In this Issue

Hello!
Intothediploma
Intomhss
Intocommunity
Intocounselling
Intobookstore
Intostory
Intoarticles
Intodevelopment
Intoconnection
Intotwitter
Intoquotes
Intoseminars

Contact us

Publications

Editor: Sandra Poletto
Email: ezine@aipc.net.au
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Copyright: 2012 Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors

Hello!
Welcome to Edition 164 of Institute Inbrief. Addiction is a plague that affects individuals and society in an adverse manner. It is a very costly illness that has worldwide prevalence. In this edition’s featured article we explore 5 different stages of addiction.
 
Also in this edition:
  • MHSS Workshops
  • Lert – Our Social Responsibility Program
  • Previously Published Articles
  • Professional Development news
  • Blog and Twitter updates
  • Upcoming seminar dates
If you would like to access daily articles & resources, and interact with over 5000 peers, make sure you join our Facebook community today: www.facebook.com/counsellors. It is a great way to stay in touch and share your interest and knowledge in counselling.
 
Enjoy your reading,
 
 
Editor
 
 
Join our community:
 
 
Help those around you suffering mental illness in silence: www.mhss.net.au
 
Intothediploma
 
AIPC is Determined to Make Counselling an Attainable Career for You,
Just Like Over 55,000 Other Students in the Past 20 Years!
 
We have helped over 55,000 people from 27 countries pursue their dream of assisting others with a recognised Counselling qualification.
 
It's been a wonderful journey over the last 20 years (the Institute was first established in 1990). And it's been a pleasure to assist so many people realise their counselling aspirations in that time.
 
Why are so many people delighted with their studies? Our research over the years highlights three keys points...
 
Our courses and personnel have just ONE specific focus... Excellence in Counselling Education. We live and breathe counselling education! Nothing else gets in the way.
 
Exceptional value in your education investment. Our courses are always (always) much less than other providers that deliver counselling education. Our unique focus on counselling education, the large number of students undertaking our programs, and the creative way we deliver our courses provide us with cost savings that we pass on to you.
 
The flexibility to study where, when and how you want to. You can study Externally, In-Class, On-Line or any combination. And you can undertake your studies at a pace that suits you... 12 to 18 months or over 2, 3 even 4 years or more. You decide because you are in charge.
 
We understand that no two people have the same circumstances. You no doubt have issues affecting your life that are unique to you and affect the speed and manner you'd like to study. You may be working full or part-time, undertaking other studies, or may not have studied for a long time.
 
Let's face it, life is not predictable and in today's fast paced society it's important that your education is flexible enough to fit in with your other obligations. AIPC provides you with flexible course delivery modes so YOU set the rules for how and when you learn.
 
Want to find out more? Visit www.aipc.net.au/lz today!
 
Watch inspirational stories from some of our Graduates: www.aipc.net.au/gradvideo
 
Hear what Employers say about our Graduates: www.aipc.net.au/employervids
 
Intomhss
 
Mental Health Social Support Workshops
 
The mental health of Australians is deteriorating. And that’s putting your family, friends and colleagues at increasing risk of depression, anxiety, alcohol and drug use, and suicide.
 
The statistics are frightening:
  • 45% of adult Australians will experience a mental illness.
  • Mental illness is the leading cause of 'healthy life' lost.
  • 3 million Australians will experience a major depressive illness.
  • 26% of 16-24 year olds have experienced a mental disorder in the last 12-months.
  • Mental disorders are the leading contributor to the total burden of disease among young Australians - accounting for 49% of that total.
  • 12% of 13-17 year olds have reported having thought about suicide.
There's a very good chance that right now someone close to you is secretly and silently suffering. Unattended that suffering could lead to a serious psychological problem including depression or even suicide. If you’re not appropriately equipped, mental illness could hit someone you love with devastating consequences.
 
This is why we believe the ability to identify early onset mental illness, appropriately intervene and provide support is the most crucial life skill you can have. These are Mental Health Social Support (MHSS) skills.
 
You can acquire these critical life skills in our upcoming 2-Day MHSS Workshops. Places are strictly limited due to the interactive nature of the program. You can reserve your spot here now:
 
Melbourne, VIC: 11-12/08/12 – REGISTER HERE
Canning Vale, WA: 11-12/08/12 – REGISTER HERE
Parramatta, NSW: 30-31/08/12 – REGISTER HERE
Glandore, SA: 01-02/09/12 – REGISTER HERE
 
 
It’s very important you book now to avoid missing out.
 
