AIPC Institute InBrief
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bullet Hello!
bullet Intothediploma
bullet Intocounselling
bullet Intoqualifications
bullet Intobookstore
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bullet Intodevelopment
bullet Intoconnection
bullet Intotwitter
bullet Intoquotes
bullet Intoseminars
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Editor: Sandra Poletto
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Copyright: 2012 Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors

Hello!
Welcome to Edition 144 of Institute Inbrief. This edition’s featured article is the first of a 2-part series on how to deal with infidelity in your relationship. The series defines infidelity, explores the emotional reactions behind the experience, and looks at strategies to cope and make decisions for the future. If you know anyone who has experienced infidelity in their relationship, please feel free to forward the information to them.
 
Also in this edition:
 
-      Previously Published Articles
-      Professional Development news
-      Blog and Twitter updates
-      Upcoming seminar dates
 
If you would like to access daily articles & resources, and interact with over 3850 peers, make sure you join our Facebook community today: www.facebook.com/counsellors. It is a great way to stay in touch and share your knowledge in counselling.
 
Enjoy your reading,
 
Editor.
 
 
Join our community:
 
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Intothediploma
 
AIPC is Determined to Make Counselling an Attainable Career for You,
Just Like Over 55,000 Other Students in the Past 20 Years!
 
We have helped over 55,000 people from 27 countries pursue their dream of assisting others with a recognised Counselling qualification.
 
It's been a wonderful journey over the last 20 years (the Institute was first established in 1990). And it's been a pleasure to assist so many people realise their counselling aspirations in that time.
 
Why are so many people delighted with their studies? Our research over the years highlights three keys points...
 
1.     Our courses and personnel have just ONE specific focus... Excellence in Counselling Education. We live and breathe counselling education! Nothing else gets in the way.
 
2.     Exceptional value in your education investment. Our courses are always (always) much less than other providers that deliver counselling education. Our unique focus on counselling education, the large number of students undertaking our programs, and the creative way we deliver our courses provide us with cost savings that we pass on to you.
 
3.     The flexibility to study where, when and how you want to. You can study Externally, In-Class, On-Line or any combination. And you can undertake your studies at a pace that suits you... 12 to 18 months or over 2, 3 even 4 years or more. You decide because you are in charge.
 
We understand that no two people have the same circumstances. You no doubt have issues affecting your life that are unique to you and affect the speed and manner you'd like to study. You may be working full or part-time, undertaking other studies, or may not have studied for a long time.
 
Let's face it, life is not predictable and in today's fast paced society it's important that your education is flexible enough to fit in with your other obligations. AIPC provides you with flexible course delivery modes so YOU set the rules for how and when you learn.
 
Want to find out more? Visit www.aipc.net.au/lz today!
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Intocounselling
 
A Guide to Dealing with Infidelity, Part 1
 
In this two-part series, we provide you with a shot guide to deal with infidelity in your relationship. The first article focuses on the definition, types and reasons behind infidelity. We also explore what to do (or not do) when you first discover infidelity in your relationship.
 
Definition
 
What exactly defines infidelity? Most of us believe that infidelity is the act of intercourse occurring with an external person outside a relationship. Interestingly, feelings of hurt and betrayal can be equally intense on discovering that your partner has been having secret regular coffee dates with a work colleague. People Magazine asked readers to define an extra-marital affair, with this result.
 
21% thinking about an involvement
21% dinner and drinks
24% kissing and petting
26% sexual intercourse
8% N/A
 
Whilst the definition of infidelity varies, many people describe the aftermath as worse than losing their partner through death. This is because relationships survive after death, but do not always survive after infidelity. When a partner dies, he or she is remembered fondly and despite sadness and loneliness, love continues through memories and photographs. After infidelity, the relationship becomes unstable, and research shows that one of three things occurs: 
 
-      The affair is ignored and may continue or is repeated but nothing changes in the relationship.
-      The relationship ends.
-      The affair stops. The old relationship discontinues and a new relationship begins.
 
Before we examine what may lie in the future, let’s look at the present. The discovery of an affair can sometimes be catastrophic. Feelings such as denial, anger and betrayal can trigger behaviours such as excessive drinking, eating and smoking which can affect our thought processes, sleeping patterns and general functioning. Take a moment to examine how much support you have. The following is a short exercise which can help to identify the areas where support is or is not evident. 
 
