In this Issue

Hello!
Intobachelor
Intothediploma
Intomhss
Intocounselling
Intoteam
Intobookstore
Intoarticles
Intodevelopment
Intoconnection
Intotwitter
Intoquotes
Intoseminars

Contact us

Publications

Editor: Sandra Poletto
Email: ezine@aipc.net.au
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Copyright: 2012 Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors

Hello!
 
Welcome to Edition 177 of Institute Inbrief. In a three-part article series, we’ll explore how you (as a social supporter) can help families deal with transition by developing effective resilience skills. In each article we will address one out of three principal areas of focus which reinforce one another. In this edition, we specifically look at how you can help a family by supporting a positive self-concept.
 
Also in this edition:
  • Bachelor of Counselling and Psychological Science
  • MHSS Workshops – March & April
  • Articles and CPD updates
  • Blog and Twitter updates
  • Upcoming seminar dates
Enjoy your reading,
 
 
Editor.
 
 
Join our community:
 
 
 
 
Help those around you suffering mental illness in silence: www.mhss.net.au
 
Intobachelor
 
Become A Counsellor or Expand On Your Qualifications
With Australia’s Most Cost Effective & Flexible
 Bachelor of Counselling
 
AIPC is Australia’s largest and longest established educator of Counsellors. Over the past 22-years we’ve helped over 55,000 people from 27 countries pursue their dream of becoming a professional Counsellor.
 
The Bachelor of Counselling is a careful blend of theory and practical application. Theory is learnt through user-friendly learning materials that have been carefully designed to make your studies as accessible and conducive to learning as possible.
 
You can gain up to a full year’s academic credit (and save up to $8,700.00 with RPL) with a Diploma qualification. And with Fee-Help you don’t have to pay your subject fees upfront.
 
Here are some facts about the course:
  • Save up to $26,400.00 on your qualification.
  • Get started with NO MONEY DOWN using FEE-HELP.
  • Save up to $8,700.00 with RPL.
  • You will be supported by a large team of highly-qualified counselling professionals.
  • Study externally with individualised personal support.
  • Attend Residential Schools in Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane to hone your practical skills and network with other students.
You can learn more here: www.aipc.edu.au/degree
 
Watch our 2013 TV ad: www.aipc.net.au/tv2013
 
 
Become A Psychologist
 
Earn-While-You-Learn With Australia's
Best Value-for-Money & Flexible
Bachelor of Psychological Science
 
Psychology is one of the most versatile undergraduate courses, leading to many different career opportunities. And now there's a truly flexible way to get your qualification – with internal or external study options. It means working while you study is a realistic alternative.
 
Cost of living pressures and lifestyle choices are evolving the way we learn and Australian Institute of Psychology (AIP) is paving the way through flexible, innovative learning models:
  • Save up to $35,800 on your qualification.
  • Get started with NO MONEY DOWN with FEE-HELP.
  • Earn while you learn with flexible external learning options.
  • Be supported by a large team of highly-qualified Psychology professionals.
  • Study internally or externally with individualised personal support.
  • Enjoy a flexible and supportive learning experience.
  • Benefit from less onerous course entry requirements.
AIP is a registered Higher Education Provider with the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations, delivering a three-year Bachelor of Psychological Science. The Bachelor of Psychological Science is accredited by the Australian Psychology Accreditation Council (APAC), the body that sets the standards of training for Psychology education in Australasia.
 
APAC accreditation requirements are uniform across all universities and providers in the country, meaning that Australian Institute of Psychology, whilst a private Higher Education Provider, is required to meet exactly the same high quality standards of training, education and support as any university provider in the country.
 
You can learn more here: www.aip.edu.au/degree
 
Watch our 2013 TV ad: www.aip.edu.au/tv2013
 
Intothediploma
 
Imagine Being Passionate About Your Work
And Assisting People Every Day Lead Better Lives
 
 
It’s rare these days to hear people talk about their work with true passion. You hear so many stories of people working to pay the bills; putting up with imperfect situations; and compromising on their true desires.
 
