AIPC Institute InBrief
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bullet Intothediploma
bullet Intonews
bullet Intocounselling
bullet Intobookstore
bullet Intoarticles
bullet Intodevelopment
bullet Intoconnection
bullet Intotwitter
bullet Intoquotes
bullet Intoseminars
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Editor: Sandra Poletto
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Copyright: 2012 Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors

Hello!
Welcome to Edition 152 of Institute Inbrief. In edition 151 we provided you with an introduction to mental health social support (MHSS). In this edition, we’ll discuss the vital role MHSS plays in supporting those in need within our communities. We’ll also explore the potential downside of providing mental health social support, as well as mental and emotional symptoms of distress.
 
Also in this edition:
 
-      Closing – Bachelor of Psychological Science & Counselling
-      Previously Published Articles
-      Professional Development news
-      Blog and Twitter updates
-      Upcoming seminar dates
 
If you would like to access daily articles & resources, and interact with over 4300 peers, make sure you join our Facebook community today: www.facebook.com/counsellors. It is a great way to stay in touch and share your interest and knowledge in counselling.
 
We wish you and your loved ones a happy festive season and great start of 2012. We will take a short break but will be back very early next year with more counselling news, updates and articles. Until then, stay safe and enjoy your reading!
 
 
Editor
 
 
Join our community:
 
 
 
Help those around you suffering mental illness in silence: https://www.mhss.net.au/lz
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Intothediploma
 
AIPC is Determined to Make Counselling an Attainable Career for You,
Just Like Over 55,000 Other Students in the Past 20 Years!
 
We have helped over 55,000 people from 27 countries pursue their dream of assisting others with a recognised Counselling qualification.
 
It's been a wonderful journey over the last 20 years (the Institute was first established in 1990). And it's been a pleasure to assist so many people realise their counselling aspirations in that time.
 
Why are so many people delighted with their studies? Our research over the years highlights three keys points...
 
1.     Our courses and personnel have just ONE specific focus... Excellence in Counselling Education. We live and breathe counselling education! Nothing else gets in the way.
 
2.     Exceptional value in your education investment. Our courses are always (always) much less than other providers that deliver counselling education. Our unique focus on counselling education, the large number of students undertaking our programs, and the creative way we deliver our courses provide us with cost savings that we pass on to you.
 
3.     The flexibility to study where, when and how you want to. You can study Externally, In-Class, On-Line or any combination. And you can undertake your studies at a pace that suits you... 12 to 18 months or over 2, 3 even 4 years or more. You decide because you are in charge.
 
We understand that no two people have the same circumstances. You no doubt have issues affecting your life that are unique to you and affect the speed and manner you'd like to study. You may be working full or part-time, undertaking other studies, or may not have studied for a long time.
 
Let's face it, life is not predictable and in today's fast paced society it's important that your education is flexible enough to fit in with your other obligations. AIPC provides you with flexible course delivery modes so YOU set the rules for how and when you learn.
 
Want to find out more? Visit www.aipc.net.au/lz today!
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Intonews
 
Closing – Bachelor of Psychological Science & Counselling
 
Just a few weeks ago we opened up enrolments into the Bachelor of Psychological Science and already the majority of places have been filled. But there are still some places remaining.
 
If you want a secure future doing something you love, then Psychology could be ideal for you.
 
Psychology is one of the most in-demand occupations. It has grown by 77% over the last 5 years, outgrowing all other occupations by almost 600%.
 
Psychology is also one of the most flexible qualifications, offering you rewarding careers in a diverse range of fields such as private practice, HR, human services, public health, market research, organisational development, education, defence services and more.
 
Our unique learning model means you can earn-while-you-learn, so you don’t have to give up work to fit in your studies.
 
-      Study externally from anywhere in Australia, even overseas.
-      Fund your tuition with Fee-Help.
-      SAVE up to $40,000 on your qualification.
-      Can start with just 1 subject.
-      Online learning portal with access to all study materials, readings and video lectures.
-      Attend residential schools to integrate your learning.
-      Accredited by the Australian Psychology Accreditation Council (APAC).
-      No minimum HSC or OP results required to gain entry.
-      Learn in a friendly, small group environment.
 
