AIPC Institute InBrief
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In this Issue

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bullet Hello!
bullet Intothediploma
bullet Intonews
bullet Intocounselling
bullet Intoqualifications
bullet Intobookstore
bullet Intoarticles
bullet Intodevelopment
bullet Intoconnection
bullet Intotwitter
bullet Intoquotes
bullet Intoseminars
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Editor: Sandra Poletto
Email: ezine@aipc.net.au
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Copyright: 2012 Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors

Hello!
Welcome to Edition 147 of Institute Inbrief. Parents can play the key role in initiating and generating behaviour change in their children. In this edition’s featured article, we explore how counsellors can effectively work with parents to improve therapeutic outcomes for children.  
 
Also in this edition:
 
-      New Counselling Connection Blog
-      Previously Published Articles
-      Professional Development news
-      Blog and Twitter updates
-      Upcoming seminar dates
 
If you would like to access daily articles & resources, and interact with over 4000 peers, make sure you join our Facebook community today: www.facebook.com/counsellors. It is a great way to stay in touch and share your interest and knowledge in counselling.
 
Enjoy your reading,
 
Editor.
 
 
Join our community:
 
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Intothediploma
The Diploma of Counselling is supported by a number of optional Advanced Study Majors (ASMs). Advanced Study Majors allow you to study and gain advanced knowledge and skill in the specialised counselling area of your choice.
 
The Advanced Study Major Program involves the completion of one or more optional Advanced Study Majors in addition to the Diploma of Counselling. The Majors provide you with the opportunity to specialise in any of the following highly relevant fields of counselling:
 
-      Abuse Counselling
-      Relationship Counselling and Conflict Resolution
-      Career Counselling
-      Grief and Loss Counselling
-      Child Development and Effective Parenting
-      Workplace Counselling
-      Counselling Clients with Addictions
-      Family Therapy
 
The Majors are specifically designed to provide you with a higher level of practical and theoretical knowledge in a specialised field of counselling. You are able to enrol into an Advanced Study Major at the time of your enrolment into the Diploma of Counselling, or at any subsequent time. The advantage of early enrolment in an Advanced Study Major is that studies can be completed concurrently with your Diploma. There is also no limit on the number of Advanced Study Majors you can undertake.
 
The Advanced Study Majors can be completed by either a home-study or face-to-face mode of study. Studying your ASM via the traditional home-study option follows a similar process as to completing your studies for the Diploma. Students are sent a workbook and readings for the ASM and submit their assessment for marking.
 
Alternatively, students are also able to complete their ASM by attending a workshop. Many students enjoy the interactive, practical workshops because they are a refreshing change from the traditional external study method and provide the opportunity to meet other students. Students also have the flexibility to change into this mode of study even after selecting the home-study option.
 
Click here for more information about each ASM.
 
For further information about the Diploma, please contact your closest Student Support Centre or visit www.aipc.net.au/lz.
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Intonews
 
The New Face of Counselling Connection
 
AIPC’s official Blog – www.counsellingconnection.com – has just received a face-lift. The new template provides vastly improved navigation, new social media tools to help you share content with your friends and colleagues, and over 500 blog posts divided into 8 categories.  
 
Readers can also access a range of free educational resources and publications via the “Resources” page and get useful information on training programs via the “Training” section. The Blog’s newly designed footer also includes a range of useful links and contact details.
 
Experience the Blog first-hand: Visit www.counsellingconnection.com and explore our top index links or search for keywords using the top-right search function. And don’t forget to forward the link to friends and colleagues who are interested in counselling and life effectiveness tips.
 
 
 
Free Role-Play Videos – Watch Now
 
There’s no better way to learn or fine tune your skills than watching a professional perform them. Right now you can visit our Facebook page to see first-hand how counselling professionals apply 5 counselling therapies in a live environment:
 
2/ Click the ‘Video’ link on the left-side menu (under the AIPC Logo);
3/ Then click the video thumbnails to explore each video.
 
And while you’re there, make sure you click the LIKE button at the top of the page so you can receive updates each time we upload new videos and resources. If you have friends or colleagues who’d also be interested in these videos, please be sure to use the share buttons to let them know about it.
 
