AIPC Institute InBrief
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In this Issue

in here
bullet Hello!
bullet Intothediploma
bullet Intoeducation
bullet IntoMHSS
bullet Intocounselling
bullet Intobookstore
bullet Intoarticles
bullet Intodevelopment
bullet Intoconnection
bullet Intotwitter
bullet Intoquotes
bullet Intoseminars
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Editor: Sandra Poletto
Email: ezine@aipc.net.au
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Copyright: 2012 Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors

Hello!
Welcome to Edition 158 of Institute Inbrief. Appropriate use of non-verbal micro-skills tells care recipients that you are with them and ready to listen. When you use opening micro-skills, you are inviting them to tell you more.
 
This edition’s featured article explores a range of opening micro-skills that be used to emotionally and psychologically support a client, friend or loved one.
 
Also in this edition:
  • News and Events
  • Training opportunities
  • Previously Published Articles
  • Professional Development news
  • Blog and Twitter updates
  • Upcoming seminar dates
If you would like to access daily articles & resources, and interact with over 4650 peers, make sure you join our Facebook community today: www.facebook.com/counsellors. It is a great way to stay in touch and share your interest and knowledge in counselling.
 
Enjoy your reading,
 
 
Editor
 
 
Join our community:
 
 
Help those around you suffering mental illness in silence: www.mhss.net.au/lz 
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Intothediploma
 
AIPC is Determined to Make Counselling an Attainable Career for You,
Just Like Over 55,000 Other Students in the Past 20 Years!
 
We have helped over 55,000 people from 27 countries pursue their dream of assisting others with a recognised Counselling qualification.
 
It's been a wonderful journey over the last 20 years (the Institute was first established in 1990). And it's been a pleasure to assist so many people realise their counselling aspirations in that time.
 
Why are so many people delighted with their studies? Our research over the years highlights three keys points...
 
Our courses and personnel have just ONE specific focus... Excellence in Counselling Education. We live and breathe counselling education! Nothing else gets in the way.
 
Exceptional value in your education investment. Our courses are always (always) much less than other providers that deliver counselling education. Our unique focus on counselling education, the large number of students undertaking our programs, and the creative way we deliver our courses provide us with cost savings that we pass on to you.
 
The flexibility to study where, when and how you want to. You can study Externally, In-Class, On-Line or any combination. And you can undertake your studies at a pace that suits you... 12 to 18 months or over 2, 3 even 4 years or more. You decide because you are in charge.
 
We understand that no two people have the same circumstances. You no doubt have issues affecting your life that are unique to you and affect the speed and manner you'd like to study. You may be working full or part-time, undertaking other studies, or may not have studied for a long time.
 
Let's face it, life is not predictable and in today's fast paced society it's important that your education is flexible enough to fit in with your other obligations. AIPC provides you with flexible course delivery modes so YOU set the rules for how and when you learn.
 
Want to find out more? Visit www.aipc.net.au/lz today!
 
Watch inspirational stories from some of our Graduates: www.aipc.net.au/gradvideo
 
Hear what Employers have to say about AIPC Graduates: www.aipc.net.au/employervids
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Intoeducation
 
Learn How You Can Gain Specialty Expertise and a Graduate Qualification with a Vocational Graduate Certificate or Vocational Graduate Diploma in Counselling...
 
...In Only 6 to 12 Months
 
More and more Counsellors are gaining advanced specialist skills with a Vocational Graduate qualification. Vocational Graduate qualifications provide a higher level, vocational alternative to traditional Post Graduate courses offered by Universities.
 
It's time and cost effective, meaning you can gain a formal graduate qualification in 6 to 12 months in your specialist area. Here's how a graduate qualification can advance your career:
  • Develop a deeper understanding of your area of interest and achieve more optimal outcomes with your clients.
  • A graduate qualification will assist you move up the corporate ladder from practitioner to manager/ supervisor.
  • Make the shift from being a generalist practitioner to a specialist.
  • Gain greater professional recognition from your peers.
  • Increase client referrals from allied health professionals.
  • Maximise job opportunities in your preferred specialty area.
  • Formalise years of specialist experience with a respected qualification.
Save Over $6,000 (67% Discount to Market)
 
A Vocational Graduate Diploma at a university costs between $10,000 and $38,000. BUT, you don’t have to pay these exorbitant amounts for an equally high quality qualification. You can do your qualification with the Institute and save a massive $6,000+ on the cost of doing a similar course at university.
 