That’s why it’s always so refreshing to hear regular stories from graduates living their dream to be a Counsellor. They’re always so full of energy, enthusiasm and passion. There’s no doubt that counselling is one of the most personally rewarding and enriching professions.
 
Just imagine someone comes to you for assistance. They’re emotionally paralysed by events in their life. They can’t even see a future for themselves. They can only focus on their pain and grief. The despair is so acute it pervades their entire life. Their relationship is breaking down and heading towards a divorce. They can’t focus on work and are getting in trouble with their boss. They feel they should be able to handle their problems alone, but know they can’t. It makes them feel helpless, worthless. Their self-esteem has never been lower. They’re caught in a cycle of destruction and pain.
 
Now imagine you have the knowledge and skills to help this person overcome their challenges. You assist to relieve their intense emotional pain. You give them hope for the future. You assist to rebuild their self-esteem and lead a satisfying, empowered life.
 
As a Counsellor you can experience these personal victories every day. And it’s truly enriching. There is nothing more fulfilling than helping another person overcome seemingly impossible obstacles.
 
Learn more here: www.aipc.net.au/lz
 
Intomhss
 
Australia is suffering a Mental Health Crisis
 
Our suicide rate is now TWICE our road toll. Many suicides could possibly be averted, if only the people close to the victim were able to identify the early signs and appropriately intervene.
 
RIGHT NOW someone you care about – a family member, friend, or colleague – may be suffering in silence, and you don’t know.
 
With the right training, you can help that family member, friend or colleague.
 
Save $100 when you book your seat in an upcoming MHSS Workshop.
 
Upcoming workshops:
 
Robina (Gold Coast), QLD: 23 & 24 March
Narre Warren, VIC: 4 & 5 April
Canning Vale, WA: 8 & 9 April
Fortitude Valley, QLD: 20 & 21 April
Glandore, SA: 20 & 21 April
Robina (Gold Coast), QLD: 20 & 21 April
 
Book your seat now: www.mhss.net.au/find-a-course
 
Your registration includes the 2-day facilitated workshop; a hardcopy of the MHSS Student Workbook; and access to an online dashboard where you can obtain your certificate, watch role-play videos, and much more.
 
MHSS Specialties
 
Once you complete the MHSS Core program you can undertake the MHSS Specialty Programs:
  1. Aiding Addicts;
  2. Supporting those with Depression or Anxiety;
  3. Supporting the Suicidal and Suicide Bereaved and;
  4. Supporting Challenged Families.
Book your seat at the next MHSS Workshop now and save $100.
 
If you have any queries, please contact Pedro Gondim on pedro@mhss.net.au.
 
PS Members of the ACA can accrue 28 OPD points by attending the MHSS Workshop.
 
Intocounselling
 
Helping Families Enhance Resilience (Part 1 of 3)
 
The following 3-article series explores how you (as a person providing social support) can help families deal with transition by developing effective resilience skills.
 
Resilient families may be defined by a number of characteristics, or categories of resilience. Some of these characteristics are:
  • The atmosphere of the family
  • Collaborative problem-solving and conflict resolution
  • Orientation to the wider community
  • Support for individual development
  • Effective communication and relationship skills
  • Nurturing behaviours, enriching time together
  • Clear family structures, legitimate authority
  • A congruent family story
  • Creating “we-ness”: a mutuality of concern
  • Creation of supportive and celebratory rituals
  • Strong meaning, purpose, and values, with room for the transcendent
If you are supporting a family in transition, you may perceive huge differences between them and the characteristics named above as belonging to resilient families. If so, you may be wondering: “So how do I help move my struggling family down the continuum towards greater functionality?” In these series we will address three principal areas of focus, which reinforce one another:
  1. Supporting a positive self-concept
  2. Encouraging effective parenting
  3. Creating supportive contexts
Any assessment you might make of your supported family would do well to include an examination of both protective traits (those factors which you realise are helping them to be more resilient) and also risk traits (those factors which are making it more difficult for them to respond with resilience). A thorough assessment, and any action plan developed from that, should look at individual, family, and also community factors (roughly relating to the three areas above).
 