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Intocounselling
 
Counsellors Working with Parents
 
Parents can play the key role in initiating and generating behaviour change in their children. Parents have the potential to inspire their children directly (by applying reinforcers and other behaviour modification strategies) and indirectly (by providing a safe, supportive and encouraging environment). As counsellors, working with parents can enhance our potential to promote successful outcomes for our child clients.
 
Respect for the client (parent and child) is essential for encouraging positive relationships. Experienced counsellors will include parents (as appropriate) in child focused counselling so that the parents' skills and experience can be incorporated into interventions, and counselling strategies can be smoothly transferred to the home environment.
 
If counsellors are unable to work with parents they may find that their work with the child is undermined or sabotaged by a parent who feels neglected or uninvolved. In addition, parents could remove their child from counselling if they believe their child is becoming too close to the counsellor, and perceive this closeness as a threat to them. 
 
When parents (who are clients) approach the counselling environment their experience will largely depend upon whether they are voluntary or involuntary clients. The counsellor must be prepared for the different reactions that parents can present with.
 
For example:
 
Parents may be defensive, scared, suspicious, guilty, shameful or angry. They may also be anxious and confused. As identified in the Bristol Inquiry on Support and Counselling for Parents in Acute Health Care Settings, (1999, p 7-10), conducted in the UK, for parents a lack of familiarity, not understanding the system, and not knowing who to ask questions of can be stressful. Isolation from their usual social network, external family and other resources will also increase their stress levels.
 
If the parents are involuntary clients, and have lost their role as a parent; this could alter the parents' view of themselves as protectors and nurturers; hence the relinquishment of their parental responsibilities to an outsider could have a profound effect on how they now perceive themselves and this will directly affect their behaviour towards the counsellor.
 
Waiting has been identified as one of the most stressful parts of the process for parents who are waiting to hear news regarding decisions relating to their children. Families can often feel forgotten or neglected by the system. Manifestations (Bristol Inquiry 1999) of waiting when an outcome is not known can include fear, fatigue, anxiety, lack of concentration, restlessness, inability to eat or drink, anger and frustration.
 
Therefore it is vital that the counsellor has the necessary skills (clarification, paraphrasing, reflection of feelings, reflection of content, summarising and normalising to name a few), to assist the parent client/s to feel at ease in discussing the issues that have come about in their family.
 
To do this, the counsellor can begin to dispel the mystery of the counselling session by explanation of the counselling process. To take away the “unknown fear” is imperative to honest communication and building trust. This does not have to be a detailed version, but simply an explanation as to why they have attended counselling. 
 
Remember, if the parents are voluntary clients they will know the reason why they have chosen to seek the assistance of a counsellor, but still may not be sure of the process. If the parents are involuntary clients, they also may not be exactly sure why they have to attend a counselling session, or what is expected of them and they may also not be aware of the counselling process.
 
Of a high priority to many clients are the boundaries of confidentiality. Clients must be aware at all times of the counsellor's legal and ethical obligations to the community, the law and him or herself. Full disclosure of who could be privy to the counselling session is necessary to respect the rights of the client. 
 
A discussion of expectations should also be included in the initial stages. Many individuals who are not familiar with counsellors or the allied health industry have a skewed perception of what the counsellor can do. Some individuals accept no responsibility for their behavioural change and expect that the counsellor with his/her intimate knowledge of the human mind will enable the client's issues to magically vanish by simply “chatting” and without any effort at all from the client.
 
Many counsellors will draw up a counselling contract with their clients. This is sometimes called a psychological contract, or an action plan. The importance of this document is to illustrate to the client that a verbal agreement which is then put in writing brings about clarification of what is expected from both the client (parents) and the counsellor; it adds accountability to the process and encourages motivated commitment from all parties to attempt to bring about some change in the situation or in a specific behaviour.
 
Sometimes the formality of the counselling session can increase the levels of anxiety for already anxious parents. When individuals are anxious they tend to breathe faster and take smaller shallower breaths. This reduces oxygen to the system; anxiety begins to rise, so we tend to breathe still faster to counteract the rising anxiety, so forms the vicious cycle of stress. Taking deep measured breaths activates the parasympathetic nervous system, which then triggers the brain to release dopamine to bring about a sense of relaxation and calm.
 
If parents seem to be anxious or overly stressed suggest a short break or a few minutes of deep breathing exercises. This can help to quickly reduce anxiety and build rapport between parent and counsellor through empathy.
 