If you prefer to undertake your training entirely online, visit www.mhss.net.au/lz to learn more and register for the MHSS eCourse.
 
Click here for information on CPD endorsement for counsellors, nurses and other professionals.
 
Intocommunity
 
Lert – Our Social Responsibility Program
 
 
Lert (www.lert.com.au) is a national member organisation of ordinary individuals with an extraordinary vision of dramatically reducing the onset of mental illness through early intervention, education and community engagement.
 
Lerts are ordinary folk – not necessarily mental health professionals – that share a willingness to help their communities and workplaces address the systemic problem of mental illness.
 
The heart and soul of Lert is empowering local individuals and communities to raise awareness about mental illness. There’s no prescribed “best way” to achieve this, other than through awareness and recognising the varied activities and approaches that can reduce mental illness across different environments and settings.
 
You can learn about our exciting project here: www.lert.com.au/lz
 
Website: www.lert.com.au
 
Join Lert Facebook here: www.facebook.com/RUaLert
Join Lert Twitter here: www.twitter.com/RUaLert
 
Intocounselling
 
The Five Stages of Addiction
 
Addiction is a plague that affects individuals and society in an adverse manner. It is a very costly illness that has worldwide prevalence (http://www.aipc.net.au/articles/?p=209).
 
If addiction is an illness wherein a person’s drives are operating improperly, then the stages of addiction are the signposts that indicate just how far down the road to addiction the drives have taken the person. Many authorities in the field of addiction recognise four or five major stages. We’ll review each of these stages below.
 
Stage One: Experimentation
 
Also called “partying” or “chipping” in the context of drug and alcohol addictions, this first stage is where use of the substance or performance of the behaviour is voluntary, and there are no apparent negative consequences. The first time a person looks through a pornographic magazine, or a teenager goes to a party and has some drinks and some pills in order to fit in, that is experimentation. Similarly, the first time a person goes to a casino and spends a few hours at the tables or the pokies, they are just toying with gambling, trying it out.
 
The impetus to explore the substance or behaviour may have arisen in order to deal with an unmet need. An example of this could be an older woman who loses her husband and purchases a bottle of wine to drink with dinner because she no longer has her life companion to share dinner with. The substance or behaviour often seems to help assuage the feeling of loss, emptiness, or lack of esteem which created the original interest in the experimentation. Because it seems to help, the person is drawn to using the substance or performing the behaviour again, ushering in the second stage.
 
Stage Two: Regular use (with alcohol and drugs, this is also called the “misuse” stage)
 
Here people are not truly addicted, and some may remain at this stage for months or even years, possibly never becoming an addict. Generally this is the time when the negative consequences of doing the substance/behaviour begin to make themselves known. For instance, a person regularly using alcohol may get stopped on the way home for driving while intoxicated, and have his licence suspended for six months. A food addict has established her favourite binge foods and looks forward to the Friday night binge. She will “need” the binge all the more after being told that her cholesterol and blood pressure are dangerously high.
 
Because many people at this stage stop using the substance (or doing the behaviour) while the negative consequences are happening, they feel entitled to claim that they are in control and not addicted. An example here could be the man who has been visiting pornographic or online dating sites. His wife finds out about them and is shocked and hurt. He promises not to ever visit the sites again: a promise he keeps until the fuss dies down, whereupon he finds himself drawn back to the sites again.
 
This is usually the time when regular use begins to evolve into risky use: the porno-site-visitor, for instance, decides that he needs to personally meet one of the beautiful “babes” he is seeing on the sites.
 
Stage Three: Risky use (also called “abuse”)
 
The point at which an individual crosses the line from “regular” use to “risky” use or “abuse” can be difficult to determine and varies in each case. What is common here is that the social, legal, financial, and/or health consequences of engaging with the substance/behaviour are escalating, and the person continues with the behaviour despite the toll it is taking in his or her life. An example is the gambler who begins to gamble away the money in the family cheque account because other funds have been exhausted. Even though his wife notices and confronts him about the missing funds, he still returns to the casino. A drug addict at this point needs to borrow or steal in order to fund the habit. Some people pass quickly from this stage to dependence.
 