You can submit your obligation free expression of interest (or enrol) in the Bachelor of Psychological Science here: www.aip.edu.au/lz
 
Enrolments and expressions of interest into our Bachelor of Counselling are also open. You can learn more here: www.aipc.edu.au/degree
 
We expect to hit capacity enrolments for Semester 1 2012 very soon. So if you’re thinking about a career in psychology or counselling, please submit your interest now to avoid missing out.
 
More information on the programs:
 
Bachelor of Psychological Science: www.aip.edu.au/lz
 
Bachelor of Counselling: www.aipc.edu.au/degree
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Intocounselling
 
The Important Role of Mental Health Social Support
 
The mental health social supporter’s roles and responsibilities that you have identified in our previous article may be only a part of the full role. When providing social support it is also critically important to understand how your support may effectively be delivered in a community which includes professional counselling, medical services, and other care and support systems.
 
The mental health social supporter as a resource to the professional
 
How can professional and “natural” support systems collaborate with one another? One study noted that people get lots of help for personal mental-health-linked problems but not all of it from mental health professionals. Rather, people may turn to those “helping agents” with whom they have contact in everyday lives (such as the community caregiver and friends, for example).
 
Because informal helping networks work so well to reduce and even prevent problems, it is useful to consider opportunities for the exchange of resources between them -- mental health social supporters -- and professionals. It is clear that social supporters can work effectively as “complements” to formal treatment services (Gottlieb and Schroter, 1978). What follows are some specific ways that the mental health social supporter can assist the professional.
 
Inform and advise health systems about services: Mental health social supporters are usually local people who can inform and advise health agencies about the effective delivery of human services. For example, let’s say you are supporting someone who is caring for her mother and you know that once a month the mother is scheduled to see a psychiatrist who works some distance away. Once you realise that this requires multiple changes of public transport (meaning all-day travel), you may be able to help the daughter access closer psychiatric support for the mother.
 
Strengthen professional practice: Mental health social supporters may be able to help strengthen professional practice. By making their helping acts visible and transparent, mental health social supporters can help professionals recognise and utilise the existing resources in the helpee’s social network (Clifford, 1976; Gottlieb, 1978).
 
Support compliance with prescribed treatment regimens: Mental health social supporters either are a care recipient’s principal helper (e.g. a daughter caring for her mother), or possibly they are a support person for that principal helper. At either “level” of aid, the mental health social supporter can ensure that any prescribed treatments are being followed and provide support to assist in the implementation of prescribed treatment regimens. Mental health social supporters can help to lower the stress for carers in the situation of being the primary caregiver.
 
Design and implementation of health care and social service delivery systems: Mental health social supporters may have acquired knowledge of gaps in health care delivery (Gottlieb and Schroter, 1978). As such they may be able to influence the urban planning process by having input into submissions dealing with the provision of health care and social services.
 
The Professional as a resource to the natural support system
 
What can professionals do to assist mental health social supporters?
 
Referrals to professionals: Because helpees already trust the mental health social supporter, he/she can, when appropriate, play a key role in the helpee seeing or accepting the need for more professional assistance. Such assistance may be in the areas of individual, couples or family counselling; financial counselling and budgeting; or social work services. The more that the mental health social supporter knows about which professional services are available, the better he/she is able to promote the helpee’s access to appropriate help.
 
Referral will often be the most constructive form of support that a mental health social supporter can deliver to a helpee experiencing or causing emotional or behavioural distress (in fact, a failure to refer when referral is indicated by the helpee’s mood, thoughts or behaviour would be a significant breach of the social supporter’s duty of care). Delaying referral likewise can interfere with the helpee’s right to timely assistance, and can result in less positive treatment outcomes (Luborsky, Auerbach, Chandler, and Cohen, 1971).
 
Professionals can update mental health social supporters about resources available: Since improving the accuracy and timeliness of referrals that mental health social supporterscould make is in the interest of professionals as well as their clients, it may be a win-win situation for supporters to periodically ask professionals in their area for updates about resources available, from modes of practice to fee schedules. The professionals will thank them, but the person turning to them for help can be grateful, too. The knowledge and information at the outset may help the care recipient to have a more realistic set of expectations about what professional help can accomplish. That may help to keep them in programs when the going gets tough.
 
Professionals can establish or broaden the helpee’s treatment plan: Professionals know that having personal support often helps a person to remain with a treatment plan, or even extend it. Personal support in this instance may entail being an empathetic listener for a victim of abuse or providing transport to therapy sessions, such as group-work relating to alcohol, abusive relationships, or compulsive gambling. The mental health social supporter’s local knowledge of resources can help turn the professional practitioner’s treatment plan for the helpee into actual access to appropriate services, such as access to a woman’s refuge shelter, or to employment skills training programs.
 