To learn more, please visit www.aipc.net.au/vgd. Alternatively, call your nearest Institute branch on the FreeCall numbers shown below.
 
Sydney: 1800 677 697
Melbourne: 1800 622 489
Perth: 1800 246 381
Brisbane: 1800 353 643
Adelaide: 1800 246 324
Regional NSW: 1800 625 329
Regional QLD: 1800 359 565
Gold Coast: 1800 625 359
NT/Tasmania: 1800 353 643
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IntoMHSS
 
Mental Health Social Support Workshops
 
The mental health of Australians is deteriorating. And that’s putting your family, friends and colleagues at increasing risk of depression, anxiety, alcohol and drug use, and suicide.
 
The suicide rate is now around double the road toll. And the World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that by 2020, depression will be the second leading disability causing disease in the world; labelling the dramatic increase a “global depression pandemic”.
 
If you’re not appropriately equipped, mental illness could hit someone you love with devastating consequences.
 
This is why we believe the ability to identify early onset mental illness, appropriately intervene and provide support is the most crucial life skill you can have. These are Mental Health Social Support (MHSS) skills.
 
You can acquire these critical life skills in our upcoming 2-Day MHSS Workshops. Places are strictly limited due to the interactive nature of the program. You can reserve your spot here now:
It’s very important you book now to avoid missing out.
 
If you prefer to undertake your training entirely online, visit www.mhss.net.au/lz to learn more and register for the MHSS eCourse.
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Intocounselling
 
The Opening Micro-skills
 
“First impressions stick.”
“You never get a second chance to make a first impression.”
 
If there is any truth in these two popular notions, then anyone working with a helpee (e.g. a therapy client, a friend, a family member, etc.) within the context of providing mental health support should not underestimate the usefulness and importance of opening micro-skills.
 
Appropriate use of non-verbal micro-skills tells care recipients that you are with them and ready to listen. When you use opening micro-skills, you are inviting them to tell you more. While these are technically commands, they are “soft” ones, in that they are presented to the helpee in a manner that communicates, “It is okay to decline”. They help to create comfort in the helpee because they foster the courage to confide. The purpose of openers is to encourage disclosure without dominating the conversation. There are two broad categories of these skills: “encouragers”, such as “door openers” and “minimal encouragers”, and questions. First we consider the encouragers.
 
Encourager micro-skill: door openers. Initiated by the helper, door openers are short, non-judgmental statements or questions which encourage exploration and discussion by communicating the availability of the helper. Helpees determine how deep they go with them. They are particularly common in the initial phase of a helping encounter, and may include observations by the helper.
 
Here are some examples:
  • “What would you like to discuss today?”
  • “What’s happening for you?”
  • “Can you tell me more about that?”
  • “You look discouraged today. Do you want to talk about it?”
  • “What’s on your mind?”
  • “I see you have some brochures for different medical centres. Would you like to talk about that?”
Door openers are useful because they aid helpers in beginning a conversation or getting helpees to expand on a topic. Also, they buy time for the helper to formulate a response.
 
Encourager micro-skill: minimal encouragers. From head nods to positive facial expressions to “uh-huhs”, these brief supportive statements signal attention and understanding. Minimal encouragers are (mostly) verbal responses that show interest and involvement, but have the purpose of encouraging the helpee to keep talking.
 
They are not intended to start a conversation, nor to stimulate discussion. They only communicate that the listener is on track. They allow the helpee to determine the primary direction of the conversation. With this micro-skill, the helpee is rewarded for continuing to talk.
 