How counsellors behave towards parents and their style of interaction contributes to the effectiveness of the counselling sessions and is important for promoting positive outcomes.
 
Counsellors who are enthusiastic, self-confident, flexible, show ability for analytical thinking, are honest and compassionate, without being judgemental and with a sense of humour have been found to be the most effective (Ollier et al., 2001). 
 
The first meeting with the parent is of the utmost importance to creating a positive first impression and ensuring they will return. Regardless of whether the first appointment is made via phone or letter, it is vital that details are given to the parents as to how to get to the clinic or office. If possible the parking arrangements and public transport details could not only benefit the parents, but also be the foundation of a positive interaction at the first appointment. 
 
Details of payment are also useful to ensure clients have a means of payment or if they are unable to make the payment at the appointment, to make other arrangements and not feel “caught out” on the day.
 
To give a pamphlet or information sheet about the services that your or your organisation provides, some information about the organisation and information about the counselling process could minimise stress for parents and assist to put them at ease. 
 
Creating a warm and welcoming office conveys a supportive atmosphere, compared to the infamous stark sterilization of hospital wards in days gone by. Ensure your desk is tidy and all client files are locked away.
 
If younger children come with their parents, a box of soft cuddly toys or puzzles, books and games are a good combination to distract the young child while the parents can relax and talk to you.
 
Reduce distractions when you are with your clients. Divert phone calls so that you can give your client uninterrupted attention. This indicates respect and commitment to the parent. If you must take a phone call while with a client, keep it as short as possible.
 
Encouraging Parents to Talk
 
Parenting and parenting styles can be a contentious issue. Sometimes a counsellor's values and beliefs will be similar to the parent/client, but often they will be vastly different (Geldard & Geldard, 2005). If a counsellor is to be able to assist a client whose parenting styles and values are different from their own, then it is imperative that the counsellor understand the client's world in the context of the client and not themselves.
 
It is not unusual for some parents to smack their children and use forms of corporal punishment. Many professionals especially in the counselling field prefer to use Time Out (a negative punishment) or reinforcements for positive behaviours. But it must be remembered that clients often have varying backgrounds, values and experiences, all of which contribute to their view of discipline. This of course does not mean that the parent client is right or that their parenting styles and values must not be challenged, but that challenge must come from a counsellor who is empathic to the parent and not judgemental.
 
When an individual feels or senses that they are being judged (Geldard & Geldard, 2005), they become inhibited, less trusting and less honest. Only when an individual feels accepted for who they are and not what they do can behavioural changes take place.
Parenting styles
 
There are four recognised parenting styles, (Bukatko and Daehler, 2001): Indulgent (sometimes also called Permissive), Authoritarian, Authoritative and Uninvolved (sometimes called Neglectful).
 
Briefly, Indulgent parenting consists of setting few boundaries for children and low to moderate nurturing. The Authoritarian parent style includes harsh and controlling boundaries with strict obedience to rules. A demand for respect with little flexibility, there is little to no nurturing.
 
The Authoritative parenting style uses positive reinforcement rather than punishment; these parents tend to behave in a mature fashion towards their children encouraging dialogue with their children while being supportive and nurturing.
 
The Uninvolved parent is emotionally detached from the child and focuses on their own needs as opposed to the child's. Few boundaries exist with little to no nurturance in the parent and child relationship.
 
When parents first present to the counsellor, part of the assessment a counsellor must take into account is whether the incident or reason that the parents are seeking advice is an isolated “one off” occurrence that has caused them concern or if the issue needing to be addressed is on-going or has a history.
 
Normalising
 
All individuals will experience anxiety in a new or unknown environment, regardless of how confident they may be in their lives. Therefore, what might be considered a minor concern to the experienced counsellor, can be quite traumatic for the parent.
 
The process of normalisation (Geldard & Geldard, 2005) could be most useful to the confused or anxious parent. The counsellor can give the parent information that assists them to understand that their reactions to their particular situation is understandable and acceptable: quite normal under their particular circumstances. Normalisation can assist the parent to accept that they are not being judged by the counsellor.
 
Counsellors my find it challenging to motivate parents to change their perspective in order to change behaviours. Many parents are not aware that their parenting styles (Barber, 1996) need to correspond with the child's age. Some parents will treat their teenagers similarly to the way they treat their two year olds, by not allowing them to take responsibility or accountability for their actions around the home. Yet others will load their toddlers up with all the problems of the world.
 