Stage Four: Dependence
 
This stage is sometimes combined with Stage Five, Addiction, but it is useful to separate the two, because many people at Stage Four appear to be quite functional, although the underlying reality is that work, personal, and social obligations are not being met. The dependent person may still be employed, and appear to have friendships and primary relationships, at least at the earlier part of this stage, as they may mostly confine the times for doing the substance/behaviour to leisure hours. Looking more closely, however, one finds that the person is struggling to keep it all together. The friendships may be with other heavy drinkers, for example, and revolve around drinking activities.
 
Underneath a veneer of family harmony there may be increasing tension in the home relationships as the addict’s focus and interest narrow to the substance or behaviour only (for example, the alcoholic is only interested in the bottle). As the person becomes drawn more and more into the world of the addiction, he or she begins to disappear for periods with no explanation. Family members and loved ones are reluctant to confront the person, because increased moodiness on the part of the addict means that other members of the household must “walk on eggshells” in order to keep the peace, and possibly avoid violence. By modifying their own actions in this way, family members are enabling even more of the addictive behaviour.
 
Clearly, the façade of functionality can only be kept up for so long. The reality is that the person is probably already addicted, and the manipulation, justification, and defensiveness will only increase as the addict attempts to keep up this new way of life.
 
Stage Five: Addiction
 
The last stage of persistent abuse of substances or compulsive repetition of harmful behaviours is addiction. As we defined above, addiction means that the person no longer has a choice, and is engaging with the substance/behaviour under compulsion generated by changed brain circuitry dictating that certain substances or behaviours are “rewarding”, and must be undertaken at all costs. Out of control and often not even enjoying a “high” as much as needing to avoid withdrawal, the addict engenders repeated negative consequences in the form of mental, emotional, or physical harm from his or her actions. Those consequences include the loss of health, job and financial security, and relationship, and – often – the gaining of a criminal record.
 
Addiction is a progressive, chronic, and sometimes fatal disease. As the Intercept Interventions site states, “If left untreated, it can only lead to jails, institutions, death, and dereliction, in no specific order” (Intercept Interventions, 2012; Martin et al, 2007; Drug Rehab Advice Center, n.d.).
 
This article is an extract of the upcoming Mental Health Social Support Specialty “Aiding Addicts”. For more information on MHSS, visit www.mhss.net.au.
 
References:
 
Drug and Alcohol Rehab Asia (DARA). (2011). Alcoholism in Australia. Drug and Alcohol Rehab Asia. Retrieved on 1 May, 2012, from: http://alcoholrehab.com/alcohol-rehab/alcoholism-in-australia Drug Rehab Advice Center. (Undated). Stages of Addiction. Drug Rehab Advice Center: Drug Addiction Rehab United States and Canada. Retrieved on 3 May, 2012 from: http://www.drugrehabadvice.org/stagesofaddiction.html
 
Intercept Interventions (2012) Stages of Addiction. Intercept Interventions. Retrieved on 3 May, 2012 from http://www.interceptinterventions.com/stages-of-addiction
 
Martin, P.R., Weinberg, B.A., & Bealer, B.K. (2007). Healing addiction: An integrated pharmacopsychosocial approach to treatment. Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
 
Join our community:
 
 
Intobookstore
 
The Institute has a list of recommended textbooks and DVDs which can add great value to your learning journey - and the good news is that you can purchase them very easily. The AIPC bookstore will give YOU:
  • Discounted prices!
  • Easy ordering method!
  • Quality guarantee!
This fortnight's feature is...
 
Name: Intentional Interviewing & Counselling, 7th edition
Authors: Ivey & Ivey
AIPC Code: IVEY
AIPC Price: $83.65 (RRP $92.95)
ISBN: 978-049-559-9746
 
This book is a modern and comprehensive resource that teaches aspiring and beginning helpers how to conduct effective interviews. The authors’ user-friendly microskills approach has shown students and professionals throughout the world how to develop competence in helping skills.
 
To order this book, simply contact your nearest Student Support Centre or the AIPC Head Office (1800 657 667).
 
Intostory
 
When Ordinary Isn’t Ordinary
 
An inspirational story from a student who faced her disability and achieved her goal of becoming a professional counsellor.
 
