In this Issue

Hello!
Intothediploma
Intomhss
Intojobs
Intocommunity
Intocounselling
Intobookstore
Intoarticles
Intodevelopment
Intoconnection
Intotwitter
Intoquotes
Intoseminars

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Editor: Sandra Poletto
Email: ezine@aipc.net.au
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Copyright: 2012 Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors

Hello!
Welcome to Edition 167 of Institute Inbrief. How can you best offer support to someone who is bereaved by suicide? What attitudes, translated into caring actions, can best facilitate the bereaved person’s coping in the immediate and short term, and their healing in the longer term? In this edition’s featured article we explore the above, and more.
 
Also in this edition:
  • Job Opportunity
  • MHSS Workshops
  • Lert – Our Social Responsibility Program
  • Previously Published Articles
  • Blog and Twitter updates
  • Upcoming seminar dates
If you would like to access daily articles & resources, and interact with over 5100 peers, join our Facebook community today: www.facebook.com/counsellors. It is a great way to stay in touch and share your interest and knowledge in counselling.
 
Enjoy your reading,
 
 
Editor
 
 
Join our community:
 
 
Help those around you suffering mental illness in silence: www.mhss.net.au
 
Intothediploma
 
AIPC provides you with Flexible Course Delivery Modes
So YOU set the rules for how and when you learn...
 
AIPC’s accredited and nationally recognised Diploma of Counselling is designed so that you determine the manner and pace you study. You study entirely at your own pace (except of course if you’re receiving a government benefit such as Austudy) and you can start at any time, graduating in only 18-months.
 
Not only can you set the pace you study, you also determine the mode you want to study. You can study externally (at home with phone and email access to our counselling tutors); in-Class; online or any combination… all the time fully supported by our huge national team throughout our 8 Student Support Centres.
 
External learning means you can complete your entire course from the comfort of your home (or office, or overseas, or virtually anywhere). Your course comes complete with fully self-contained, referenced and professionally presented learning materials including 18 individual workbooks and readings. It really is as simple as working through the material and contacting us for support along the way. If you live locally to one of our support centres you can also attend tutorials to provide you with face to face contact if you wish (this option is ideal if you enjoy working more independently or have a busy schedule).
 
In-Class learning is a classroom forum where you learn with other students from a qualified lecturer. Classes are available in most main cities, at flexible times. In-Class is a great way for you to accelerate your learning, interact with other students and stay highly motivated. (This option is particularly suitable if you enjoy learning in the classroom environment with other students).
 
Online learning allows you to complete your learning entirely via your PC. You still receive all the high quality hardcopy resources (so you don’t miss out on anything!), but you’ll access all your learning materials and complete assessments online.
 
Any Combination. Of course you don’t have to stick with one learning method throughout your studies. You’re welcome to use whichever method suits your needs and desires at the time. You may choose to complete one workbook in-Class, another online, then externally. Whatever is most convenient!
 
Learn more - visit www.aipc.net.au/lz today!
 
Watch inspirational stories from some of our Graduates: www.aipc.net.au/gradvideo
 
Hear what Employers say about our Graduates: www.aipc.net.au/employervids
 
Intomhss
 
Learn crucial social support skills
 
RIGHT NOW someone you care about – a family member, friend, or colleague – may be suffering in silence, and you don’t know.
 
Our suicide rate is now TWICE our road toll. Many suicides could possibly be averted, if only the people close to the victim were able to identify the early signs and appropriately intervene.
 
With the right training, you can help that family member, friend or colleague.
 
Save $100 when you book your seat in an upcoming MHSS Workshop:
 
Canning Vale, WA: 18-19/09/12 – REGISTER HERE
Berwick Area, VIC: 27-28/09/12 – REGISTER HERE
Parramatta, NSW: 08-09/10/12 – REGISTER HERE
Hobart, TAS: 09-10/10/12 – REGISTER HERE
Fortitude Valley, QLD: 13-14/10/12 – REGISTER HERE
 
Other dates and locations: www.mhss.net.au/find-a-course
 
Your registration includes the 2-day facilitated workshop; a hardcopy of the MHSS Student Workbook; and access to an online dashboard where you can obtain your certificate, watch role-play videos, and much more.
 
MHSS Specialties
 
Once you complete the MHSS Core program you can undertake the MHSS Specialty Programs:
  1. Aiding Addicts;
  2. Supporting those with Depression or Anxiety;
  3. Supporting the Suicidal and Suicide Bereaved and;
  4. Supporting Challenged Families.
Book your seat at the next MHSS Workshop now and save $100.
 