Supporting a positive self-concept
 
Encouraging success; acknowledging accomplishments: Few would argue that those who perceive themselves as successful and competent will find it easier to maintain a positive self-concept, or that those who feel somehow “failed” or incompetent will find that same self-concept elusive. But what constitutes “success” for one person may be different from what another considers success. And in times of big change in a family, the roles, responsibilities, and ways of being that the members enacted before the change may no longer be relevant or valid. Making the same response to a situation as before may now generate a very different result, with the consequence that members may feel “all at sea”: ineffective with current options for response, but not knowing how to respond to the new challenges effectively.
 
Too, preoccupation with transitions in a family may mean that the adults – the primary validators – are unavailable to help acknowledge their children’s accomplishments. For all members, but especially for children, the positive but fragile self-concept that they may have been individually holding for a long time can be quickly undermined.
 
As a support person, you can have a major role in establishing dialogue with various members to ascertain in which areas they now feel challenged, and which achievements within the family or their outer world would help them to feel successful. You can help them to move towards those successes, acknowledging accomplishments that have occurred along the way. Your role as a modeller of validation can help parents, especially, to understand the importance of continuing to find the time/energy to notice and affirm their children.
 
The crucial thing to note is that, because perceptions of “success” and “accomplishment” can be so subjective, it is important to affirm people for those things that they value, especially in themselves. Otherwise, the validation is likely to feel hollow and be ineffective. Particularly in the case of major absence, such as with FIFO (fly-in, fly-out) or non-custodial parents post-divorce, it is crucial to help the “part-time” parent creatively find ways to emphasise validation when they are home. It will involve them in searching for strengths.
 
Searching for strengths:When a family is under siege from change, it may be difficult for its members to spot strengths that they have used to cope with the new situation. For example, in the case of a couple divorcing, their ten-year-old daughter may be attuned to her powerlessness to change the fact of Mum and Dad arguing, or Dad going away. As support person, you may be able to help her see that, while preventing the divorce was not within her capabilities, she did much to support the family’s resilience by continuing to do well in school despite all the chaos, and she used both wisdom and compassion in managing to not judge either parent, but continuing to cooperate with both of them.
 
A new stepmother, similarly, may be validated because she has managed to befriend her new husband’s children: striking that delicate balance between being available as a friend/adviser, but leaving the major discipline to their father. In the chaos of the transition to a remarried family, she may feel overwhelmed and not be giving herself credit for her relational and diplomacy skills. Because we are taught not to “blow our own horn”, you may find that you are able to more easily find hidden strengths in family members by inviting members to help you spot strengths in one another.
 
Encouraging compassion: When our world turns upside down, it is normal to want to “put things right” and get as quickly as possible back to normal. It often seems that figuring out who is to blame and punishing the offending party will allow normalcy to be restored. When a family is thrown into disarray through transition to a new state, however, what is needed is an extra dose of compassion. Yet an empathetic stance is often one of the earliest victims of change. Your role as helper and support person may be invaluable in encouraging members to reframe what has happened or how they are feeling, to see things in a more compassionate light.
 
For example, with school-age children adjusting to their FIFO father’s new long-term absences, there may be hurt or disappointment that, when Dad does come home, he is grumpy and tired for a day or two. You may be able to help the children recall a time when they were so tired that they practically couldn’t eat, let alone do anything else, and all they wanted was to drift off to sleep – or else they just wanted to punch their little brother, for no particular reason! Helping them to understand their father’s fatigue empathetically may also reduce feelings of rejection or invalidation that Dad isn’t more available; they may be more willing to let go of the urge to take Dad’s bad mood personally. You can also coach the children’s mother, if that is your principal liaison in the family, to ensure that she can work with the children on this.
 