Professionals can help mental health social supporters reduce environmental stress: Professional practitioners such as social workers may be able to assist a mental health social supporter to recognise and address environmental stressors present in a helpee’s living environment. Aiders may be aware of social issues that their helpee is grappling with.
 
Mental Health Social Support: is there a downside?
 
Is there a downside to providing Mental Health Social Support? Do either the givers or the receivers of support experience ill effects? How might social support services do harm?
 
Conflicted support relationships: “Supportive relationships” are not always beneficial, as they may be a source of conflict as well. An elderly spouse supporting a partner with dementia or brain injury, or parents caring for an adult who is mentally retarded are likely to experience episodes of real frustration and distress that affects their own and their dependent’s quality of life. The active involvement of social service agencies in the caregivers’ daily lives, issues of privacy and confidentiality, and the adequacy of financial support all impact on the emotional and physical resources of those at the “sharp end” of care.
 
Dysfunctional behaviours may develop, such as “patients” placing excessive demands on caregivers’ time (over-dependence). Caregivers may begin to neglect or to bully those whom they have previously treated with the utmost of respect (Chu et al, 2010). The mental health social supporter must have regard not just for the wellbeing of the “patient” but for the well-being and quality of life of the primary caregiver as well.
 
Dismissive, unsupportive help: Some research has shown how, when attempting to share about the witnessing or experience of violence, victims have received dismissive or unsupportive comments from a supposed “helper”.
 
This situation has created what is called “social constraint” in the victim. That is, the response of the discloser (the victim) to poor quality support was to feel that they should keep their trauma-related thoughts to themselves. But doing that makes it hard for victims to move on from the trauma. For example, they may avoid thinking about or discussing the trauma. This may reduce opportunities for them to make sense of stressful experiences. Thus, while appropriate social support helps to reduce symptoms of depression after exposure to violence, ineffective “support” may increase the effects of trauma (Kaynak, et al 2011).
 
Competition instead of collaboration: Social support systems can misfire when roles and responsibilities are not clear between mental health social supporters and the professionals with whom they must deal. It would be unhelpful for a mental health social supporter to try to imitate a professional style of helping with their helpee. Too, there is the danger of professional and informal helping systems trying to limit one another’s influence, or competing for the same resources. Mental Health Social Support works best when it is complementary to professional support systems, and works in direct collaboration with them (Gottlieb and Schroter, 1978).
 
In summary, mental health social supporters are an effective way of addressing the problem of insufficient professional resources in the community. Many mental health social supporters work beyond the 9-to-5 limits set by professional practitioners, and they may continue to see and support their helpees after the helpees’ initial presenting problems have been addressed (Becker, et al, 2004). It is a matter of trust, sense of duty, and even friendship that the mental health social supporter may bring to the situation.
 
Recognising symptoms of distress
 
How do you know when someone could use your help? This section includes two types of indicators which may be helpful to mental health social supporters in making a decision to approach a person with offers of support regarding their concerns. The first indicators are the observable aspects of a person (mostly, the non-verbal and physical aspects). The second class of indicators includes those of mood, anxiety, and ability to control impulses. Together these provide a reasonable indication of how severe a helpee’s needs may be. It is important to bear in mind, however, that some people are highly skilled at masking their emotions, acting as though they are coping, when actually they are not.
 
It is vital when evaluating needs based on these indicators to assess whether the needs can be safely met at the Mental Health Social Support level, or whether the distressed person -- the potential helpee -- should be referred to a general practitioner or other specialised person. Overconfidence on the part of the mental health social supporter, leading to a failure to refer, can have damaging outcomes for the helpee, with subsequent consequences for the mental health social supporter (Gilbert, Allan, Nicholls and Olsen, 2005).
 
Is Mental Health Social Support needed?
 
The first question is: does the person that mental health social supporter is observing need their assistance? The mental health social supporter may be a person with high empathy. People who have what are commonly called “people skills” – that is, empathy – are often very competent at recognising signs of distress in others. But it is useful to discern whether it is true empathy, or merely sympathy.
 