If you have any queries, please contact Pedro Gondim on pedro@mhss.net.au.
 
PS Members of the ACA can accrue 28 OPD points by attending the MHSS Workshop.
 
Intojobs
 
Position Available – Education Adviser
 
The Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors (AIPC) is a registered training organisation (RTO) specialising in counsellor education. We are Australia's longest established counsellor education provider and are proud of our reputation in the marketplace.
 
AIPC offers external courses in counselling and life coaching. AIPC has 8 branches throughout Australia with students studying via distance education in all states and from overseas.
 
We currently seek to appoint two part-time Education Advisers each working 2 or 3 days per week at our Head Office in Fortitude Valley, Brisbane. The position involves providing academic support via telephone & email to students completing our external training courses, plus marking assignments & practical video assessments.
 
Applications need to address the following selection criteria:
  • Minimum education level of a Diploma of Counselling, however, degree level qualifications in Counselling, Psychology or a related field are preferable.
  • Certificate IV in Assessment & Workplace Training (or willingness to obtain within 3 months of employment).
  • A minimum 2 years counselling experience (voluntary or paid).
  • A desire to work in a training environment.
  • Well-developed communication & interpersonal skills.
  • Computer literacy.
Applications will be assessed on a first-in basis.
 
Please send application including CV to:
 
Anel Hough
Training Coordinator
AIPC
Locked Bag 15
Fortitude Valley QLD 4006
Or email: anel@aipc.net.au 
 
Intocommunity
 
“Be Alert... The World Needs More Lerts”
 
Lert is a national organisation of members – everyday folk – that are collectively interested in supporting our communities understand and overcome the issues of mental health.
 
Lerts are not necessarily mental health professionals. Anyone can be a Lert. Lerts are ordinary folk with an extraordinary vision of dramatically reducing the onset of mental illness through early intervention, education and community engagement.
 
Lerts share a willingness to help their communities and workplaces address the systemic problem of mental illness. They’re involved in educating their communities and workplaces about mental illness, breaking down stigma’s, implementing early intervention models, promoting support structures and much more.
 
Lerts:
  • Are sensitive to the mental health wellbeing of their family, friends and community.
  • Provide a social support through provision of education and awareness.
  • Can deliver mental health related training.
  • Can act as Lert Officers in their workplace.
  • Can be trained in Mental Health Social Support to act as a conduit of support and referral.
  • Can join and operate local Chapters to influence mental health services and education in their community.
  • Engage with local ‘centres of influence’ such as workplaces, community centres, schools, Medicare Locals, GP’s and primary health centres, and more.
  • Network with health professionals and support structures.
  • Undertake awareness programs.
  • Plus much more.
Learn more and join Lert today: www.lert.com.au/lz 
 
Like Lert Facebook here: www.facebook.com/RUaLert
Follow Lert Twitter here: www.twitter.com/RUaLert
 
Intocounselling
 
A Guide to Helping the Suicide-Bereaved
 
How can you best offer support to someone who is bereaved by suicide? What attitudes, translated into caring actions, can best facilitate the bereaved person’s coping in the immediate and short term, and their healing in the longer term?
 
Because of the remaining societal stigma and also the lack of knowledge about how to be with the suicide-bereaved in a sensitive way, many friends and even family members simply avoid the situation – including the bereaved person – altogether. So how can you help? What is your best role as support person? Below is a guide to clarify what you can do to help the suicide-bereaved.  
 
Accept the intense, back-and-forward nature of grieving
 
Because grief from suicide is more complicated than grief from other death, survivors need more time to work through the experience. Their task is to reconcile themselves to the new reality. They may be going along, and you and they both think that they are making progress, then: BANG! They get hit with sudden, uncontrollable intense emotions; guilt fear, shame, rejection, sadness, and anger may explode all at once – sometimes when they least expect it.
 
Your urge may be to tell them to “get over it.” In a way, they never will; the death will always be part of their experience. What is more helpful is to listen to the explosion of emotions with patience, compassion, and understanding, truly accepting what they are dealing with.
 
Listen with your heart
 
Your help begins with your physical presence and your active, non-judgmental listening; these aid in breaking down the barrier of silence that stalls survivors’ healing. Your supported person might relate a story about the death – and then relate it again, and again and again… Listening attentively each time helps to progress your person’s healing.
 