In the case of families changing membership (new lone-parent families and heterosexual and gay/lesbian remarried families), there is an ever-present need to advocate for compassion for all of the members. Parents and teachers may complain that children are acting out, but a quiet non-judgmental session listening to the children is likely to reveal a sizable measure of unprocessed grief about the changes that they do not know how to express. Boundaries and rules must still be respected (i.e., homework must still be completed, hitting a sibling must still be resisted), but with the illuminating lens of compassion, all parties can work towards helping the members – especially the young members – find a way to work through feelings, thereby restoring good behaviour and more important, a good self-concept.
 
Changing negative self-talk: Just as helpers may be able to assist a troubled family member in reframing his or her stance to a more compassionate one, so we as support people may be able to help individuals reframe their self-talk to be more positive and affirming. Particularly when things seem to be exploding in the family, it is easy to begin giving negative messages to oneself which undermine both self-concept and also one’s capacity to resourcefully deal with crises. In a newly-formed stepfamily, for example, a child may find it easy to criticise himself, comparing himself to a similar-aged stepsibling who seems to have it all and be able to do it all. In this case, any self-talk such as, “Jim seems to be so talented; I can’t really do anything special” could be reframed as, “Jim is really talented, but I have my places of skill, too.”
 
In the case of new lone-parent families due to divorce, children often blame themselves, believing that if they had only been more obedient or helpful, they could have prevented the divorce. As support person, you can give such children – and through them the whole family – a priceless gift by picking up on such a dynamic, and re-routing their thinking. If negative self-talk seems to be running through your supported family (or to prevent it doing so), you may wish to encourage the parent(s) to initiate a “brag session”, say at dinner, in which everyone is invited to name something that happened during the day which helped them to feel good about themselves (children can be helped to understand which of those items probably need to remain within the family, and shouldn’t be talked about outside it). As support person, you can work with parents to help them catch negative self-talk on the part of their children and encourage them to gently invite the children to reframe statements.
 
In the next article in these series we explore how you can help move a struggling family down the continuum towards greater functionality by encouraging effective parenting.
 
This article was adapted from the Mental Health Social Support (MHSS) Specialty Program “Supporting Challenged Families”. For more information, visit www.mhss.net.au.
 
Join our community:
 
 
 
 
Intoteam
 
Seònaid Linn
 
Course Developer (AIP)
 
Seònaid obtained her BSc in Psychology (Hons) from University of Stirling, Scotland in 2008. Having completed her final year dissertation thesis on the linguistic phenomenon of ‘grapheme-colour Synaesthesia’, Seònaid developed a keen interest in phenomenology and subjectivity. Following her undergraduate degree, Seònaid spent the next three years working in a mixture of administration, marketing, community arts, and the employment sector as well as travelling in South East Asia and Australia.
 
After falling in love with Brisbane, Seònaid is now enrolled at University of Queensland in a Research Higher Degree programme carrying out participatory action research on peer support and subjectivity with a particular focus on women and ‘artivism’. Seònaid has a passion for community critical psychology, qualitative methodologies and working from social constructionist and feminist standpoints.
 
At the Australian Institute of Psychology, Seònaid is currently working on course development for the new undergraduate Bachelor of Psychological Science degree incorporating critical perspectives and innovative teaching practices into subject material. Free time is now a rarity for Seònaid but in its occurrence, she enjoys trips to the beach, music festivals and photography.
 
 
Intobookstore
 
The Institute has a list of recommended textbooks and DVDs that can add great value to your learning journey - and the good news is that you can purchase them very easily. The AIPC bookstore will give you discounted prices, an easy ordering method and quality guarantee!
 
This fortnight's feature is...
 
Name: Current Psychotherapies, 9th Edition
Authors: Raymond J. Corsini, Danny Wedding
AIPC Code: COROSINI
AIPC Price: $119.70 (RRP $142.95)
ISBN: 978-049-590-3369
 
Current Psychotherapies provides students of counselling psychology and social work with an authoritative treatment of the major systems of psychotherapy. One of the most widely used textbooks in its field for more than twenty years.
 