Sympathy, which is about feeling sorry for another person, can interfere with the goal of providing the helpee with the right assistance, at the right time, in the right way, by the right helper. Empathy, on the other hand, refers to the more complex skill of “seeing the world through the eyes of the other person”. It is a necessary skill for effective Mental Health Social Support, whereas sympathy is less useful.
 
If the mental health social supporter can describe the person they are observing in a way that would allow a third party who has not met the person to understand what is happening for them, they are likely to be most accurate, and thus most helpful, with minimal distraction from “sympathy”. An empathetic and discerning observation is likely to yield the most appropriate course of action. With that in mind, here is the first group of aspects for a mental health social supporter to recognise:
 
Speech: What is the person’s tone of voice: calm or anxious, stressed or subdued? Is there anything about the person’s speech that suggests distress or depression: a lack of clarity in speech, general disinterest, or agitation or anxiety?
 
Clothing: If the person is known to the mental health social supporter, have there been any changes in the way of dressing, the clothing chosen, or its appropriateness to the present situation? Is the clothing “out-of-character” for this person?
 
For a new acquaintance, what impression does the social supporter form of this person’s present state of mind, as suggested by their dress? Is the person merely “different” - perhaps just eccentric - or might there be more to it? As with all the indicators mentioned in this section, being mindful of judging others by your one’s standards is vital. A homeless person is unlikely to observe the prevailing social standards of appearance and dress, and yet the person may be quite well adjusted.
 
Body, posture, and way of walking: What can the social supporter reasonably detect from the person’s stance and movement? How do they walk - with confidence, or in a way that indicates a lack of energy or drive?
 
Bodily movements: Is there fidgeting, restlessness or agitation? Is there a lack of animation, and apparent lethargy?
 
Facial expressions: What is their eye contact like? Is the social supporter’s gaze returned? Is the person’s gaze averted, or eye contact avoided? Is there noticeable disinterest? Is there an indication in facial expressions of emotions being suppressed?
 
Feeling in the social supporter: Perhaps the social supporter notices that they feel somewhat depressed in this person’s company. These emotions may be the social supporter’s own, but on the other hand this person may trigger this reaction in others as well, meaning that what is happening (feelings) could be a clue to problems in the person’s relational style (adapted from Young, 2005).
 
General impressions: Is this person in touch with reality? Are they aware of their surroundings, time of day, and the weather? Are there difficulties with memory, attention, or concentration (Young, 2005)?
 
Mental and emotional symptoms of distress
 
Mental health problems, including depression and anxiety disorders, appear to be on the increase (Fombonne, 1999). There is evidence that fewer than 14 percent of people with disorders are receiving treatment for them (Bebbington, Brugha, Meltzer, Jenkins, Ceresa, Farrell, and Lewis, 2000). Mental problems get worse over time, yet communities are struggling to cope with the current level of problems (Bebbington, et al, 2000).
 
The checklist below, adapted from the Adult Psychological Symptoms Checklist (Gilbert et al, 2005) describes the major mental and emotional symptoms of un-wellness of individuals who are well enough to reside in the community (as opposed to in an institution).
 
Anxiety symptoms:
 
-       Specific fears (e.g., of animals, heights, thunderstorms)
-       Feelings of intense fear coming “out of the blue”, possibly with racing heart, difficulty breathing, and thoughts that something bad will happen soon
-       Fear of going out of the house
-       Feelings of un-realness, as if watching one’s life as a film
-       Worry that there is something wrong with one’s body and needing constant reassurance that there is not a physical illness
-       Generalised feelings of anxiety, but not being certain of the cause of the anxiety
-       Repetitive thoughts, images, or ideas coming into the mind which are frightening and hard to dismiss
-       A compulsion to check things or clean repetitively because of fear about something happening
-       Anxiety that important people in one’s life might leave
-       Avoidance of situations because of fear about what others may think or feel about one
-       Fears that certain people are out to harm one in some way
-       Difficulty getting over a major event in one’s life, and images of the event coming to mind again and again
 
Mood symptoms:
 
-       Losing the ability to enjoy or take interest in things going on around, as if life has become empty
-       Feeling tired with little energy
-       Losing sleep or sleeping poorly
-       Suffering from various aches and pains in the body and generally feeling that one is not right physically
-       Having sexual difficulties or worries
-       Feeling like life is hopeless and that that is unlikely to change in the future
-       Being in a state of grief from the loss or death of someone close
-       Suffering from change in mood since having a baby
-       Feeling so excited for no obvious reason that one cannot sleep, and so brimming with ideas that one can hardly focus
-       Mood changing for no reason: some days are good, but other days are terrible
-       Mood change strongly at certain times of the month
-       Suicidal thoughts: feeling like ending it all
 
