worries about her “like a normal mother”, rather than in the obsessional way she used to pray in order to protect her family from imagined harm. She still petitions God, as she is active in her church, but now the petitions are free of the superstitious routines she used to perform, and she is quick to be thankful for her many blessings. 
 
Unwanted thoughts still come to her, but now she has tools to focus elsewhere, and when the intrusive thoughts come, Darcy knows how to keep them from causing her to repeat irrational acts in a compulsive way. She knows that she will probably always be managing her disorder, as there is no cure for OCD. But the difference now is that she controls it, rather than having it control her. As far as Darcy is concerned, Marian gave her back her life. 
 
Marian smiled again as she recalled Darcy’s journey and her original fear of being a “disappointment to God and everyone”. Indeed, Marian felt blessed to have had Darcy as a client.
 
This article is an extract of the upcoming Mental Health Academy “OCD and OCPD Case Studies” CPD course. More information: www.mentalhealthacademy.com.au
 
Join our community:
 
 
 
 
Help those around you suffering mental illness in silence: www.mhss.net.au
 
Intobookstore
 
The Institute has a list of recommended textbooks and DVDs that can add great value to your learning journey - and the good news is that you can purchase them very easily. The AIPC bookstore will give you discounted prices, an easy ordering method and quality guarantee!
 
This fortnight's feature is...
 
Name: Psychology: The Science of Behaviour, 7th edition
Authors: Carlson, Neil. R
AIPC Code: CARLSON
AIPC Price: $108.95 (RRP $129.95)
ISBN: 978-020-568-5578
 
This edition continues to treat the discipline as an experimental and natural science, combining a scholarly survey of research with applications of research results to problems that confront us today. Emphasizes psychology as a science.
 
To order this book, contact your Student Support Centreor the AIPC Head Office (1800 657 667).
 
Intoarticles
 
Treating Substance Addiction
 
Treating any type of substance abuse and substance addiction is challenging because they both have so many dimensions and they both disrupt so many aspects of the individual’s life. Effective treatment programs typically incorporate many components, each directed to a particular aspect of the condition and its consequences. Ultimately, treatments aspire to help the individual stop using substances in an abusive or addictive way which would usually entail maintenance of a drug-free lifestyle, and achieving a productive level of functioning in the family, at work, and in society.
 
Click here to continue reading this article.
 
 
Building Relationships with Step Children
 
One of the most common reasons for not-so-good step-family relationships is lack of communication. It is important to include the children in family processes such as formulating rules and new rituals. This is a great start! The next thing to do is to encourage communication. Talking is the best way to strengthen relationships, understand emotions and keep informed of what’s happening with the entire family. However, talking can sometimes have a negative effect if feelings are ignored or people are misinformed.
 
Click here to continue reading this article.
 
Other articles: www.aipc.net.au/articles
 
Intodevelopment
 
Mental Health Academy – First to Knowledge in Mental Health
 
Get UNLIMITED access to over 50 Hours ($3,160.00 value) of personal & professional development video workshops, and over 80 specialist courses, for just $39/month or $349/year.
 
We want you to experience unlimited, unrestricted access to the largest repository of personal and professional development programs available anywhere in the country.
 
When you join our new Premium Level membership, you’ll get all-inclusive access to over 40 video workshops (presented by some of the world’s leading mental health experts) valued at $3,160.00.
 
You’ll also get access to over 80 professionally-developed courses exploring a huge range of topics, including counselling interventions, communications skills, conflict, child development, mental health disorders, stress and trauma, relationships, ethics, reflective practice, plus much more. 
 
All courses and videos have been specially developed by psychologist and counsellor educators and are conveniently accessible online, 24/7. They’re filled with content that’ll help you understand your own life, and how to improve on your current condition.
 