Your urge could be to worry about what you will say, trying very hard to “get it right”. What is more helpful is to focus on what is being shared with you, resting in the knowledge that you do not need to have the answers, just the ability to acknowledge the pain, the feelings, and the questions.
 
Avoid clichés and simplistic explanations
 
Some words and phrases will be experienced by survivors as extremely painful. Use of clichéd phrases such as “He’s in a better place now” or “Think of all that you have to be grateful for” do nothing to help the survivor. Minimising or trivialising their experience may help to lessen the pain for you, but that is not why you are there. Offering simplistic explanations or statements with a veiled judgment in them make your friend’s journey through grief more difficult. Even saying supposedly positive things, such as “You’re coping very well with this” have a tendency to restrict the freedom your supported person may feel to express what is really happening with them.
 
Your urge may be to say something like, “She was out of her mind” or “It was an insane thing to do.” Again, this may serve your needs (providing some way of making meaning, perhaps?). It does not help the survivor. What is more helpful is to encourage the survivor’s own search for meaning and understanding.
 
Be compassionate
 
You do not know exactly how your supported person is feeling (they can teach you), but in allowing your friend the full spectrum of experience – as intense and difficult as it may be for both of you to be present for that – you are helping without judgment, criticism, or expectation of how they “should” heal. You are truly walking “beside” them, rather than “in front” or “behind”.
 
Your urge could be to say “I know just how you feel.” You don’t; don’t ever say that. What is more helpful is to become the learner here, not the teacher.
 
Respect the need to grieve
 
Because of the stigma we have spoken about, the nature of a suicide death is sometimes kept secret. Wounds that are not allowed the light of day are wounds that are very slow to heal. If the need to grieve of parents, siblings, grandparents, aunts, uncles, spouses, children, and friends is ignored, their journey to a restored sense of self is retarded. As a caring person in their lives, you may be the only one available to listen non-judgmentally. Making yourself available physically through your presence and emotionally through your receptivity is a wonderful gift to give.
 
Your urge may be to strongly encourage them to talk, but if you do that they may feel pushed. What is more helpful is to back off and wait until you get a signal that they are ready to talk; then your readiness to listen and your availability are maximally effective.
 
Respect the “Under re-construction” sign
 
Have you ever gone to a website only to see with disappointment that you cannot have the experience of the site that you hoped: it is “under re-construction”? The individual nature of the grief response means that each person approaches the task of healing differently and in their own time, according to the experiences and influences that have shaped their life. The person may be taking longer than you thought they should to heal; their behaviour may seem inappropriate at times. But remember, the death has been a shattering experience for the person; their life is now “under re-construction”.
 
Your urge may be to criticise how they are going about the re-construction, or to guide them to do it differently. What is more helpful is to merely accept their pace, their way. The “website” of their life will come back “online” when they are ready, once re-construction has gained serious traction.
 
Be aware of holidays and anniversaries
 
Events such as birthdays, anniversaries, and holidays used to be special, and for the suicide-bereaved, they still are: special and potent reminders that the loved one is no longer with them. It is hard. Their pain and hurt is a natural part of the grieving, but it may fall to you as support person to be there when the bereaved person is most in touch with grief over the loved one’s absence.
 
Your urge could be to try to take the hurt away, make it immediately “better” for the survivor. What is more helpful is to allow the expression of grief, and not shrink from remembering the person, as that can be a comforting confirmation that the person who was so much a part of the bereaved person’s life is not forgotten.
 
Suggest a support group
 
Connecting with other people who have had the same traumatic experience is one of the best ways to accelerate healing. Generally, survivors in a support group are allowed, even encouraged, to tell their stories as often as they like while the group listens patiently.
 
Your urge may be to help your supported person find such a group. If so, indulge in it! What may also be helpful is to offer any assistance necessary to help the bereaved arrive at the meeting. This could include offers of a ride to the meeting, looking after children while the person attends the meeting, or something else.
 
Respect faith and spirituality
 
If the bereaved person has access to a spiritual holding of some sort – a religion, stillness practice, or some sort of faith-based path they follow – it may help them to face the death. Because their philosophy may be different from yours, it may be more difficult for you to support them when you hear them make statements emanating from a spiritual tradition that seems invalid to you.
 
One way this can manifest is in a person getting angry with God. Your religious or spiritual path may find that objectionable, but remember: getting angry with God means having a relationship with God. The person might also need to explore how religion complicated their life: for example, by being brought up to believe that those who suicide will “go to hell”.
 