Impulse control symptoms
 
-       Anorexia: dieting because of fear of gaining weight, and keeping weight well below what it should be
-       Bulimia: binge eating until it is not possible to eat any more
-       Vomiting: vomiting to get rid of food which has been eaten
-       Laxative use: using laxatives to avoid putting on weight
-       Using any non-prescribed drugs to induce various feelings or states of mind
-       Finding difficulty going more than a day or two without alcohol
-       Deliberately hurting oneself
-       Finding it difficult to control one’s temper and lashing out
-       Feeling like one is boiling up inside with anger, but being unable to express it
-       Impulsively doing things that one later regrets
 
Supporters should keep the above examples of symptoms in mind while thinking about whether a person might need Mental Health Social Support. Some people compensate for their symptoms and cope to their own satisfaction, whereas others do not.
 
Mental Health Social Support is a broad-based way of helping those who may need mental, emotional, or social support; receiving it is highly correlated to wellbeing. It is offered in myriad situations in communities around the world, and there are many roles a mental health social supporter can take up. It is important to be able to recognise the symptoms in someone that signal distress, in order to assess whether support should be offered, and to be able to work out who is best trained to offer the help.
 
It is also important to understand that Mental Health Social Support may not have a positive impact if it is offered in a dismissive, judging way, or by someone who is either in conflict with the helpee, or in competition with other helpers.
 
Source: Mental Health Social Support eCourse
 
 
Get MHSS Certified and help others in your community: https://www.mhss.net.au/lz
 
 
References:
 
Bebbington, P.E., Brugha, T.S., Meltzer, H., Jenkins, R., Ceresa, C., Farrell, M., & Lewis, G. (2000). Neurotic disorders and the receipt of psychiatric treatment. Psychological Medicine, 30, 1369—1376.
 
Chu, P.S., Saucier, D.I., and Hafner, E. (2010). Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, 29 (6), pp. 624-645.
 
Clifford, D. L. (1976). A comparative study of helping patterns in eight urban communities (Doctoral dissertation, University of Michigan, Dissertation Abstracts International, 1976, 37, 1838A. (University Microfilms No. 76-19,108), in Gottlieb, B., and Schroter, C. (1978). Professional Psychology, American Psychological Association, Inc., 614. Retrieved from: 0033- 0175/78/0904-0614S00.75.
 
Gilbert, P., Allan, S., Nicholls, W., and Olsen, K. (2005). The assessment of psychological symptoms of patients referred to community mental health teams: Distress, chronicity and life interference. Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy. 12, 10-27. Mental Health Social Support Student Workbook 20-21, www.mhss.aipc.net.au.
 
Gottlieb, B., and Schroter, C. (1978). Professional Psychology, American Psychological Association, Inc., 614.Sourced from: 0033-0175/78/0904-0614S00.75.
 
Gottlieb, B. H. (1978). The development and application of a classification scheme of informal helping behaviors. Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science, 10, 105-115, in Gottlieb, B., and Schroter, C, November (1978). Professional Psychology, American Psychological Association, Inc., 614. Retrieved from: 0033-0175/78/0904-0614S00.75.
 
Luborsky, W., Auerbach, A. H., Chandler, H., & Cohen, J. (1971). Factors influencing the outcome of psychotherapy: A review of quantitative research. Psychological Bulletin, 75, 145- 185, in Gottlieb, B., and Schroter, C, (1978), Professional Psychology, American Psychological Association, Inc., 614. Retrieved from: 0033-0175/78/0904-0614S00.75.
 
Young, M. (2005). Learning the art of helping: building blocks and techniques. New Jersey: Pearson/Merrill Prentice Hall.
 
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Intobookstore
The Institute has a list of recommended textbooks and DVDs which can add great value to your learning journey - and the good news is that you can purchase them very easily. The AIPC bookstore will give YOU:
 
-      Discounted prices!
-      Easy ordering method!
-      Quality guarantee!
 
This fortnight's feature is...
 