Social Support Network Checklist
 
Which of the following types of support do you have available? Pay particular attention to the people who give you emotional and esteem support and utilise these friends when needed. Be careful not to be around those who trigger negative reactions. Notice areas where support is missing and make a mental note to fill these areas. It is extremely important to be able to identify if your level of functioning has deteriorated dramatically and if so, professional help must be sought. 
 
Network support: belonging to a group, recreation, social activities, church group, etc.
Informational support: offering advice or guidance e.g. Child Health Nurse, Doctor, Counsellor.
Emotional support: Can ring or visit for a talk when stressed.
Physical support: When you need to move house or get to the doctor quickly.
Emergency support: Can use 24 hours a day without fear of inconvenience.
Negative interactions: People who can trigger anger and frustration.
Esteem support: Those people who boost your confidence.
 
Other Losses
 
Whether the relationship ends or not, some serious losses are felt. Losses can be physical or symbolic and may include:
 
-      Loss of trust
-      Loss of security
-      Loss of hope/dreams
-      Loss of faith
-      Loss of intimacy and affection
-      Loss of self esteem
 
The obvious loss is that of trust in the other partner. Trust is crucial to all relationships and is usually earned. Whether one is able to trust his/her partner after the discovery of an affair is dependent on many things including one’s individual values, his/her ability to forgive and whether the person who had the affair is willing to re-earn that trust. 
 
Loss of security for many can be twofold. A sense of security can mean feeling safe and comfortable in the knowledge that all is good around them. It can also mean for some, that the discovery of an affair may result in the relationship breaking down which in turn means division of property and changes in lifestyle.
 
An affair can damage or destroy one’s hopes and dreams, particularly if trust cannot be restored and the relationship ends. Many people have dreams such as raising their children in an “intact” family, owning their home, or travelling together in their twilight years. Losing hopes and dreams can be devastating until such hopes and dreams can be replaced with others.
 
Many people like to “blame” someone or something for an affair, and quite often people lose their faith either temporarily or permanently. Statements like “why would God do this to me?” or “life just isn’t worth living” are indicative of someone who has lost either their spiritual faith or their faith in life.
 
The loss of intimacy and affection leads to loneliness which can lead to poor or hasty decisions in subsequent partnerships. Whilst some relationships may have noticed the absence of intimacy and affection many months prior to the discovery of the affair, many relationships manage to retain their closeness, and the affair shocks the discoverer who is placed in turmoil. All of a sudden they are eating, sleeping and talking with no one. 
 
Probably the most common loss suffered after the discovery of an affair, is the loss of self-esteem. This sometimes occurs when the blame is self-directed with statements such as “maybe if I had looked after myself better” and “if only I had paid more attention to her instead of my work”. Some also take the view that their partner “chose” someone else over and above them because of the way they look, act, work which assists poor self-esteem. 
 
Feelings
 
Feeling a loss is very individual and the above losses are examples only. Because loss is so individual, the list may be exhaustive. Now, examine for a moment what losses you feel. It is useful to take the time to identify and acknowledge these losses in order to understand your emotions and fears.  
 
Exercise: List your losses in relation to the infidelity in your relationship, and beside each loss, try to attach a “feeling” to each one. An example is provided on the top line. Feel free to use examples from above, or identify new losses, individual to you. Now that you have started to reflect on what you are feeling, it is time to understand that all these feelings are normal, and neither right or wrong. 
 
Denying your feelings is more harmful than getting to know your feelings. If your feelings are overwhelming and you are having physical reactions when reminded of the infidelity, it might be best to consult a professional as a priority.
 
Do’s and Don’ts
 
So far we have identified your support networks, the various losses associated with the infidelity and the various feelings which are individual to you at this time. Don’t expect these feelings to disappear overnight. Below are some do’s and don’ts that you might like to consider:
 
DON’T make any major decisions right now. This is not the time to end your relationship or sell the family home. It could however, be a good time to reflect on your relationship and see what issues brought you both to this. These issues could possibly be dealt with in counselling and assist with a brighter more rewarding relationship in the long run.
 
DO look after yourself. You may be experiencing some physical reactions as a result of the infidelity such as sleep problems, losing weight or lack of concentration. Pay attention to these reactions and visit your GP if they persist.
 