Your urge might be to explore the finer points of theology, “helping” them to understand more. Stifle it. What is more helpful is to listen and learn, allowing the expression of feelings about religion and spirituality. It’s all part of the process of working out what has meaning.
 
Understand that without love there is no grief
 
The grief arises because the bereaved person loved, because they were in relationship with the deceased. The need for loving support still goes on, so wherever possible, the bereaved family can heal better if they can join forces with others, such as other family members and friends who are also grieving, and grieve together in healthy ways: not alone, not in silence.
 
Your urge might be to underestimate just how much energy, time, and caring it takes to support a person bereaved by suicide: probably more than you ever dreamed possible. What is helpful is to understand that, ultimately, your effort will be more than worth it, in terms of your relationship
 
Helping survivors cope
 
While the above understandings and attitudes towards the suicide-bereaved will help ensure that your support is sensitive and compassionate, bereaved people looking to you for support may also want to know about basic coping actions that they can take right now, immediately, even in early stages of the healing process. Here is a list of suggestions which may be useful.
  1. Encourage them to set aside time each day for grieving. During this time, they are free to cry, think of the deceased, meditate, or pray.
  2. Suggest the keeping of a journal. Writing may give them some control over the most intense emotions. Writing down obsessive thoughts may cause those thoughts to lose some of their power.
  3. Encourage the expression of feelings through creative outlets such as painting, poetry, cooking, gardening, or woodwork. These can be immensely restorative.
  4. Back the person going for support from activities such as massage, meditation, listening to music, or practicing relaxation techniques. These can help reduce both the physical and emotional stress of bereavement.
  5. Remind them that exercise can help them to feel better emotionally and also render them physically tired, so that they can sleep.
  6. Urge good self-care: eating enough (and well), resting sufficiently, and setting aside time for enjoyable activities are all important. Engaging them is not disloyal to the dead person.
  7. Suggest that they not make any major decisions for a while, like moving house or getting rid of the deceased person’s possessions.
  8. Warn them that they may very well hit a “low spot” sometime after the funeral, and that if they do, asking for help is the best thing that they can do.
  9. Discourage them from believing that alcohol or drug usage will provide more than a very temporary escape, after which they will probably feel worse. Substance usage can cause depression and poor health. If they feel the need for drugs, you can encourage them to get in touch with their G.P., or perhaps an organisation such as Alcoholics Anonymous.
  10. Tell them how important it is, if they are feeling depressed with sleep, appetite, and energy issues, to seek help from their doctor. (Hawton & Simkin, 2010)
This article is an extract of the Mental Health Social Support Specialty “Supporting the Suicidal and Suicide-Bereaved”. For more information on MHSS, visit www.mhss.net.au.
 
References:
 
Hawton, K., & Simkin, S. (2010). Help is at hand: A resource for people bereaved by suicide and other sudden, traumatic death. National Health Service (UK): copyright: Crown. Retrieved on 28 March, 2012, from weblink
 
Join our community:
 
 
Intobookstore
 
The Institute has a list of recommended textbooks and DVDs which can add great value to your learning journey - and the good news is that you can purchase them very easily. The AIPC bookstore will give YOU:
  • Discounted prices!
  • Easy ordering method!
  • Quality guarantee!
This fortnight's feature is...
 
Name: Basic Personal Counselling, 6th edition
Authors: Geldard D. & Geldard K.
AIPC Code: GELDARD
AIPC Price: $47.65 (RRP $52.95)
ISBN: 978-144-250-2192
 
A training manual for counsellors which is a comprehensive, easy-to-read introduction to personal counselling, written for professional and volunteer counsellors and those who train them.
 
To order this book, simply contact your nearest Student Support Centreor the AIPC Head Office (1800 657 667).
 
Intoarticles
 
The Micro-skills of Non-verbal Language
 
The American National Science Foundation discovered that we form an impression of someone in just three seconds (personal communication, 1984). Social scientists also claim that at least 80 per cent of our communication takes place on the non-verbal level (Young, 2005), with only 7 percent of emotion being conveyed by verbal means. Of the rest, 38 per cent is conveyed by voice, and 55 per cent by facial expression (Mehrabian, 1972). Beyond that, researchers have come to appreciate non-verbal behaviours as important channels of communication, serving the functions of...
 
Click here to continue reading this article.
 
 
Behaviour and Solution Focused Couple Therapy
 
The practice of couple therapy has been encouraged to incorporate a more scientific model of practice and the use of research to inform the style of therapy most appropriate to use (Whiting & Crane, 2003). As a result, the discipline of couple and family counselling is moving to an evidence based focus.
 