By Sandra C Brown
 
One could be excused for thinking that Nerissa was just an ordinary grandmother, playing boisterous games with her grandchildren. In fact, Nerissa is far from ordinary. She is legally blind and has been since birth.
 
She said she was born prematurely and the birth was normal but when Nerissa was two months old, an unsuspecting nurse asked her mother ‘when Nerissa would begin to see’. After that various tests were carried out and Nerissa was deemed blind.
 
Still her mother hoped that Nerissa would get better and when Nerissa stretched out her hand for her pink ball, her mum got excited as she thought Nerissa was beginning to see. The specialist stated that Nerissa was intelligent-guessing.
 
Dr Kate Campbell, in Melbourne, was researching the relationship between premature births and blindness in babies and found there was indeed a relationship. It was found that lack of oxygen at this time could cause permanent blindness. This is what happened to Nerissa. She had been so afraid that her condition might be hereditary – but it wasn’t.
 
Nerissa said her mother, a maths teacher, was determined that when Nerissa reached the age of two, she would not send her to the Blind Institute to board as was the custom for blind children, rather she would teach her herself and let the Blind School monitor Nerissa’s progress. Her mother taught at a private school, and she enrolled Nerissa as an ‘ordinary’ student. She felt that smaller classes would help Nerissa to blend in and would not be treated differently.
 
Professor Laderer from Sydney University invented the Laderer lens which enabled Nerissa to have some quality sight and the ability to keep up with her school work. It enabled Nerissa to read a couple of words at a time, instead of part of a word which made more sense to her own learning and wasn’t so ‘bitty’.
 
As a result, Nerissa said: ‘I never felt I was disabled in any way. I can read, write, type and I passed all my school examinations but forty years ago, employment was difficult to find if one had a disability. 
 
This didn’t stop Nerissa attending the local dance hall, where she met her husband, Ian. When asked if he knew Nerissa was blind, he said: ‘No. She was standing at the edge of the dance floor with her friends. I just asked her to dance and she accepted.’ Nerissa giggled at the thought of that first meeting.
 
Nerissa loves children and hoped to become a kindergarten teacher but her headmistress wouldn’t recommend her as she thought that Nerissa would never know the whereabouts of the children!
 
Because Nerissa’s condition wasn’t heredity, she had the three children she longed for – Tiffany, Clint and Cory. ‘Caring for them wasn’t so difficult,’ Nerissa said. ‘I used my other senses. I could tell when my children needed a nappy changed.’ She could make out colours and knew which part of the anatomy to wipe. Her hearing was and is highly perceptive. She knew where her children were at all times.
 
Tiffany, the eldest child, tried to raid the cookie jar, only to be told to put the biscuit jar back. She couldn’t understand how her mother knew she was there and what she was doing. Having a disability in one sense means the other senses become much more perceptive.
 
Not all the time though! Nerissa recalls that once she was on a ‘blind’ date and her escort had no knowledge she was legally blind. Nerissa can see colours, and this, she says, helps others not to see her disability but on this occasion as she reached out for a sandwich, (white bread) she instead landed her hand right in the middle of a squelchy cream cake. She was embarrassed, and had to tell her date that it was a ‘double blind date’. What does a date do with one hand dripping with fresh cream?
 
When the children grew up and the youngest, Cory, left home Nerissa felt the nest was empty and something was missing. She had been told on numerous occasions that she was good at listening. She said she enjoyed people’s company and hearing what they had to say.
 
She finally decided to go with her ‘gut’ instinct and take a counselling course. She enrolled with the Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors because, she said, there was no pressure to finish within a certain time.
 
Whilst the Institute didn’t treat her any differently from other students, they did ring on a regular basis to see if everything was going okay. She valued this as she didn’t feel totally alone but she was perfectly capable of doing the work.
 
Nerissa enjoyed the study and the interaction with other students. She had good reports from her practical assessor to say she was organised, meticulous and empathic with good questioning techniques.
 
Nerissa felt she had achieved something precious. Because of her blindness, she has had to understand herself more and this has helped enormously. She said she did not learn anything new about herself during the course, but what it did do was to re-affirm what she already knew and more importantly that what she was doing was where she wanted to be.
 
I asked if I could wave that magic wand, what would she wish to change in her life. Nerissa named the following: to drive and not be so dependent on Ian.
 