To order this book, contact your Student Support Centre or the AIPC Head Office (1800 657 667).
 
Intoarticles
 
Behaviour and Solution Focused Couple Therapy
 
The practice of couple therapy has been encouraged to incorporate a more scientific model of practice and the use of research to inform the style of therapy most appropriate to use (Whiting & Crane, 2003). As a result, the discipline of couple and family counselling is moving to an evidence based focus.
 
A number of theoretical frameworks have attempted to conceptualise dyadic relationships. Some of these theories have become foundations for the interventions that have become common in couple’s therapy today. Some of the models and theories include the strategic model, emotion focused therapy, solution focused therapy, behaviour theory and attachment theory. In this article we overview two of these approaches.
 
Click here to continue reading this article.
 
 
Counsellors vs Workplace Harassment
 
To effectively counsel a client who has been the target of workplace harassment it is helpful to have an understanding of relevant legislation. The following is an extract from the Queensland Government Department of Employment and Industrial Relations (it is recommended that counsellors from other states and territories check their relevant legislation).
 
Click here to continue reading this article.
 
Other articles: www.aipc.net.au/articles
 
Intodevelopment
 
Mental Health Academy – First to Knowledge in Mental Health
 
Get UNLIMITED access to over 50 Hours ($3,160.00 value) of personal & professional development video workshops, and over 80 specialist courses, for just $39/month or $349/year.
 
We want you to experience unlimited, unrestricted access to the largest repository of personal and professional development programs available anywhere in the country.
 
When you join our new Premium Level membership, you’ll get all-inclusive access to over 40 video workshops (presented by some of the world’s leading mental health experts) valued at $3,160.00.
 
You’ll also get access to over 80 professionally-developed courses exploring a huge range of topics, including counselling interventions, communications skills, conflict, child development, mental health disorders, stress and trauma, relationships, ethics, reflective practice, plus much more. 
 
All courses and videos have been specially developed by psychologist and counsellor educators and are conveniently accessible online, 24/7. They’re filled with content that’ll help you understand your own life, and how to improve on your current condition.
 
Benefits of becoming a premium member:
  • Unlimited access to over 80 specialist courses
  • Unlimited access to over 40 videos ($3,160.00 value)
  • Videos presented by international experts
  • New programs released every month
  • Extremely relevant topics
  • Online, 24/7 access
  • Counsellors: Over 150 hours of ACA-approved OPD
  • Psychologists: Over 150 'active' CPD Hours
Recently released and upcoming programs:
  • Narcissism: The Basics
  • Treating Narcissism In and Around Your Clients
  • Case Studies in Narcissism
  • Fostering Resilience in Clients
  • Principles of Psychosynthesis
  • Working with Subpersonalities
  • Understanding Will (developed and releasing soon)
  • Working with Will in the Therapy Room (developed and releasing soon)
  • Overview of Principal Personality Tests (developed and releasing soon)
  • The Chakra Model of Development (developed and releasing soon)
  • Understanding the MBTI (Myers-Briggs Type Inventory) (coming soon)
  • Keegan's Developmental Sequence (coming soon)
  • Understanding and Recognising Shadow in the Therapy Room (coming soon)
  • Decoding transference (coming soon)
  • Basic Stress Management (coming soon)
  • Brief Counselling: The Basic Skills (coming soon)
  • Coaching and Microcounselling (coming soon)
  • Counselling Children: Brief Strategies (coming soon)
  • Group Microskills: Encountering Diversity (coming soon)
  • Neuroscience: The Cutting Edge of Counselling's Future (coming soon)
  • Play Therapy: Basics for Beginning Students (coming soon)
Learn more and join today: www.mentalhealthacademy.com.au/premium
 
Intoconnection
 
Have you visited the Counselling Connection Blog yet? There are over 600 interesting posts including case studies, profiles, success stories, videos and much more. Make sure you too get connected (and thank you for those who have already submitted comments and suggestions).
 