Examples of minimal encouragers are:
  • “Yes”
  • “I’m with you.”
  • “Okay.”
  • “I see what you mean.”
  • “Umm.”
  • Silence, accompanied by positive facial expression, nods, or open gestures (Young, 2005).
Minimal encouragers are successful helper tools because of the paradox that they create. In using them, helpers most powerfully aid helpees by simply getting themselves out of the way.
 
Encourager micro-skill: questions. While non-verbal language and encouragers are foundational to the helper’s micro-skills, it is questions that provide a systematic framework for directing the helping session. They can aid a helping interview to begin, and move it along smoothly. Questions can open up new areas for discussion, and issues can be pinpointed and clarified.
 
All of this helps care recipients explore themselves and their issues. All schools of psychology recognise questions as an essential component, and they are particularly prominent in some theories, such as re-careering, brief counselling, and cognitive-behavioural approaches. The major function of questions is to help the helpee to talk more freely and openly, to check perceptions, or to provide specific information. Your skill in questioning as a helper can have these results:
  • Bringing out more of the helpee’s story, enriching their world, and aiding in keeping the story going;
  • Making an effective assessment of a helpee’s issue. Questions are the backbone of effective assessment. The who, what, when, where, how, and why of journalism is recommended as a ready system for helping the helpee to elaborate;
  • Guiding the manner in which a care recipient talks about an issue. “What” questions bring out facts, and “How” questions tend to promote discussion about processes, sequences, or feelings. Concrete specifics can be brought out with such questions as, “Could you give me a specific example?” 
  • Assisting the helpee to search for positive assets, because stories presented in the helping session are often negative, and full of problems. The positive asset search is a concrete way to approach positive regard and respect for the client; 
     
  • Helping to open or close talk according to the individual need of the interview. For instance, helpers would not want to have a helpee begin to open up right at the end of the helping session (Ivey & Ivey, 2003).
The shadow side of questions. Questions are powerful, useful, and necessary. But they must be utilised sparingly, with great caution. The wrong sort of question can close helpees down rather than open them up. When responding to your questions, helpees talk within your frame of reference, not their own. Questions can potentially take self-direction away from the helpee (Ivey & Ivey, 2003).
 
And too many or poorly phrased questions can cause the helpee to feel interrogated rather than supported and comforted, increase their dependence on the helper, and encourage socially acceptable answers rather than honest ones. The following problems in using questions crop up frequently with beginning or unskilled helpers:
 
Bombardment/grilling. Too many questions tend to put helpees on the defensive.
 
Multiple questions. Helpers sometimes ask a helpee several questions at once. Although the helpee may be glad to have a choice as to which question to answer, it often feels like bombardment.
 
Questions as statements. Helpers sometimes make a statement in the form of a question which pushes their agenda or point of view. It is probably better to just be direct about the fact that a statement is being made, rather than try to disguise it as a question.
 
Questions and cultural differences. Members of some cultures receive questions, even rapidly asked questions, with ease, but in other cultures, receiving a number of questions promotes distrust of the helper. Also, as there is often a power differential between helper and helpee, questions can imbalance the power even more, as they give control to the question-asker (the helper).
 
‘Why’ questions. These may be necessary occasionally, but generally cause great discomfort in helpees, because many people remember being scolded or punished as a child after they were asked why questions.
 
Questions and control. While questions can be useful in bringing an out-of-control session under direction, questions can also be used unfairly and intrusively for the helper’s gain rather than that of the helpee. If this happens, the relationship built by use of attending skills is destroyed.
 
We will be concerned here with the two main types: closed and open questions.
 
Closed questions. These are questions that lead to a specific, often very short, answer. It may be an answer like “yes” or “no”. They have the advantage of focusing the interview and obtaining information, but the burden of guiding the talk (and therefore the “power” or position of dominance in the session) remains with the question-asker (usually the helper). With these, the helpee may choose to expand on the answer, but is not likely to do so. Closed questions often begin with is, are, or do: for example, “Do you love your girlfriend?” “Is that why you came to see me?” “Are you employed?”
 