It is often helpful to introduce parents to Erikson's Psychosocial Stages of Development to assist parents to understand the necessity of changing parental styles in accordance with the child's age (Carlson, Heth, Miller, Donahoe, Buskist & Martin, 2007).
 
Empathy
 
Empathic communication especially with parents is vitally important. Counsellors will be aware of the advantages of open questions which encourage clients to explain and expand with their responses (Pelling, Bowers & Armstrong, 2007). When combined with active listening and empathic responses, open questions can assist parents in expressing their feelings and concerns. Empathic responses also encourage the client to share more information because they feel understood and accepted. 
 
It must be remembered that all the other counselling skills such as attending, observation, closed questions, encouraging, paraphrasing and summarising (to name a few) are equally as important and have their strategic place when counsellors are assisting parents to share information and gain insight into their behaviour. 
 
Client types
 
Many parents who have come to the counselling session are prepared to speak with the counsellor to gain some insight into an issue or problem. But some parents do not understand why they need to be involved in the counselling sessions, and others know why, but do not want to be involved.
 
Some parents are silent, (Ollier, and Hobday, 2001). Maybe their anxiety is due to their fear of being blamed for their child's behaviour. It is important for the counsellor to explain that if a child does partake in negative behaviour, it is not always because something is happening at home, sometimes the cause can be associated with school or friends and acquaintances. Encourage the parents to work with you to find a solution.
 
Dependent parents can believe that the counsellor will “fix the problem” or they can become dependent upon meeting with the counsellor because they leave the counsellor feeling positive. Encourage the parent to take responsibility for their decisions, encourage autonomy.
 
Aggressive parents need a different strategy altogether. Never see these clients late in the afternoon or when you could be in the office alone. Always ensure you have an “emergency exit” plan in place if you find you need to quickly leave the room. If children are present, remove the children saying: “I'll just take the children out to the play area so we can discuss this matter ourselves”, or something similar.
 
In separated families, the division of loyalties can be difficult for children to manage. This can often raise issues as to which parent should be involved in the counselling session. Remember, with the use of open questions, empathic responses and the use of solution-focused therapy, the counsellor must always encourage the parents, to move toward working together to promote the best outcome for the child.
 
Foster carers and adoptive parents will probably never know the full extent of a particular child's past experiences (Ollier, et. al. 2001). As a significant number of foster care children and adopted children have been abused or neglected, they often suffer emotional disturbances that can cause behavioural problems. Gaining trust with these children is a common problem as many children will spend a lot of energy “testing the waters” to find how their new (foster or adoptive) parents will respond to provocation. This can cause the parents to have feelings of inadequacy.
 
References
 
Barber, B. K. (1996). Parental psychological control: Revisiting a neglected construct. Child Development, 67(6), 3296-3319.
 
Bukato, D., & Daehler, M. W., (2001). Child development: A thematic approach. New York: Houghton Mifflin Company.
 
Carlson, N., Heth, C., Miller, H., Donahoe, J., Buskist, W., & Martin, G. (2007). Psychology: The science of behaviour. USA: Pearson Education Inc.
 
Centre for Parenting and Research, NWS Dept. of Community Services, NSW, Australia (July 2007).
 
Danuta B. & Marvin W. D. (2001). Child development: A thematic approach. New York: Houghton Mifflin Company.
 
Geldard, D. and Geldard K. (2005). Basic Personal Counselling: a training manual for counsellors. NSW, Australia: Pearsons Education.
 
Nichols, M.P. & Schwartz R.C., (2001). Family therapy, concepts and methods. Massachusetts: Allan & Bacon.
 
Ollier, K., & Hobday, A. (2001) Creative therapy2: Working with parents. Victoria: Australian Council for Educational Research.
 
Pelling, N, Bowers, R. Armstrong, P. (2007). The practice of counselling. Victoria: Thomson.
 
 
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Intoqualifications
 
Learn How You Can Gain Specialty Expertise and a Graduate Qualification with a Vocational Graduate Certificate or Vocational Graduate Diploma in Counselling...
 
...In Only 6 to 12 Months
 
More and more Counsellors are gaining advanced specialist skills with a Vocational Graduate qualification. Vocational Graduate qualifications provide a higher level, vocational alternative to traditional Post Graduate courses offered by Universities.
 