Name: Case Approach to Counseling and Psychotherapy
Authors: Corey, Gerald
AIPC Code: COREY2
AIPC Price: $94.46 (RRP $104.95)
ISBN: 978-049-555-3342
 
Organised to allow different theories to be compared easily, this book illustrates the skilful application of theory and allows you to learn by seeing a therapeutic approach in action.
 
To order this book, simply contact your nearest Student Support Centre or the AIPC Head Office (1800 657 667).
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Intoarticles
 
A Case Outlining How to Focus on Solutions
 
Michelle has come to counselling due to increasing feelings of hopelessness about the direction of her life. She is complaining that she is too “bogged down” in her problems to see where she should be going. This is Michelle’s second session with the Counsellor.
 
She has spent her previous session discussing the areas of her life that she is unhappy with. Within this session, the Counsellor decides to trial a solution-focussed approach with Michelle. The Counsellor hopes to move Michelle onto discussing ways she can overcome the problems that she has described by focussing more on solutions rather than problem descriptions.
 
For ease of writing, the Professional Counsellor is abbreviated to “C”.
 
Click here to continue reading this article...
 
 
The Meaning of Intimacy
 
Intimacy is a journey – it is not a tangible thing. It takes place over time, is ever-changing and is not stagnant. In fact, any kind of stagnation in a relationship kills intimacy.
 
Intimacy can also take many forms. One form of intimacy is cognitive or intellectual intimacy where two people exchange thoughts, share ideas and enjoy similarities and differences between their opinions. If they can do this in an open and comfortable way, they can become quite intimate in an intellectual area.
 
A second form of intimacy is experiential intimacy where people get together to actively involve themselves with each other in mutual activities. This can range from a couple to a group of many people and doesn’t always involve talking or sharing but may just include activities – for example, a group of women all working together on a quilt.
 
Click here to continue reading this article...
 
Other articles: www.aipc.net.au/articles
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Intodevelopment
 
Convenient Professional Development
 
Hundreds of counsellors, psychologists, social workers, mental health nurses and allied health professionals already access over 100 Hours of Professional Development online, for less than $1 a day. Now it's your turn.
 
Mental Health Academy (MHA) is the leading provider of professional development education for the mental health industry. MHA provides the largest variety of courses and videos workshops, all conveniently delivered via the internet.
 
With MHA, you no longer have to worry about high costs, proximity and availability, or fitting a workshop around your lifestyle!
 
You can access the huge range of PD, including courses and video workshops, whenever and from wherever you want.
 
Whether you are looking for courses on anxiety and depression, or a video workshop discussing the intricacies of relationship counselling - Mental Health Academy is your gateway to over 100 hours of professional development content.
 
Take a quick look at what Mental Health Academy offers:
 
-      Over 70 professionally developed courses.
-      On-demand, webstreamed video workshops.
-      Over 100 hours of professional development.
-      Extremely relevant topics.
-      New courses released every month.
-      Video supported training.
-      Online, 24/7 access to resources.
-      Endorsement by multiple Associations, including AASW, ACA and APS.
 
Begin your journey today. Click on the link below to register for a monthly or annual unlimited membership. As an unlimited member, you can access all MHA courses for less than $1 per day, and receive discounts when purchasing any video workshops:
 
 
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Intoconnection
Have you visited the new Counselling Connection Blog yet? There are over 500 interesting posts including case studies, profiles, success stories, videos and much more. Make sure you too get connected (and thank you for those who have already submitted comments and suggestions).
 
Mental Health Social Support: What’s in it for you?
 
Why do you want to become a mental health social supporter? Are you caring for someone now? Is it a relative or friend? If you are supporting someone, why are you doing it: do you want to, or do you feel obliged? Maybe you’re a founding member of a community chapter of Gamblers Anonymous, and you reluctantly front up to the meetings because – even though you’re a long-ago recovered gambler – the group would falter if you didn’t lend your energy...
 
Or perhaps you are supporting your friend who is caring for a chronically ill parent. The support work is intense, but you do it because you just want to help – and your friend has always been there for you. There are so many reasons why we do the things we do. In this post we look at some typical motivations for being a mental health social supporter. With each one, we’ll discuss first the need or motivation that a support person may have for helping, and then alert you to a possible “hidden” motivation (often, hidden from even the helper) that may lie within the more obvious need.
 
Click here to read the full post...
 
Get new Counselling Connection posts delivered by email! Simply visit our FeedBurner subscription page and click the link on the subscription box: https://feeds.feedburner.com/CounsellingConnection.
 