Surprised, I asked, ‘where is the one: to see again?’
 
Nerissa replied that she didn’t think of herself as being blind. She has lived an ordinary life, has a loving family, an interest in people, what more could she want? Her family has always been supportive and they have done well in their chosen careers. Nerissa and Ian are extremely proud of them.
 
Nerissa stated she was determined to succeed in what she did. She’s organised her phone to have different ring tones assigned to different members of her family and friends so she knows just who is calling her. She has a special computer program called Zoomtext Extra, which enables the screen to enlarge letters so that 2-3 words at a time can be seen. This means that instead of reading text word for word, the reader can read for sense.
 
I asked if she had any pearls of wisdom to offer students who are either struggling or have a disability.
 
‘Oh, yes,’ she said. ‘Try to do what you want. If you can’t do it one way, try a different way and don’t give up.’
 
Nerissa is a role model for those who think about giving up whether it is an academic course or a hobby or even a job. She is now looking for her next challenging role. Nerissa is grateful to the AIPC for giving her the impetus to carry on, and helping her when she needed help.
 
She was looking forward to receiving her Diploma at the end of 2010 and was encouraged to attend the ceremony and meet her peers. It was an enlightening time for all and I know her husband and family were really proud of their extraordinary wife and mother.
 
She is having a sabbatical at present and is travelling around Australia. She says she wants to catch up with friends before her eyesight finally fails. All I can say is: Well Done, Nerissa.
 
Intoarticles
 
The Problem of School Bullying
 
Bullying behaviour among school students is not unique to any one culture and unfortunately, has been in existence for a long time. As society progressed into the technological age of the 21st century, bullying behaviour shifted from consisting solely of ‘sticks and stones’.
 
The level of sophistication for bullying behaviour has grown to incorporate the world of cyber bullying. Research on bullying behaviour has been conducted worldwide since the late 1970’s and 1980’s, with some of the most well respected research conducted by Australian psychologist, Dr Ken Rigby and Dr Dan Olweus, a Scandinavian psychologist.
 
Click here to continue reading this article.
 
 
Happiness and Positive Psychology
 
Positive Psychology’s primary focus is on what people do right to obtain and maintain optimum happiness (Compton, 2005), by striving to understand and help people develop qualities that lead to greater personal fulfilment. The premise of positive psychology is to promote factors that allow individuals to thrive and flourish by encouraging a change of focus in psychology from a preoccupation with repairing the worst things to a greater emphasis on discovering and building upon positive qualities.
 
Click here to continue reading this article.
 
Other articles: www.aipc.net.au/articles
 
Intodevelopment
 
Convenient Professional Development
 
Hundreds of counsellors, psychologists, social workers and allied health professionals already access over 100 CPD hours online, for less than $1 a day. Now it's your turn.
 
Mental Health Academy (MHA) is the leading provider of continuing professional development education for the mental health industry. MHA provides the largest variety of courses and videos workshops, all conveniently delivered via the internet.
 
With MHA, you no longer have to worry about high costs, proximity and availability, or fitting a workshop around your lifestyle!
 
You can access the huge range of CPD, including courses and video workshops, whenever and from wherever you want.
 
Whether you are looking for courses on anxiety and depression, or a video workshop discussing the intricacies of relationship counselling - Mental Health Academy is your gateway to over 100 hours of professional development content.
 
Take a quick look at what Mental Health Academy offers:
  • Over 70 professionally developed courses.
  • On-demand, webstreamed video workshops.
  • Over 100 hours of professional development.
  • Extremely relevant topics.
  • New courses released every month.
  • Video supported training.
  • Online, 24/7 access to resources.
  • Endorsement by multiple Associations, including AASW, ACA and APS.
Begin your journey today: www.mentalhealthacademy.com.au
 
Intoconnection
 
Have you visited theCounselling Connection Blog yet? There are over 600 interesting posts including case studies, profiles, success stories, videos and much more. Make sure you too get connected (and thank you for those who have already submitted comments and suggestions).
 
Lert FAQs
 
The heart and soul of Lert is empowering local individuals and communities to raise awareness about mental illness. There’s no prescribed ‘best way’ to achieve this, other than through awareness and recognising the varied activities and approaches that can reduce mental illness across different environments and settings.
 