It's time and cost effective, meaning you can gain a formal graduate qualification in 6 to 12 months in your specialist area. Here's how a graduate qualification can advance your career:
 
-      Develop a deeper understanding of your area of interest and achieve more optimal outcomes with your clients.
-      A graduate qualification will assist you move up the corporate ladder from practitioner to manager/ supervisor.
-      Make the shift from being a generalist practitioner to a specialist.
-      Gain greater professional recognition from your peers.
-      Increase client referrals from allied health professionals.
-      Maximise job opportunities in your preferred specialty area.
-      Formalise years of specialist experience with a respected qualification.
 
Save Over $6,000 (67% Discount to Market)
 
A Vocational Graduate Diploma at a university costs between $10,000 and $38,000. BUT, you don’t have to pay these exorbitant amounts for an equally high quality qualification. You can do your qualification with the Institute and save a massive $6,000+ on the cost of doing a similar course at university.
 
To learn more, please visit www.aipc.net.au/vgd. Alternatively, call your nearest Institute branch on the FreeCall numbers shown below.
 
Sydney: 1800 677 697
Melbourne: 1800 622 489
Perth: 1800 246 381
Brisbane: 1800 353 643
Adelaide: 1800 246 324
Regional NSW: 1800 625 329
Regional QLD: 1800 359 565
Gold Coast: 1800 625 359
NT/Tasmania: 1800 353 643
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Intobookstore
The Institute has a list of recommended textbooks and DVDs which can add great value to your learning journey - and the good news is that you can purchase them very easily. The AIPC bookstore will give YOU:
  
-      Discounted prices!
-      Easy ordering method!
-      Quality guarantee!
 
This fortnight's feature is...
 
Name: Psychology 8th edition package
Author: Wade, C. and Travis, Carol
AIPC Code: WADE
AIPC Price: $101.65 (RRP $112.95)
ISBN: 978-013-192-6844
 
This book defines models and practices critical and scientific thinking.
 
To order this book, simply contact your nearest Student Support Centre or the AIPC Head Office (1800 657 667).
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Intoarticles
 
Counselling an Adult with an Intellectual Impairment
 
Simone’s Employment Support Worker has arranged for her to receive counselling, with her consent, to assist her day and residential service provider to ascertain the cause of her recent behaviour change. Staff have observed that Simone is increasingly lethargic and withdrawn. An assessment by her GP eliminated any physical cause. The GP noted that while there was no evidence of depression, Simone seemed to be “troubled about something” and referred her to the Counsellor. Despite attempts from staff and Simone’s family to help Simone express her feelings and concerns, Simone continued to quietly deny that there were any problems.
 
Given that the purpose of the session was to assist Simone to identify her concerns so that her service-provider could then address the issues, no distinct therapeutic approach was used. The core conditions of counselling were applied, for example; empathy, unconditional positive regard, and respect for the client to foster a secure and comfortable counselling environment in which the client could safely explore and express her concerns.
 
The Counsellor utilised a visual language system to achieve the counselling goals. These communication systems are often used with people with intellectual impairments where their ability to understand pictures exceeds their ability to understand verbal expression. Various formal visual systems exist. The Counsellor chose to use Picture Communication Symbols (PCS) to represent the key questions.
 
For ease of writing, The Professional Counsellor is abbreviated to C.
 
Click here to continue reading this article...
 
Other articles: www.aipc.net.au/articles
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Intodevelopment
 
Convenient Professional Development
 
Hundreds of counsellors, psychologists, social workers, mental health nurses and allied health professionals already access over 100 Hours of Professional Development online, for less than $1 a day. Now it's your turn.
 
Mental Health Academy (MHA) is the leading provider of professional development education for the mental health industry. MHA provides the largest variety of courses and videos workshops, all conveniently delivered via the internet.
 
With MHA, you no longer have to worry about high costs, proximity and availability, or fitting a workshop around your lifestyle!
 
You can access the huge range of PD, including courses and video workshops, whenever and from wherever you want.
 
Whether you are looking for courses on anxiety and depression, or a video workshop discussing the intricacies of relationship counselling - Mental Health Academy is your gateway to over 100 hours of professional development content.
 