 
Help those around you suffering mental illness in silence: https://www.mhss.net.au/lz
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Intotwitter
Follow us on Twitter and get the latest and greatest in counselling news. To follow, visit https://twitter.com/counsellingnews and click "Follow".
 
Featured Tweets
 
The art of noticing: Being mindful of how the losses of life affect us https://bit.ly/shTlPk
 
Several brain researchers in Forbes list of 30 scientists aged under 30 who are making a difference: https://onforb.es/uuIJdk
 
Binge eating is linked with depression, according to study https://bit.ly/uRdXay
 
Counselors regularly help clients with transitions, but that doesn’t mean counselors won’t face challenges of their own https://bit.ly/u2eoPl
 
Indecisiveness over the little things can lead to overall unhappiness, study warns https://bit.ly/rxpFBf
 
Solution-Focused Communication Skills Training: https://www.aipc.net.au/articles/?p=233
 
Facebook is set to pair depressed users with crisis counselors: https://bit.ly/t6Bddc
 
Note that you need a Twitter profile to follow a list. If you do not have one yet, visit https://twitter.com to create a free profile today!
 
Tweet Count: 3165
Follower Count: 4050
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Intoquotes
"Other things may change us, but we start and end with family."
 
~ Anthony Brandt
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Intoseminars
Many students of the Diploma of Counselling attend seminars to complete the practical requirements of their course. Seminars provide an ideal opportunity to network with other students and liaise with qualified counselling professionals in conjunction with completing compulsory coursework.
 
 
Below are the seminars dates for the first semester of 2012. To register for a seminar, please contact your Student Support Centre.
 
To access the full list of 2012 seminars, visit: www.aipc.net.au/timetables.php.
 
BRISBANE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 03/03, 26/05
Communication Skills II - 04/02, 21/04, 23/06
The Counselling Process - 11/02, 28/04
Counselling Therapies I - 24-25/03, 16-17/06
Counselling Therapies II - 14-15/04
Case Management - 18-19/02, 14-15/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 25/02, 09/06
Counselling Applications - 10/03
 
CDA Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 03/03, 26/05
Communication Skills II - 04/02, 21/04, 23/06
The Counselling Process - 11/02, 28/04
Counselling Therapies I - 24-25/03, 16-17/06
Counselling Therapies II - 14-15/04
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 12/05
Family Therapy - 02/06
Case Management - 18-19/02, 14-15/06
 
GOLD COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 25/02, 19/05
Communication Skills II - 17/03, 16/06
The Counselling Process - 21/01, 21/04
Counselling Therapies I - 23-24/03
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/05
Case Management - 30-31/03
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 20/01
Counselling Applications - 03/02
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 21/01, 21/04
Communication Skills I - 25/02, 19/05
Communication Skills II - 17/03, 16/06
Counselling Therapies I - 23-24/03
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 20/4
Family Therapy - 15/06
Case Management - 30-31/03
 
MELBOURNE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 05/02, 03/03, 14/04, 06/05, 03/06
Communication Skills II - 8/01, 11/02, 04/03, 15/04, 12/05, 09/06
The Counselling Process - 13/01, 04/02, 02/03, 01/04, 05/05, 02/06
Counselling Therapies I - 14-15/01, 18-19/02, 17-18/03, 21-22/04, 19-20/05, 16-17/06
Counselling Therapies II - 21-22/01, 25-26/02, 24-25/03, 28-29/04, 26-27/05, 23-24/06
Case Management - 28-29/01, 31/03-01/04, 30/06-01/07
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 12/02, 13/05
Counselling Applications - 28/01, 14/04
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 13/01, 04/02, 02/03, 01/04, 05/05, 02/06
Communication Skills I - 07/05, 05/02, 03/03, 14/04, 06/05, 03/06
Communication Skills II - 8/01, 11/02, 04/03, 15/04, 12/05, 09/06
Counselling Therapies I - 14-15/01, 18-19/02, 17-18/03, 21-22/04, 19-20/05, 16-17/06
Counselling Therapies II - 21-22/01, 25-26/02, 24-25/03, 28-29/04, 26-27/05, 23-24/06
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 12/02, 13/05
Family Therapy - 26/02, 10/06
Case Management - 28-29/01, 31/03-01/04, 30/06-01/07
 