What’s the purpose of Lert?
 
Mental illness is costing families, workplaces and our society dearly. And the problem is getting worse at a concerning rate. By 2020 the World Health Organisation estimates that depression will be the second leading disability causing disease in the world; labelling the dramatic increase a ‘global depression pandemic’...
 
Click here to continue reading this post.
 
Get new posts delivered by email! Visit our FeedBurner subscription page and click the link on the subscription box.
 
 
Intotwitter
 
Follow us on Twitter and get the latest and greatest in counselling news. To follow, visit http://twitter.com/counsellingnews and click "Follow".
 
Featured Tweets
 
 
If your friend tells you they are feeling suicidal... http://au.reachout.com/find/articles/if-your-friend-threatens-to-take-their-own-life
 
myCompass is an interactive self-help service that aims to promote resilience and wellbeing for all Australians: https://www.mycompass.org.au/
 
AIPC Article Library » The Important Role of Mental Health Social Support: http://www.aipc.net.au/articles/?p=299
 
The new August issue of The Psychologist magazine is online & includes open access articles on the psychology of time: http://www.thepsychologist.org.uk/archive/archive_home.cfm?volumeID=25&editionID=216
 
Why did AIPC invest in Lert? Find out more: http://bit.ly/aipcandlert
 
Yoga reduces stress; now it's known why: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120724144538.htm
 
Note that you need a Twitter profile to follow a list. If you do not have one yet, visit http://twitter.com to create a free profile today!
 
Tweet Count: 3555
Follower Count: 4810
 
Intoquotes
 
"Act as if what you do makes a difference. It does."
 
~ William James
 
Intoseminars
 
Many students of the Diploma of Counselling attend seminars to complete the practical requirements of their course. Seminars provide an ideal opportunity to network with other students and liaise with qualified counselling professionals in conjunction with completing compulsory coursework.
 
Not sure if you need to attend Seminars?Click here for information on Practical Assessments.
 
Below are the remainder seminars dates and locations for 2012. You can also access this information and seminar pre-requisites via our website: www.aipc.net.au/timetables.php.
 
To register for a seminar, please contact your Student Support Centre.
 
BRISBANE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 04/08, 20/10, 01/12
Communication Skills II - 09/09, 03/11
The Counselling Process - 22/09, 24/11
Counselling Therapies I - 8-9/12
Counselling Therapies II - 27-28/10
Case Management - 10-11/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 13/10
Counselling Applications - 11/08, 16/12
 
CDA Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 04/08, 20/10, 01/12
Communication Skills II - 09/09, 03/11
The Counselling Process - 22/09, 24/11
Counselling Therapies I - 06-07/10, 8-9/12
Counselling Therapies II - 27-28/10
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 25/08, 17/11
Family Therapy - 08/09, 15/12
Case Management - 10-11/11
 
GOLD COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 18/08, 17/11
Communication Skills II - 15/09, 15/12
The Counselling Process - 27/10, 01/12
Counselling Therapies I - 21-22/09
Counselling Therapies II - 23-24/11
Case Management - 19-20/10
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 03/08
Counselling Applications - 17/08
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 27/10, 01/12
Communication Skills I - 18/08, 17/11
Communication Skills II - 15/10, 15/12
Counselling Therapies I - 21-22/09
Counselling Therapies II - 23-24/11
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 26/10
Family Therapy - 17/08
Case Management - 19-20/10
 
MELBOURNE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 05/08, 01/09, 06/10, 03/11, 01/12
Communication Skills II - 11/08, 02/09, 07/10, 04/11, 02/12
The Counselling Process - 04/08, 29/09, 27/10, 23/11, 14/12
Counselling Therapies I - 18-19/08, 8-9/09, 13-14/10, 10-11/11, 8-9/12
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/08, 15-16/09, 20-21/10, 17-18/11, 15-16/12
Case Management - 22-23/09, 27-28/10, 24-25/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 30/09
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 04/08, 29/09, 27/10, 23/11, 14/12
Communication Skills I - 05/08, 01/09, 06/10, 03/11, 01/12
Communication Skills II - 11/08, 02/09, 07/10, 04/11, 02/12
Counselling Therapies I - 18-19/08, 8-9/09, 13-14/10, 10-11/11, 8-9/12
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/08, 15-16/09, 20-21/10, 17-18/11, 15-16/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 30/09
Family Therapy - 12/08
Case Management - 22-23/09, 27-28/10, 24-25/11
 