In responding to a closed question (especially if it is a leading question), helpees often feel restricted in the type of information that they are “allowed” to add back in. They may perceive that the helper has an agenda that they should somehow respect. Thus, they may not feel comfortable to talk freely. For example, how would you respond to a (closed) question such as, “Do you think that you did that because your father never paid much attention to you?” It is worth noting that lawyers use closed questions to constrain and focus the direction of people on the witness stand. Helpers don’t generally have the same goals as barristers (Geldard & Geldard, 2005).
 
Open questions. In contrast, open questions cannot be answered in a few words. They encourage a person to talk, and provide maximum information. They persuade helpees to answer by giving them the opportunity to refuse. The helpee responding to an open question is given lots of scope, and “allowed” to freely divulge additional material, which enriches the response. Open questions often begin with what, how, why, or could. Generally more useful to helpers, these can facilitate deeper exploration of issues.
 
Examples of open questions are: “What is your relationship with your parents like?” “How did you come to this decision?” “Could you tell me more about your involvement with that?” Open questions, by their nature, encourage helpees to talk about things that are interesting and meaningful to them rather than those that are so to the counsellor (Geldard & Geldard, 2005; Ivey & Ivey, 2003).
 
References:
 
Ivey, A. E., & Ivey, M.B. (2003). Intentional interviewing and counseling: Facilitating client development in a multicultural society (5th ed.). California: Thomson Brooks/Cole.
 
Geldard and Geldard (2005). Basic personal counseling: A training manual for counselors. Australia: Pearson.
 
Young, M.E. (2005). Learning the art of helping: Building blocks and techniques. New Jersey: Pearson/Merrill Prentice Hall.
 
Did you enjoy this article? Then share the feeling and forward it to a friend! Quick reminder: Please send this eZine to all your family and friends so they too can enjoy the benefits. Thank you.
 
Join our community:
 
 
Help those around you suffering mental illness in silence: www.mhss.net.au/lz
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Intobookstore
The Institute has a list of recommended textbooks and DVDs which can add great value to your learning journey - and the good news is that you can purchase them very easily. The AIPC bookstore will give YOU:
  • Discounted prices!
  • Easy ordering method!
  • Quality guarantee!
This fortnight's feature is...
 
Name: Culturally Relevant Ethical Decision-Making in Counselling
Authors: Houser, Rick & Wilczenski, Felicia L. & Domokos-Cheng Ham, Maryanna
AIPC Code: HOU
AIPC Price: $77.36 (RRP $85.95)
ISBN: 1-4129-0587-7
 
With this text, you will gain the knowledge and skills for effective group counselling and leadership and learn key theoretical approaches to group leadership and how to successfully apply each in practice.
 
To order this book, simply contact your nearest Student Support Centre or the AIPC Head Office (1800 657 667).
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Intoarticles
 
A Case of Childhood Sexual Abuse
 
Marna attended counselling to try to do “something” with her memories of child abuse that currently seem to be affecting her life. She attended twelve appointments over a six-month period.
 
In this scenario, the professional counsellor uses an eclectic approach incorporating Humanistic, Psychodynamic, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and Abuse Literature Approaches. For ease of writing, the Professional Counsellor is abbreviated to “C”.
 
Click here to continue reading this article...
 
 
A Person Centred Approach to Grief and Loss
 
Author: Kaye Laemmle
 
Elizabeth came to counselling because she was experiencing intense anger, and was not coping with her life. She complained of failed relationships with her ex-husband, and with another man whom she left her husband to be with.
 
Elizabeth cannot move on from the anger she feels about her failed relationships and she is feeling isolated from her family and friends. This had an effect on her ability to cope with her work. As a consequence, Elizabeth has sold her successful business.
 
The Professional Counsellor saw Elizabeth for 5 months and used an eclectic approach with her, including techniques from Cognitive-Behaviour therapy and Solution Focussed therapy.
 
For ease of writing the Professional Counsellor is abbreviated to “C”.
 
Click here to continue reading this article...
 
Other articles: www.aipc.net.au/articles
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Intodevelopment
 
Convenient Professional Development
 
Hundreds of counsellors, psychologists, social workers, mental health nurses and allied health professionals already access over 100 Hours of Professional Development online, for less than $1 a day. Now it's your turn.
 