NORTHERN TERRITORY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 14/04
The Counselling Process - 25/02
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/03
Counselling Therapies II - 28/04, 05/05
Case Management - 11-12/02
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 10/03, 09/06
Counselling Applications - 12/05
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 25/02
Communication Skills I - 14/04
Communication Skills II - 23/07
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/03
Counselling Therapies II - 28/04, 05/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 16/06
Family Therapy - 21/04, 15/09
Case Management - 11-12/02
 
SOUTH AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 04/02, 24/03, 19/05
Communication Skills II - 05/02, 25/03, 20/05
The Counselling Process - 18/02, 01/04, 02/06
Counselling Therapies I - 28-29/04
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/02, 23-24/06
Case Management - 03-04/03
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 28/01, 05/05
Counselling Applications - 11/02, 16/06
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 18/02, 01/04, 02/06
Communication Skills I - 04/02, 24/03, 19/05
Communication Skills II - 05/02, 25/03, 20/05
Counselling Therapies I - 28-29/04
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/02, 23-24/06
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 29/01, 06/05
Family Therapy - 12/02, 17/06
Case Management - 03-04/03
 
SUNSHINE COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 19/05
Communication Skills II - 20/05
The Counselling Process - 31/03, 30/06
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/03
Counselling Therapies II - 26-27/05
Case Management - 23-24/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 28/04
Counselling Applications - 14/07
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 31/03, 30/06
Communication Skills I - 19/05
Communication Skills II - 20/05
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/03
Counselling Therapies II - 26-27/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 14/04
Family Therapy - 02/06
Case Management - 23-24/06
 
SYDNEY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 20/01, 25/02, 27/03, 28/04, 05/06
Communication Skills II - 21/01, 29/02, 28/03, 05/05, 18/06
The Counselling Process - 14/01, 02/02, 18/02, 05/03, 26/03, 21/04, 12/05, 04/06, 21/06
Counselling Therapies I - 30-31/01, 02-03/03, 23-24/04, 15-16/06
Counselling Therapies II - 16-17/02, 29-30/03, 17-18/05, 29-30/06
Case Management - 09-10/02, 02-03/04, 22-23/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 23/02, 07/05
Counselling Applications - 24/02, 08/05
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 14/01, 02/02, 18/02, 05/03, 26/03, 21/04, 12/05, 04/06, 21/06
Communication Skills I - 20/01, 25/02, 27/03, 28/04, 05/06
Communication Skills II - 21/01, 29/02, 28/03, 05/05, 18/06
Counselling Therapies I - 30-31/01, 02-03/03, 23-24/04, 15-16/06
Counselling Therapies II - 16-17/02, 29-30/03, 17-18/05, 29-30/06
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 23/01, 24/03, 26/05
Family Therapy - 24/01, 31/03, 01/06
Case Management - 09-10/02, 02-03/04, 22-23/06
 
TASMANIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 25/03, 24/06
Communication Skills II - 05/02, 06/05
The Counselling Process - 19/02, 20/05
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/03
Counselling Therapies II - 29-30/04
Case Management - 14-15/04
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 26/02, 17/06
Counselling Applications - 01/04
 
CDA Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 25/03, 24/06
Communication Skills II - 05/02, 06/05
The Counselling Process - 19/02, 20/05
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/03
Counselling Therapies II - 29-30/04
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 27/05
Family Therapy - 11/03
Case Management - 14-15/04
 
WESTERN AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 07/01, 11/02, 10/03, 28/04, 26/05, 07/06
Communication Skills II - 08/01, 12/02, 11/03, 29/04, 27/05
The Counselling Process - 14/01, 18/02, 17/03, 14/04, 12/05
Counselling Therapies I - 21-22/01, 21-22/04, 09-10/06
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/02, 05-06/05
Case Management - 28-29/01, 19-20/05
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 19/02, 16/06
Counselling Applications - 18/03
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 14/01, 18/02, 17/03, 14/04, 12/05
Communication Skills I - 07/01, 11/02, 10/03, 28/04, 26/05, 07/06
Communication Skills II - 08/01, 12/02, 11/03, 29/04, 27/05
Counselling Therapies I - 21-22/01, 21-22/04, 09-10/06
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/02, 05-06/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 03/03, 02/06
Family Therapy - 04/03
Case Management - 28-29/01, 19-20/05
 
Important Note: Advertising of the dates above does not guarantee availability of places in the seminar. Please check availability with the respective Student Support Centre.
 
 
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