Benefits of becoming a premium member:
  • Unlimited access to over 80 specialist courses
  • Unlimited access to over 40 videos ($3,160.00 value)
  • Videos presented by international experts
  • New programs released every month
  • Extremely relevant topics
  • Online, 24/7 access
  • Counsellors: Over 200 hours of ACA-approved OPD
  • Psychologists: Over 200 'active' CPD Hours
  • Social Workers: Over 200 AASW-endorsed CPD hours
Recently released and upcoming programs:
  • Play Therapy: Basics for Beginning Students
  • Understanding Will
  • Working with Will in the Therapy Room
  • Brief Counselling: The Basic Skills
  • Counselling Children: Brief Strategies
  • Overview of Principal Personality Tests (just released)
  • Understanding the MBTI (just released)
  • Sitting with Shadow (coming soon)
  • Client, Meet Your Shadow (coming soon)
  • Transference and Projection (coming soon)
  • Understanding Obsessives (coming soon)
  • OCD and OCPD Case Studies (coming soon)
  • Mindfulness (Coming Soon)
  • Managing Chronic Pain (Coming Soon)
  • Basic Stress Management (coming soon)
  • Coaching and Microcounselling (coming soon)
  • Group Microskills: Encountering Diversity (coming soon)
Learn more and join today: www.mentalhealthacademy.com.au/premium
 
Intoconnection
 
Have you visited the Counselling Connection Blog yet? There are over 600 interesting posts including case studies, profiles, success stories, videos and much more. Make sure you too get connected (and thank you for those who have already submitted comments and suggestions).
 
Counselling Older People with Alcohol Problems (book review)
 
Australia, like other developed countries, has a rapidly ageing population. Over the next 50 years the Australian Bureau of Statistic (2000) predicts that the number of older Australians is expected to increase to 6.5 million, representing approximately 25% of the total population. Whilst the use and abuse of alcohol amongst younger Australians is well documented through both research and the media, the incidence of alcohol use amongst older Australians is not so openly discussed. Alcohol-related deaths amongst Australian males peak in the 65 to 69 year age group, and in the 70 to 74 year age group for females (Chikritzhs, Jonas, Heale, Stockwell, Dietze, Hanlin, et al. 2000). With these considerations in mind, alcohol related issues are likely to increase in the elderly population.
 
Click here to read the full post.
 
Career Challenge Series, Part 5
 
One of the most common questions I have as a Career Coach and as and LCI workshop facilitator is, ‘How do I go about finding my ideal career?’
 
In this special post series we will sequentially cover each of these steps in more detail. In this post we cover step 5: Don’t let NO stop you.
 
Click here to read the full post.
 
Get new posts delivered by email! Visit our FeedBurner subscription page and click the link on the subscription box.
 
 
Intotwitter
 
Follow us on Twitter and get the latest and greatest in counselling news. To follow, visit http://twitter.com/counsellingnews and click "Follow".
 
Featured Tweets
 
Handouts from the Canadian Counselling and Psychotherapy Association (CCPA) 2013 Conference held earlier this month: http://www.ccpa-accp.ca/conference/handouts2013.php  
 
Are mental illnesses such as PMS and depression culturally determined? http://bit.ly/ZNgvCA
 
Unmasking the agony: Combat troops turn to art therapy: http://nbcnews.to/ZNgC15
 
Looking for counselling case studies and session transcripts? Visit our online library: http://bit.ly/17n9Dya
 
Lifestyle Interventions for Depression | Counselling Connection: http://bit.ly/17n9B9H
 
New research on divorce rates in AUS: http://bit.ly/11qEJku
 
Note that you need a Twitter profile to follow a list. If you do not have one yet, visit http://twitter.com to create a free profile today!
 
Tweet Count: 4,041
Follower Count: 5,832
 
Intoquotes
 
"The chief danger in life is that you may take too many precautions."
 
~ Alfred Adler
 
Intoseminars
 
Many students of the Diploma of Counselling attend seminars to complete the practical requirements of their course. Seminars provide an ideal opportunity to network with other students and liaise with qualified counselling professionals in conjunction with completing compulsory coursework.
 
Not sure if you need to attend Seminars? Click here for information on Practical Assessments.
 
Below are upcoming seminars available during the remainder of 2013.
 
To register for a seminar, please contact your Student Support Centre.
 