DO experience emotions. Recognise that each day will be different and so will your moods. Enjoy laughter when it comes and surround yourself with people you enjoy and who make you laugh. It’s OK to cry too. Sometimes people hold their emotions inside, thinking it wrong to show them outwardly. If tears don’t come naturally, try encouraging them with family photo albums and favourite songs.
 
DO speak with your partner about the infidelity. You have a right to the information you need in order to make decisions, but recognise that knowledge and details may not be useful. Understand that your partner may not always have the answers or reasons for the infidelity occurring in the first place.
 
DO start writing a journal of your feelings and emotions. Writing is one of the most common therapeutic tools used because it helps to get rid of unwanted bitterness and resentment.
 
DO tell your children that you will be okay. DON’T weigh them down with details and DON’T discredit your partner to the children. At the end of the day, you want your children to know and love both parents, despite mistakes and misdemeanours.
 
DON’T play the blaming game over who caused the infidelity. It is just wasted energy and won’t change anything. In most cases there are two sides to every story and it takes two people to fall in and out of love. This includes blaming of the other partner, the third party, and yourself.
 
DO think twice before telling others. Some people, including family members can be unforgiving and may hold grudges for a long time, long after you do.
 
DON’T try to get through this time alone. Surround yourself with positive people and seek the support of a counsellor if required.
 
DON’T get into a retaliatory affair or relationship too quickly. Recognise your vulnerabilities and safeguard your emotions.
 
But Why?
 
There is no simple answer to why someone becomes unfaithful. It could be a symptom of other problems in the relationship or it could relate to something in your partner’s past. You may never truly know why it happened. Some believe that in order to reduce anxiety in relationships, we focus on a third party to whom we unconsciously pull into the situation. This is called “triangular relationships” which serve to keep the issues evident in the marital or original relationship, underground. Usually there are three forces that can play a part. These are the forces within an individual that pull them toward affairs, the forces within an individual that push them toward affairs, and lastly societal factors. We will go through these individually.
 
Forces which pull people toward affairs include attraction to others for reasons of power, admiration, companionship and sexual attraction. Excitement, risk, curiosity and falling in love are other forces that can be described as pull forces.
Forces within the individual which push them toward affairs include having a desire to escape or fill the gaps in a relationship, boredom or the need for punishment. Having the need to prove one’s attractiveness or self-worth, or a desire for attention are other push forces.
 
Societal factors include movies, TV shows and romantic novels which tell the tale of glamorous love affairs. The general public is fascinated with headline news stories of public figures that have had affairs. Promotional marketing campaigns parade attractive, near naked models because “sex sells”.
 
The bottom line is that there is probably no ONE single reason for a person having an affair. There are usually many reasons including pull and push forces together with the influence of societal factors. 
 
Types of Affairs
 
Knowing the type of infidelity sometimes makes understanding it a little easier. Was it a one night stand or a long term affair? Was it due to mid-life crisis or an act of retaliation? Is there a sexual addiction or did he/she want the marriage to end?
 
There are several types of affairs which include:
 
The curiosity affair – where one is bored and curious about the excitement of having an external relationship.
 
The unintended affair – a simultaneous attraction occurs in an environment outside the relationship
 
The compulsive affair – often initiated by one with a risk taking and adventurous personality
 
The retaliative affair – is motivated by revenge and serves the purpose of equalising the wrongs. But do two wrongs equal a right?
 
The split self-affair – this happens when the needs of others are put before those of oneself, and the deprivation catches up. Usually a long term affair because decisions are avoided.
 
The distance regulator – the relationship is usually over but tolerated for reasons which may include the children and security.
 
Out the door affair – an “excuse” for leaving the relationship. This occurs when the relationship is over for the betrayer but wants a quick way out. Often clues are left for a quick discovery.
 
Empty nest affairs – where couples have lived their lives around the children and have found that the empty nest is too empty and lonely. 
 
Sexual addiction – when the couple’s sexual drive is not equalised and the betrayer goes in search of sexual satisfaction outside the relationship.
 
Intimacy avoiders - being intimate with someone outside the relationship helps retain distance from your partner. It is usually a means to staying absent.
 
Conflict avoidance – an affair to control and diffuse anger, and avoid arguments and difference of opinion.
 
Who Has Affairs?
 