Take a quick look at what Mental Health Academy offers:
 
-      Over 70 professionally developed courses.
-      On-demand, webstreamed video workshops.
-      Over 100 hours of professional development.
-      Extremely relevant topics.
-      New courses released every month.
-      Video supported training.
-      Online, 24/7 access to resources.
-      Endorsement by multiple Associations, including AASW, ACA and APS.
 
Begin your journey today. Click on the link below to register for a monthly or annual unlimited membership. As an unlimited member, you can access all MHA courses for less than $1 per day, and receive discounts when purchasing any video workshops:
 
 
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Intoconnection
Have you visited Counselling Connection, the Institute's Blog yet? We continually publish new and interesting posts including case studies, profiles, success stories and much more. Make sure you too get connected (and thank you for those who have already submitted comments and suggestions).
 
Graduate Story – Jane Johnson
 
Four years ago I sat in a holiday unit staring at a selection of tablets that I, with a solid background in healthcare, was certain would take away all pain, permanently. I remember staring at the telephone in the room for an hour. Even now I do not know why I called 13 11 14 and spoke to Lifeline. The conversation was a turning point for me.
 
In February 2008 I was offered a role managing Lifeline Top End; a questionable honour as, at the time, it had lost its staff and funding and all that remained was a Board that believed in the service and a few trained telephone counselling volunteers anxious to continue to use their skills. I took the job on the basis that in six months I would have the service up and running, or would give valid reasons why the service was unviable.
 
Click here to continue reading this post...
 
Blog Email: blog@aipc.net.au
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Intotwitter
Follow us on Twitter and get the latest and greatest in counselling news. To follow, visit https://twitter.com/counsellingnews and click "Follow".
 
Featured Tweets
 
Research opportunity - The Australian Institute of Psychology and Bond University’s School of Psychology... https://bit.ly/qN3YlB
 
New model for treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder: Mouse model that replicates human OCD can point to more... https://bit.ly/oNFNfD  
 
Masters on the mind: https://bit.ly/naBmaR
 
New course - just released: Telephone Counselling: https://bit.ly/puPChE
 
Does that hurt? Objective way to measure pain being developed: https://bit.ly/njrga6
 
Motor memory: The long and short of it: https://bit.ly/nIpMLp
 
Confronting meaninglessness: https://bit.ly/pTHdwR
 
Note that you need a Twitter profile to follow a list. If you do not have one yet, visit https://twitter.com to create a free profile today!
 
Tweet Count: 2865
Follower Count: 3485
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Intoquotes
"You don't really understand human nature unless you know why a child on a merry-go-round will wave at his parents every time around - and why his parents will always wave back."
 
~ William D. Tammeus
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Intoseminars
Many students of the Diploma of Counselling attend seminars to complete the practical requirements of their course. Seminars provide an ideal opportunity to network with other students and liaise with qualified counselling professionals in conjunction with completing compulsory coursework.
 
Below are upcoming seminars dates in 2011. To register for a seminar, please contact your Student Support Centre.
 
To access the full list, visit: www.aipc.net.au/timetables.php.
 
Diploma of Counselling (CDA) Timetable
 
Northern Territory
The Counselling Process - 24/09, 04/12
Communication Skills I - 12/11
Communication Skills II - 03/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 05/11
Case Management - 26-27/11
 
South Australia
The Counselling Process - 24/09, 26/11
Communication Skills I - 15/10, 03/12
Communication Skills II - 16/10, 04/12
Counselling Therapies I - 12-13/11
Counselling Therapies II - 10-11/12
Family Therapy - 27/11
Case Management - 19-20/11
 
Sydney
The Counselling Process - 14/10, 31/10, 26/11, 12/12
Communication Skills I - 24/09, 21/10, 18/11, 14/12
Communication Skills II - 07/10, 30/11
Counselling Therapies I - 27-28/10, 01-02/12
Counselling Therapies II - 14-15/11
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 30/09, 21/11
Family Therapy - 13/10, 13/12
Case Management - 22-23/09, 24-25/11
 
Western Australia
The Counselling Process - 08/10, 05/11, 03/12
Communication Skills I - 29/10, 10/12
Communication Skills II - 30/10, 11/12
Counselling Therapies I - 26-27/11
Counselling Therapies II - 24-25/09, 17-18/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 09/10
Family Therapy - 04/12
Case Management - 12-13/11
 