Silver-lining thinking and resilience
 
The optimism skill of silver-lining thinking goes hand in hand with avoiding what researchers have called “focusing illusions” (Schkade and Kahneman, 1987). It is about acknowledging the dark clouds (say, impending divorce or diagnosis of an incurable condition), but refusing to give an inappropriate amount of attention (focus) to certain feared aspects of the “cloud”, concentrating instead on the silver lining in the clouds: some aspects of the situation that may be positive, despite the overall tough circumstance.
 
An example of this occurred in the late 1980s, when getting AIDS was pretty much a death sentence. On an “AIDS Road Show” set up to promote safe sex, one of the AIDS patients participating was asked how he was managing to live so cheerfully and with such obvious happiness, given his condition. “Oh,” he said, “that’s easy. I – and many others with AIDS – know that our time may be limited, so we just let the rubbish go by.”
 
Click here to read the full post.
 
Get new posts delivered by email! Visit our FeedBurner subscription page and click the link on the subscription box.
 
 
Intotwitter
 
Follow us on Twitter and get the latest and greatest in counselling news. To follow, visit http://twitter.com/counsellingnews and click "Follow".
 
Featured Tweets
 
New on MindScience TV: Interview with Pieter Rossouw PhD (Australia) - researcher and neuroscience educator: http://www.mindscienceinstitute.com/mstv.htm
 
News and information about the emerging field of Neuropsychotherapy and its community of professionals: http://www.neuropsychotherapist.com
 
Do you want to enhance your life skills? Then visit our blog to access our range of free Life Effectiveness Guides: http://www.counsellingconnection.com/index.php/resources/
 
AIPC Article Library » The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI): http://www.aipc.net.au/articles/?p=355
 
No Attention-Boosting Drugs for Healthy Kids, Doctors Urge: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130313182022.htm
 
 
E-therapy, equality and access: http://www.therapytoday.net/article/show/3541/
 
Note that you need a Twitter profile to follow a list. If you do not have one yet, visit http://twitter.com to create a free profile today!
 
Tweet Count: 3,926
Follower Count: 5,645
 
Intoquotes
 
"One of the oldest human needs is having someone to wonder where you are when you don't come home at night."
 
~ Margaret Mead
 
Intoseminars
 
Many students of the Diploma of Counselling attend seminars to complete the practical requirements of their course. Seminars provide an ideal opportunity to network with other students and liaise with qualified counselling professionals in conjunction with completing compulsory coursework.
 
Not sure if you need to attend Seminars? Click here for information on Practical Assessments.
 
Below are upcoming seminars available during the first semester of 2013. For a full list of seminars, visit http://www.aipc.net.au/timetables.php.
 
To register for a seminar, please contact your Student Support Centre.
 
BRISBANE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 06/04, 15/06
Communication Skills II - 23/03, 18/05
The Counselling Process - 27-28/04, 29-30/06
Counselling Therapies I - 22-23/06
Counselling Therapies II - 13-14/04
Case Management - 25-26/05
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 16/06
Counselling Applications - 24/03
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 27-28/04, 29-30/06
Communication Skills I - 06/04, 15/06
Communication Skills II - 23/03, 18/05
Counselling Therapies I - 22-23/06
Counselling Therapies II - 13-14/04
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 02/06
Family Therapy - 07/04, 07/06
Case Management - 25-26/05
 
GOLD COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 25/05
Communication Skills II - 26/05
The Counselling Process - 29-30/06
Counselling Therapies II - 18-19/05
Case Management - 15-16/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 20/04
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 29-30/06
Communication Skills I - 25/05
Communication Skills II - 26/05
Counselling Therapies II - 18-19/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 06/04
Family Therapy - 08/06
Case Management - 15-16/06
 