A number of theoretical frameworks have attempted to conceptualise dyadic relationships. Some of these theories have become foundations for the interventions that have become common in couple’s therapy today. Some of the models and theories include the strategic model, emotion focused therapy, solution focused therapy, behaviour theory and attachment theory.
 
Click here to continue reading this article.
 
Other articles: www.aipc.net.au/articles
 
Intodevelopment
 
71 Courses for less than $1/ Day
 
Hundreds of counsellors, psychologists, social workers, mental health nurses and allied health professionals already access over 100 hours of professional development, for less than $1 a day. Now it’s your turn.
 
All programs have been specially developed by psychologist and counsellor educators and are conveniently accessible online, 24/7. They’re filled with content that’ll help you understand your own life, and how to improve on your current condition.
 
Program areas include:
  • Conflict & Mediation
  • Relationships
  • Grief & Loss
  • Children & Adolescents
  • Communication Skills
  • Addictions
  • Bullying
  • Incident & Trauma
  • And much more.
Begin your journey today. Click on the link below to register for a monthly or annual unlimited membership. As an unlimited member, you can access all MHA courses for less than $1 per day, and receive substantial discounts when purchasing any video workshop:
 
 
 
PCA ACT-NSW Meetings
 
The Professional Counselling Association of the ACT and NSW (PACT ACT-NSW) welcomes AIPC students to attend bi-monthly meetings, including clinical supervision and OPD (ongoing professional development) counselling presentations.
 
To register, visit http://www.pcaonline.com.au/PCA-Branches.html; choose which branch meeting you wish to attend; and contact the relevant Convener for further information.
 
Intoconnection
 
Have you visited theCounselling Connection Blog yet? There are over 600 interesting posts including case studies, profiles, success stories, videos and much more. Make sure you too get connected (and thank you for those who have already submitted comments and suggestions).
 
Lifestyle Interventions for Depression
 
Treatments for depression or anxiety, also called “interventions”, fall into one of three categories, and often several are recommended to be taken up at once. These main groupings are: Medical interventions; Psychological interventions; and Lifestyle interventions. In this post we overview a range of lifestyle interventions therapists can suggest when treating depression.
 
Click here to continue reading this post.
 
Get new posts delivered by email! Visit our FeedBurner subscription page and click the link on the subscription box.
 
 
Intotwitter
 
Follow us on Twitter and get the latest and greatest in counselling news. To follow, visit http://twitter.com/counsellingnews and click "Follow".
 
Featured Tweets
 
NEWS: The Mental Health Social Support (MHSS) course is now fully accredited by the Australian Physiotherapy Association for 14 CPD hours!
 
 
 
 
 
A Blueprint For 'Affective' Aggression: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/249855.php
 
 
Note that you need a Twitter profile to follow a list. If you do not have one yet, visit http://twitter.com to create a free profile today!
 
Tweet Count: 3630
Follower Count: 4960
 
Intoquotes
 
"Really great people make you feel that you, too, can become great."
 
~ Mark Twain
 
Intoseminars
 
Many students of the Diploma of Counselling attend seminars to complete the practical requirements of their course. Seminars provide an ideal opportunity to network with other students and liaise with qualified counselling professionals in conjunction with completing compulsory coursework.
 
Not sure if you need to attend Seminars? Click here for information on Practical Assessments.
 
Below are the remainder seminars dates and locations for 2012. You can also access this information and seminar pre-requisites via our website: www.aipc.net.au/timetables.php.
 
To register for a seminar, please contact your Student Support Centre.
 
BRISBANE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 20/10, 01/12
Communication Skills II - 03/11
The Counselling Process - 22/09, 24/11
Counselling Therapies I - 08-09/12
Counselling Therapies II - 27-28/10
Case Management - 10-11/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 13/10
Counselling Applications - 16/12
 
CDA Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 20/10, 01/12
Communication Skills II - 03/11
The Counselling Process - 22/09, 24/11
Counselling Therapies I - 06-07/10, 8-9/12
Counselling Therapies II - 27-28/10
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 17/11
Family Therapy - 15/12
Case Management - 10-11/11
 