Brisbane
The Counselling Process - 24/09, 27/11
Communication Skills I - 22/10, 03/12
Communication Skills II - 05/11
Counselling Therapies II - 29-30/10
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 27/08, 19/11
Family Therapy - 17/12
Case Management - 12-13/11
 
Tasmania
The Counselling Process - 27/11
Communication Skills I - 25/09, 18/12
Communication Skills II - 06/11
Counselling Therapies I - 19-20/11
Counselling Therapies II - 03-04/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 11/12
Family Therapy - 16/10
Case Management - 12-13/11
 
Melbourne
The Counselling Process - 24/09, 29/10, 19/11, 16/12
Communication Skills I - 29/10, 12/11, 03/12
Communication Skills II - 30/10, 13/11, 20/11, 04/12
Counselling Therapies I - 15-16/10, 26-27/11, 10-11/12
Counselling Therapies II - 24-25/09, 22-23/10, 19-20/11, 17-18/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 08/10
Family Therapy - 09/10
Case Management - 05-06/11
 
Sunshine Coast
Communication Skills I - 29/10
Communication Skills II - 30/10
Counselling Therapies II - 24-25/09
Case Management - 05-06/11
 
Gold Coast
The Counselling Process - 22/10, 03/12
Communication Skills I - 05/11
Communication Skills II - 17/12
Counselling Therapies I - 23-24/09
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/11
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 21/10
Case Management - 14-15/10
 
Diploma of Professional Counselling (DPCD) Timetable
 
Northern Territory
Communication Skills I - 12/11
Communication Skills II - 03/12
The Counselling Process - 24/09, 04/12
Counselling Therapies I - 19-20/11
Counselling Therapies II - 10-11/12
Case Management - 26-27/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 08/10
Counselling Applications - 29/10
 
South Australia
Communication Skills I - 03/12
Communication Skills II - 04/12
The Counselling Process - 24/09, 26/11
Counselling Therapies I - 12-13/11
Counselling Therapies II - 10-11/12
Case Management - 29-20/11
Counselling Applications - 25/09
 
Sydney
Communication Skills I - 24/09, 21/10, 18/11, 14/12
Communication Skills II - 07/10, 30/11
The Counselling Process - 14/10, 31/10, 26/11, 12/12
Counselling Therapies I - 27-28/10, 01-02/12
Counselling Therapies II - 14-15/11
Case Management - 22-23/09, 24-25/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 05/12
Counselling Applications - 17/10, 09/12
 
Western Australia
Communication Skills I - 29/10, 10/12
Communication Skills II - 30/10, 11/12
The Counselling Process - 08/10, 05/11, 03/12
Counselling Therapies I - 26-27/11
Counselling Therapies II - 24-25/09, 17-18/12
Case Management - 12-13/11
Counselling Applications - 06/11
 
Brisbane
Communication Skills I - 22/10, 03/12
Communication Skills II - 05/11
The Counselling Process - 24/09, 27/11
Counselling Therapies I - 10-11/12
Case Management - 12-13/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 15/10
Counselling Applications - 18/12
 
Tasmania
Communication Skills I - 25/09, 18/12
Communication Skills II - 06/11
The Counselling Process - 27/11
Case Management - 12-13/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 23/10
Counselling Applications - 30/10
 
Melbourne
Communication Skills I - 29/10, 12/11, 03/12
Communication Skills II - 30/10, 13/11, 20/11, 04/12
The Counselling Process - 24/09, 29/10, 19/11, 19/12, 16/12
Counselling Therapies I - 15-16/10, 26-27/11, 10-11/12
Counselling Therapies II - 24-25/09, 22-23/10, 19-20/11, 17-18/12
Case Management - 05-06/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 01/10
Counselling Applications - 02/10
 
Sunshine Coast
Communication Skills I - 29/10
Communication Skills II - 30/10
Counselling Therapies II - 24-25/09
Case Management - 05-06/11
Counselling Applications - 22/10
 
Gold Coast
 
Communication Skills I - 05/11
Communication Skills II - 17/12
The Counselling Process - 22/10, 03/12
Counselling Therapies I - 23-24/09
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/11
Case Management - 14-15/10
 
Important Note: Advertising of the dates above does not guarantee availability of places in the seminar. Please check availability with the respective Student Support Centre.
 
 
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