NORTHERN TERRITORY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 18/08, 01/12
Communication Skills II - 22/09, 08/12
The Counselling Process - 10/11
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/11
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/08, 15-16/12
Case Management - 24-25/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 06/10
Counselling Applications - 27/10
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 10/11
Communication Skills I - 18/08, 01/12
Communication Skills II - 22/09, 08/12
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/11
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/08, 15-16/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 03/11
Family Therapy - 15/09
Case Management - 24-25/11
 
SOUTH AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 01/09, 10/11
Communication Skills II - 02/09, 11/11
The Counselling Process - 05/08, 14/10, 09/12
Counselling Therapies I - 24-25/11
Counselling Therapies II - 08-09/09
Case Management - 06-07/10
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 15/09
Counselling Applications - 13/10
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 05/08, 14/10, 09/12
Communication Skills I - 01/09, 10/11
Communication Skills II - 02/09, 11/11
Counselling Therapies I - 24-25/11
Counselling Therapies II - 08-09/09
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 04/08, 08/12
Family Therapy - 16/09
Case Management - 06-07/10
 
SUNSHINE COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 04/08, 10/11
Communication Skills II - 05/08, 11/11
The Counselling Process - 29/09
Counselling Therapies I - 18-19/08
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/10
Case Management - 06-07/10
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 13/10
Counselling Applications - 03/11
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 29/09
Communication Skills I - 04/08, 10/11
Communication Skills II - 05/08, 11/11
Counselling Therapies I - 18-19/08
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/10
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 08/09
Family Therapy - 22/09
Case Management - 06-07/10
 
SYDNEY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 28/08, 06/10, 15/11
Communication Skills II - 31/08, 20/10, 30/11
The Counselling Process - 27/08, 22/09, 15/10, 03/11, 26/11, 13/12
Counselling Therapies I - 27-28/09, 23-24/11
Counselling Therapies II - 17-18/08, 13-14/10, 14-15/12
Case Management - 24-25/08, 26-27/10, 06-07/12
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 04/10, 17/12
Counselling Applications - 05/10, 18/12
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 27/08, 22/09, 15/10, 03/11, 26/11, 13/12
Communication Skills I - 28/08, 06/10, 15/11
Communication Skills II - 31/08, 20/10, 30/11
Counselling Therapies I - 27-28/09, 23-24/11
Counselling Therapies II - 17-18/08, 13-14/10, 14-15/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 01/09, 19/11
Family Therapy - 08/09, 20/11
Case Management - 24-25/08, 26-27/10, 06-07/12
 
TASMANIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 23/09, 16/12
Communication Skills II - 05/08, 04/11
The Counselling Process - 19/08, 25/11
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/11
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/08, 01-02/12
Case Management - 11-12/08, 10-11/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 21/10
Counselling Applications - 28/10
 
CDA Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 23/09, 16/12
Communication Skills II - 05/08, 04/11
The Counselling Process - 19/08, 25/11
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/11
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/08, 01-02/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 02/09, 09/12
Family Therapy - 14/10
Case Management - 11-12/08, 10-11/11
 
WESTERN AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 04/08, 15/09, 27/10, 08/12
Communication Skills II - 05/08, 16/09, 28/10, 09/12
The Counselling Process - 08/09, 06/10, 03/11, 01/12
Counselling Therapies I - 01-02/09, 24-25/11
Counselling Therapies II - 22-23/09, 15-16/12
Case Management - 25-26/08, 10-11/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 09/09
Counselling Applications - 11/08, 04/11
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 08/09, 06/10, 03/11, 01/12
Communication Skills I - 04/08, 15/09, 27/10, 08/12
Communication Skills II - 05/08, 16/09, 28/10, 09/12
Counselling Therapies I - 01-02/09, 24-25/11
Counselling Therapies II - 22-23/09, 15-16/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 29/09
Family Therapy - 11/08, 07/10
Case Management - 25-26/08, 10-11/11
 
Important Note: Advertising of the dates above does not guarantee availability of places in the seminar. Please check availability with the respective Student Support Centre.
 
 
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