Mental Health Academy (MHA) is the leading provider of professional development education for the mental health industry. MHA provides the largest variety of courses and videos workshops, all conveniently delivered via the internet.
 
With MHA, you no longer have to worry about high costs, proximity and availability, or fitting a workshop around your lifestyle!
 
You can access the huge range of PD, including courses and video workshops, whenever and from wherever you want.
 
Whether you are looking for courses on anxiety and depression, or a video workshop discussing the intricacies of relationship counselling - Mental Health Academy is your gateway to over 100 hours of professional development content.
 
Take a quick look at what Mental Health Academy offers:
  • Over 70 professionally developed courses.
  • On-demand, webstreamed video workshops.
  • Over 100 hours of professional development.
  • Extremely relevant topics.
  • New courses released every month.
  • Video supported training.
  • Online, 24/7 access to resources.
  • Endorsement by multiple Associations, including AASW, ACA and APS.
Begin your journey today. Click on the link below to register for a monthly or annual unlimited membership. As an unlimited member, you can access all MHA courses for less than $1 per day, and receive discounts when purchasing any video workshops:
 
 
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Intoconnection
Have you visited the new Counselling Connection Blog yet? There are over 500 interesting posts including case studies, profiles, success stories, videos and much more. Make sure you too get connected (and thank you for those who have already submitted comments and suggestions).
 
Upcoming PD Events for Counsellors
 
Below is a comprehensive list of upcoming professional development events for counsellors. All the events listed below are recognised for ongoing professional development (OPD) by the Australian Counselling Association (2 points per 1 hour duration for most activities – see www.theaca.net.au for further information on OPD endorsement).
 
Click here to read the full post...
 
Get new Counselling Connection posts delivered by email! Simply visit our FeedBurner subscription page and click the link on the subscription box: https://feeds.feedburner.com/CounsellingConnection.
 
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Intotwitter
Follow us on Twitter and get the latest and greatest in counselling news. To follow, visit https://twitter.com/counsellingnews and click "Follow".
 
Featured Tweets
 
Research: Common Mental Disorders Such as #Depression May Not Elicit Much Support https://psychcentral.com/news/2012/04/10/common-mental-disorders-may-not-elicit-much-support/37131.html
 
Learn more about AIPC's Recognition of Prior Learning and Mutual Recognition program: https://www.aipc.net.au/rpl.php
 
Gender and personality impacts how we process negative memories: https://ct.counseling.org/2012/04/gender-and-personality-impacts-how-we-process-negative-memories/
 
New genes linked to brain size, intelligence: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/04/120415150123.htm
 
Memory in adults impacted by versions of four genes: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/04/120415151347.htm
 
 
Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Emergencies (WHO): https://www.who.int/mental_health/emergencies/en/
 
Note that you need a Twitter profile to follow a list. If you do not have one yet, visit https://twitter.com to create a free profile today!
 
Tweet Count: 3310
Follower Count: 4440
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Intoquotes
"Try a thing you haven’t done three times. Once, to get over the fear of doing it. Twice, to learn how to do it. And a third time, to figure out whether you like it or not."
 
~ Virgil Garnett Thomson
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Intoseminars
Many students of the Diploma of Counselling attend seminars to complete the practical requirements of their course. Seminars provide an ideal opportunity to network with other students and liaise with qualified counselling professionals in conjunction with completing compulsory coursework.
 
Below are the seminars dates for the first semester of 2012. To register for a seminar, please contact your Student Support Centre.
 
To access the full list of 2012 seminars, visit: www.aipc.net.au/timetables.php.
 