BRISBANE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 15/06, 10/08, 12/10, 07/12
Communication Skills II - 27/07, 28/09, 23/11
The Counselling Process - 29-30/06, 31/08-01/09, 30/11-01/12
Counselling Therapies I - 22-23/06, 21-22/09, 16-17/11
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/07, 19-20/10, 14-15/12
Case Management - 24-25/08, 02-03/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 16/06, 06/10
Counselling Applications - 13/07, 09/11
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 29-30/06, 31/08-01/09, 30/11-01/12
Communication Skills I - 15/06, 10/08, 12/10, 07/12
Communication Skills II - 27/07, 28/09, 23/11
Counselling Therapies I - 22-23/06, 21-22/09, 16-17/11
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/07, 19-20/10, 14-15/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 08/09, 24/11
Family Therapy - 07/06, 29/09, 08/12
 
GOLD COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 17/08, 16/11
Communication Skills II - 22/06, 21/09, 13/12
The Counselling Process - 19-20/07, 25-26/10, 07/12
Counselling Therapies I - 27-28/09
Counselling Therapies II - 22-23/11
Case Management - 18-19/10
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 02/08
Counselling Applications - 16/08
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 19-20/07, 25-26/10, 07/12
Communication Skills I - 17/08, 16/11
Communication Skills II - 22/06, 21/09, 13/12
Counselling Therapies I - 27-28/09
Counselling Therapies II - 22-23/11
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 14/06, 29/11
Family Therapy - 21/06, 16/08
Case Management - 18-19/10
 
MELBOURNE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 29/06, 27/07, 31/08, 28/09, 12/10, 23/11, 14/12
Communication Skills II - 30/06, 28/07, 01/09, 13/10, 24/11, 15/12
The Counselling Process - 21-22/06, 20-21/07 17-18/08, 13-14/09, 05-06/10, 16-17/11 06-07/12
Counselling Therapies I - 22-23/06, 20-21/07, 03-04/08, 21-22/09, 19-20/10, 30/11-01/12
Counselling Therapies II - 08-09/06, 06-07/07, 10-11/08, 07-08/09, 26-27/10, 07-08/12
Case Management - 15-16/06, 10-11/08, 04-05/10, 14-15/12
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 25/08, 20/09, 09/11
Counselling Applications - 14/07, 29/09, 10/11
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 21-22/06, 20-21/07 17-18/08, 13-14/09, 05-06/10, 16-17/11 06-07/12
Communication Skills I - 29/06, 27/07, 31/08, 28/09, 12/10, 23/11, 14/12
Communication Skills II - 30/06, 28/07, 01/09, 13/10, 24/11, 15/12
Counselling Therapies I - 22-23/06, 20-21/07, 03-04/08, 21-22/09, 19-20/10, 30/11-01/12
Counselling Therapies II - 08-09/06, 06-07/07, 10-11/08, 07-08/09, 26-27/10, 07-08/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 13/07, 15/09, 02/11
Family Therapy - 24/08, 08/11
Case Management - 15-16/06, 10-11/08, 04-05/10, 14-15/12
 
NORTHERN TERRITORY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 10/08, 02/11
Communication Skills II - 07/11, 30/11
The Counselling Process - 29-30-06, 28-29/09, 07-08/12
Counselling Therapies I - 20-21/07, 26-27/10
Counselling Therapies II - 24-25/08, 14-15/12
Case Management - 15-16/06, 23-24/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 13/07, 12/10
Counselling Applications - 17/08, 09/11
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 29-30/06, 28-29/09, 07-08/12
Communication Skills I - 10/08, 02/11
Communication Skills II - 01/06, 07/11, 30/11
Counselling Therapies I - 20-21/07, 26-27/10
Counselling Therapies II - 24-25/08, 14-15/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 06/07, 19/10
Family Therapy - 27-28/07, 16/11
Counselling Applications - 17/08, 09/11
 
SOUTH AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 29/06, 24/08, 26/10, 14/12
Communication Skills II - 30/06, 25/08, 27/10, 15/12
The Counselling Process - 03-04/08, 19-20/10, 30/11-01/12
Counselling Therapies I - 15-16/06, 21-22/09
Counselling Therapies II - 17-18/08, 23-24/11
Case Management - 31/08-01/09, 07-08/12
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 23/06, 14/09
Counselling Applications - 27/07, 12/10
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 03-04/08, 19-20/10, 30/11-01/12
Communication Skills I - 29/06, 24/08, 26/10, 14/12
Communication Skills II - 30/06, 25/08, 27/10, 15/12
Counselling Therapies I - 15-16/06, 21-22/09
Counselling Therapies II - 17-18/08, 23-24/11
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 28/07, 13/10
Family Therapy - 22/06, 15/09
Case Management - 31/08-01/09, 07-08/12
 