MELBOURNE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 27/04, 18/05, 29/06
Communication Skills II - 28/04, 19/05, 30/06
The Counselling Process - 22-23/03, 20-21/04, 25-26/05, 21-22/06
Counselling Therapies I - 13-14/04, 04-05/05, 22-23/06
Counselling Therapies II - 06-07/04, 18-19/05, 08-09/06
Case Management - 13-14/04, 15-16/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 24/03, 02/06
Counselling Applications - 12/05
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 22-23/03, 20-21/04, 25-26/05, 21-22/06
Communication Skills I - 27/04, 18/05, 29/06
Communication Skills II - 28/04, 19/05, 30/06
Counselling Therapies I - 13-14/04, 04-05/05, 22-23/06
Counselling Therapies II - 06-07/04, 18-19/05, 08-09/06
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 11/05
Case Management - 13-14/04, 15-16/06
 
NORTHERN TERRITORY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 11/05
Communication Skills II - 01/06
The Counselling Process - 23-24/03, 29-30-06
Counselling Therapies I - 23-24/02
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/04
Case Management - 15-16/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 06/04
Counselling Applications - 20/05
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 23-24/03, 29-30-06
Communication Skills I - 11/05
Communication Skills II - 01/06
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/04
Family Therapy - 27/4
Counselling Applications - 20/05
 
SOUTH AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 13/04, 29/06
Communication Skills II - 14/04, 30/06
The Counselling Process - 06-07/04, 01-02/06
Counselling Therapies I - 15-16/06
Counselling Therapies II - 18-19/05
Case Management - 25-26/05
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 23/06
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 06-07/04, 01-02/06
Communication Skills I - 13/04, 29/06
Communication Skills II - 14/04, 30/06
Counselling Therapies I - 15-16/06
Counselling Therapies II - 18-19/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 23/03
Family Therapy - 22/06
Case Management - 25-26/05
 
SUNSHINE COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 18/05
Communication Skills II - 22/06
The Counselling Process - 26-27/04
Counselling Therapies I - 22-23/03
Counselling Therapies II - 24-25/05
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 26-27/04
Communication Skills I - 18/05
Communication Skills II - 16/03, 22/06
Counselling Therapies I - 22-23/03
Counselling Therapies II - 24-25/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 14/06
Family Therapy - 21/06
 
SYDNEY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 22/03, 19/04, 20/05, 22/06
Communication Skills II - 23/03, 26/04, 21/05, 29/06
The Counselling Process - 08-09/04, 29-30/04, 17-18/05, 20-21/06
Counselling Therapies I - 10-11/05, 19-20/06
Counselling Therapies II - 11-12/04, 24-25/06
Case Management - 03-04/05
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 08-09/04, 29-30/04, 17-18/05, 20-21/06
Communication Skills I - 22/03, 19/04, 20/05, 22/06
Communication Skills II - 23/03, 26/04, 21/05, 29/06
Counselling Therapies I - 10-11/05, 19-20/06
Counselling Therapies II - 11-12/04, 24-25/06
Family Therapy - 07/05
Case Management - 03-04/05
 
TASMANIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 05/05
Communication Skills II - 02/06
The Counselling Process - 23-24/03, 29-30/06
Counselling Therapies I - 29-30/06
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/04
Case Management - 15-16/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 07/04
Counselling Applications - 19/05
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 23-24/03, 29-30/06
Communication Skills I - 05/05
Communication Skills II - 02/06
Counselling Therapies I - 29-30/06
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/04
Family Therapy - 28/04  
Case Management - 15-16/06
 
WESTERN AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 25/05, 22/06
Communication Skills II - 26/05, 23/06
The Counselling Process - 13-14/04, 11-12/05, 15-16/06
Counselling Therapies I - 06-07/04, 08-09/06
Counselling Therapies II - 04-05/05
Case Management - 18-19/05
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 21/04
Counselling Applications - 23/03
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 13-14/04, 11-12/05, 15-16/06
Communication Skills I - 25/05, 22/06
Communication Skills II - 26/05, 23/06
Counselling Therapies I - 06-07/04, 08-09/06
Counselling Therapies II - 04-05/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 01/06
Family Therapy - 20/04
Case Management - 18-19/05
 
Important Note: Advertising of the dates above does not guarantee availability of places in the seminar. Please check availability with the respective Student Support Centre.
 
 
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