BRISBANE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 26/05
Communication Skills II - 21/04, 23/06
The Counselling Process - 28/04
Counselling Therapies I - 16-17/06
Counselling Therapies II - 14-15/04
Case Management - 14-15/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 09/06
 
CDA Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 26/05
Communication Skills II - 21/04, 23/06
The Counselling Process - 28/04
Counselling Therapies I - 16-17/06
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 12/05
Family Therapy - 02/06
Case Management - 14-15/06
 
GOLD COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 19/05
Communication Skills II - 16/06
The Counselling Process - 21/04
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/05
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 21/04
Communication Skills I - 19/05
Communication Skills II - 16/06
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 20/4
Family Therapy - 15/06
 
MELBOURNE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 06/05, 03/06
Communication Skills II - 12/05, 09/06
The Counselling Process - 05/05, 02/06
Counselling Therapies I - 21-22/04, 19-20/05, 16-17/06
Counselling Therapies II - 28-29/04, 26-27/05, 23-24/06
Case Management - 31/03-01/04, 30/06-01/07
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 13/05
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 05/05, 02/06
Communication Skills I - 07/05, 05/02, 03/03, 14/04, 06/05, 03/06
Communication Skills II - 12/05, 09/06
Counselling Therapies I - 21-22/04, 19-20/05, 16-17/06
Counselling Therapies II - 28-29/04, 26-27/05, 23-24/06
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 13/05
Family Therapy - 10/06
Case Management - 30/06-01/07
 
NORTHERN TERRITORY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Counselling Therapies II - 28/04, 05/05
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 09/06
Counselling Applications - 12/05
 
CDA Timetable
 
Communication Skills II - 23/07
Counselling Therapies II - 28/04, 05/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 16/06
Family Therapy - 21/04, 15/09
 
SOUTH AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 19/05
Communication Skills II - 20/05
The Counselling Process - 02/06
Counselling Therapies I - 28-29/04
Counselling Therapies II - 23-24/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 05/05
Counselling Applications - 16/06
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 02/06
Communication Skills I - 19/05
Communication Skills II - 20/05
Counselling Therapies I - 28-29/04
Counselling Therapies II - 23-24/06
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 06/05
Family Therapy - 17/06
 
SUNSHINE COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 19/05
Communication Skills II - 20/05
The Counselling Process - 30/06
Counselling Therapies II - 26-27/05
Case Management - 23-24/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 28/04
Counselling Applications - 14/07
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 30/06
Communication Skills I - 19/05
Communication Skills II - 20/05
Counselling Therapies II - 26-27/05
Family Therapy - 02/06
Case Management - 23-24/06
 
SYDNEY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 28/04, 05/06
Communication Skills II - 05/05, 18/06
The Counselling Process - 21/04, 12/05, 04/06, 21/06
Counselling Therapies I - 23-24/04, 15-16/06
Counselling Therapies II - 17-18/05, 29-30/06
Case Management - 22-23/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 07/05
Counselling Applications - 08/05
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 21/04, 12/05, 04/06, 21/06
Communication Skills I - 28/04, 05/06
Communication Skills II - 05/05, 18/06
Counselling Therapies I - 23-24/04, 15-16/06
Counselling Therapies II - 17-18/05, 29-30/06
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 26/05
Family Therapy - 01/06
Case Management - 22-23/06
 
TASMANIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 24/06
Communication Skills II - 06/05
The Counselling Process - 20/05
Counselling Therapies II - 29-30/04
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 17/06
 
CDA Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 24/06
Communication Skills II - 06/05
The Counselling Process - 20/05
Counselling Therapies II - 29-30/04
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 27/05
 
WESTERN AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 28/04, 26/05, 07/06
Communication Skills II - 29/04, 27/05
The Counselling Process - 12/05
Counselling Therapies I - 21-22/04, 09-10/06
Counselling Therapies II - 05-06/05
Case Management - 19-20/05
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 16/06
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 12/05
Communication Skills I - 28/04, 26/05, 07/06
Communication Skills II - 29/04, 27/05
Counselling Therapies I - 21-22/04, 09-10/06
Counselling Therapies II - 05-06/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 02/06
Case Management - 19-20/05
 
Important Note: Advertising of the dates above does not guarantee availability of places in the seminar. Please check availability with the respective Student Support Centre.
 
 
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Help those around you suffering mental illness in silence: www.mhss.net.au/lz 
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