SUNSHINE COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 10/08, 16/11
Communication Skills II - 11/08, 17/11
The Counselling Process - 29-30/06, 21-22/09
Counselling Therapies I - 27-28/07
Counselling Therapies II - 19-20/10
Case Management - 15-16/06, 28-29/09
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 12/10
Counselling Applications - 13/07, 02/11
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 29-30/06, 21-22/09
Communication Skills I - 25/05, 10/08, 16/11
Communication Skills II - 26/05, 11/08, 17/11
Counselling Therapies I - 27-28/07
Counselling Therapies II - 19-20/10
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 24/08
Family Therapy - 08/06, 07/09
Case Management - 15-16/06, 28-29/09
 
SYDNEY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 22/06, 29/07, 24/08, 16/09, 18/10, 09/11, 13/12
Communication Skills II - 29/06, 30/07, 26/08, 17/09, 19/10, 18/11, 16/12
The Counselling Process - 20-21/06, 01-02/08, 22-23/08, 13-14/09, 03-04/10, 14-15/11, 06-07/12
Counselling Therapies I - 19-20/06, 19-20/07, 19-20/09, 22-23/11
Counselling Therapies II - 24-25/06, 15-16/08, 08-09/10, 09-10/12
Case Management - 26-27/07, 14-15/10, 17-18/12
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 15/07, 05/09, 25/11
Counselling Applications - 16/07, 06/09, 26/11
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 20-21/06, 01-02/08, 22-23/08, 13-14/09, 03-04/10, 14-15/11, 06-07/12
Communication Skills I - 22/06, 29/07, 24/08, 16/09, 18/10, 09/11, 13/12
Communication Skills II - 29/06, 30/07, 26/08, 17/09, 19/10, 18/11, 16/12
Counselling Therapies I - 19-20/06, 19-20/07, 19-20/09, 22-23/11
Counselling Therapies II - 24-25/06, 15-16/08, 08-09/10, 09-10/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 05/07, 27/09, 27/11
Family Therapy - 06/07, 28/09, 12/12
Case Management - 26-27/07, 14-15/10, 17-18/12
 
TASMANIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 04/08, 03/11
Communication Skills II - 01/09, 01/12
The Counselling Process - 29-30/06, 28-29/09, 07-08/12
Counselling Therapies I - 29-30/06, 28-29/09, 07-08/12
Counselling Therapies II - 24-25/08, 14-15/12
Case Management - 15-16/06, 23-24/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 14/07, 13/10
Counselling Applications - 18/08, 10/11
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 29-30/06, 28-29/09, 07-08/12
Communication Skills I - 04/08, 03/11
Communication Skills II - 01/09, 01/12
Counselling Therapies I - 29-30/06, 28-29/09, 07-08/12
Counselling Therapies II - 24-25/08, 14-15/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 21/07, 20/10
Family Therapy - 11/08, 17/11
Case Management - 15-16/06, 23-24/11
 
WESTERN AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 22/06, 06/07, 03/08, 14/09, 26/10, 07/12
Communication Skills II - 23/06, 07/07, 04/08, 15/09, 27/10, 08/12
The Counselling Process - 15-16/06, 13-14/07, 07-08/09, 05-06/10, 02-03/11
Counselling Therapies I - 08-09/06, 28-29/09, 23-24/11
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/07, 21-22/09 14-15/12
Case Management - 24-25/08, 09-10/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 12/10
Counselling Applications - 11/08, 16/11
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 15-16/06, 13-14/07, 07-08/09, 05-06/10, 02-03/11
Communication Skills I - 22/06, 06/07, 03/08, 14/09, 26/10, 07/12
Communication Skills II - 23/06, 07/07, 04/08, 15/09, 27/10, 08/12
Counselling Therapies I - 08-09/06, 28-29/09, 23-24/11
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/07, 21-22/09 14-15/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 31/08, 13/10
Family Therapy - 10/08, 17/11
Case Management - 24-25/08, 09-10/11
 
Important Note: Advertising of the dates above does not guarantee availability of places in the seminar. Please check availability with the respective Student Support Centre.
 
 
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