GOLD COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 17/11
Communication Skills II - 15/09, 15/12
The Counselling Process - 27/10, 01/12
Counselling Therapies I - 21-22/09
Counselling Therapies II - 23-24/11
Case Management - 19-20/10
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 27/10, 01/12
Communication Skills I - 17/11
Communication Skills II - 15/10, 15/12
Counselling Therapies I - 21-22/09
Counselling Therapies II - 23-24/11
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 26/10
Case Management - 19-20/10
 
MELBOURNE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 06/10, 03/11, 01/12
Communication Skills II - 07/10, 04/11, 02/12
The Counselling Process - 29/09, 27/10, 23/11, 14/12
Counselling Therapies I - 13-14/10, 10-11/11, 8-9/12
Counselling Therapies II - 15-16/09, 20-21/10, 17-18/11, 15-16/12
Case Management - 22-23/09, 27-28/10, 24-25/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 30/09
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 29/09, 27/10, 23/11, 14/12
Communication Skills I - 06/10, 03/11, 01/12
Communication Skills II - 07/10, 04/11, 02/12
Counselling Therapies I - 13-14/10, 10-11/11, 8-9/12
Counselling Therapies II - 15-16/09, 20-21/10, 17-18/11, 15-16/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 30/09
Case Management - 22-23/09, 27-28/10, 24-25/11
 
NORTHERN TERRITORY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 01/12
Communication Skills II - 22/09, 08/12
The Counselling Process - 10/11
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/11
Counselling Therapies II - 15-16/12
Case Management - 24-25/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 06/10
Counselling Applications - 27/10
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 10/11
Communication Skills I - 01/12
Communication Skills II - 22/09, 08/12
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/11
Counselling Therapies II - 15-16/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 03/11
Family Therapy - 15/09
Case Management - 24-25/11
 
SOUTH AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 10/11
Communication Skills II - 11/11
The Counselling Process - 14/10, 09/12
Counselling Therapies I - 24-25/11
Case Management - 06-07/10
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 15/09
Counselling Applications - 13/10
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 14/10, 09/12
Communication Skills I - 10/11
Communication Skills II - 11/11
Counselling Therapies I - 24-25/11
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 08/12
Family Therapy - 16/09
Case Management - 06-07/10
 
SUNSHINE COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 10/11
Communication Skills II - 11/11
The Counselling Process - 29/09
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/10
Case Management - 06-07/10
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 13/10
Counselling Applications - 03/11
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 29/09
Communication Skills I - 10/11
Communication Skills II - 11/11
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/10
Family Therapy - 22/09
Case Management - 06-07/10
 
SYDNEY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 06/10, 15/11
Communication Skills II - 20/10, 30/11
The Counselling Process - 22/09, 15/10, 03/11, 26/11, 13/12
Counselling Therapies I - 27-28/09, 23-24/11
Counselling Therapies II - 13-14/10, 14-15/12
Case Management - 26-27/10, 06-07/12
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 04/10, 17/12
Counselling Applications - 05/10, 18/12
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 22/09, 15/10, 03/11, 26/11, 13/12
Communication Skills I - 06/10, 15/11
Communication Skills II - 20/10, 30/11
Counselling Therapies I - 27-28/09, 23-24/11
Counselling Therapies II - 13-14/10, 14-15/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 19/11
Family Therapy - 20/11
Case Management - 26-27/10, 06-07/12
 
TASMANIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 23/09, 16/12
Communication Skills II - 04/11
The Counselling Process - 25/11
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/11
Counselling Therapies II - 01-02/12
Case Management - 10-11/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 21/10
Counselling Applications - 28/10
 
CDA Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 23/09, 16/12
Communication Skills II - 04/11
The Counselling Process - 25/11
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/11
Counselling Therapies II - 01-02/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 09/12
Family Therapy - 14/10
Case Management - 10-11/11
 
WESTERN AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 15/09, 27/10, 08/12
Communication Skills II - 16/09, 28/10, 09/12
The Counselling Process - 06/10, 03/11, 01/12
Counselling Therapies I - 24-25/11
Counselling Therapies II - 22-23/09, 15-16/12
Case Management - 10-11/11
Counselling Applications - 04/11
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 06/10, 03/11, 01/12
Communication Skills I - 15/09, 27/10, 08/12
Communication Skills II - 16/09, 28/10, 09/12
Counselling Therapies I - 24-25/11
Counselling Therapies II - 22-23/09, 15-16/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 29/09
Family Therapy - 07/10
Case Management - 10-11/11
 
Important Note: Advertising of the dates above does not guarantee availability of places in the seminar. Please check availability with the respective Student Support Centre.
 
 
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