How many times have you heard people say “it will never happen to us”. Maybe you have even said it yourself. It is widely thought that affairs only occur in bad or unhealthy relationships, but that too is a myth. Sadly, no one is immune to infidelity.   Monogamous relationships are what most people say they believe in and look for partners with the same beliefs and values. But having these beliefs and values does not prevent large numbers of people from having extramarital affairs, because many people don’t intend to have the affair in the first place.
 
Research has shown that affairs happen:
 
-      in both healthy and unhealthy relationships
-      more so in couples who had brief courtships
-      more so in ages 20’s and 40’s
-      when one or both partners work long hours
-      with co-workers in the workplace
-      with a friend or family member
 
It therefore appears that even the most unlikely couple is not immune from infidelity occurring in their relationship and the subsequent disruption to their lives and the lives of those they care about. Affairs happen to all kinds of people, in all walks of life.
 
How Common Are Affairs?
 
Conservative estimates are that 60 percent of men and 40 percent of women will have an extramarital affair. Taking into account that affairs happen not only in marital relationships but “committed” relationships as well, there is compelling evidence that the incidence of infidelity is increasing.
 
Understanding the prevalence of affairs within our society helps gives us a more realistic perspective when trying to understand why our partner has strayed. Having an understanding of just how many others are in or have been in the same situation can sometimes alleviate feelings of isolation or failure.
 
The next edition explores the consequences of infidelity. We also look at stages of grief experienced by “victims” of infidelity and analyse options to make a decision about your relationship’s future.  
 
Did you enjoy this article? Then share the feeling and forward it to a friend! Quick reminder: Please send this eZine to all your family and friends so they too can enjoy the benefits. Thank you.
 
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Intoqualifications
 
Learn How You Can Gain Specialty Expertise and a Graduate Qualification with a Vocational Graduate Certificate or Vocational Graduate Diploma in Counselling...
 
...In Only 6 to 12 Months
 
More and more Counsellors are gaining advanced specialist skills with a Vocational Graduate qualification. Vocational Graduate qualifications provide a higher level, vocational alternative to traditional Post Graduate courses offered by Universities.
 
It's time and cost effective, meaning you can gain a formal graduate qualification in 6 to 12 months in your specialist area. Here's how a graduate qualification can advance your career:
 
-      Develop a deeper understanding of your area of interest and achieve more optimal outcomes with your clients.
-      A graduate qualification will assist you move up the corporate ladder from practitioner to manager/ supervisor.
-      Make the shift from being a generalist practitioner to a specialist.
-      Gain greater professional recognition from your peers.
-      Increase client referrals from allied health professionals.
-      Maximise job opportunities in your preferred specialty area.
-      Formalise years of specialist experience with a respected qualification.
 
Save Over $6,000 (67% Discount to Market)
 
A Vocational Graduate Diploma at a university costs between $10,000 and $38,000. BUT, you don’t have to pay these exorbitant amounts for an equally high quality qualification. You can do your qualification with the Institute and save a massive $6,000+ on the cost of doing a similar course at university.
 
To learn more, please visit www.aipc.net.au/vgd. Alternatively, call your nearest Institute branch on the FreeCall numbers shown below.
 
Sydney: 1800 677 697
Melbourne: 1800 622 489
Perth: 1800 246 381
Brisbane: 1800 353 643
Adelaide: 1800 246 324
Regional NSW: 1800 625 329
Regional QLD: 1800 359 565
Gold Coast: 1800 625 359
NT/Tasmania: 1800 353 643
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Intobookstore
The Institute has a list of recommended textbooks and DVDs which can add great value to your learning journey - and the good news is that you can purchase them very easily. The AIPC bookstore will give YOU:
 
-      Discounted prices!
-      Easy ordering method!
-      Quality guarantee!
 
This fortnight's feature is...
 
Name: Family Therapy: Concepts and Methods, 9th edition
Author: Nichols, Michael
AIPC Code: NICHOLS
AIPC Price: $100.60 (RRP $111.80)
ISBN: 978-020-576-8936
 
Real-life case material and a comprehensive look at all major schools and developments in family therapy make this the text of choice for family therapy courses across the country.
 
To order this book, simply contact your nearest Student Support Centre or the AIPC Head Office (1800 657 667).
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Intoarticles
 
A Case for Solutions When Working with the Elderly
 
The minute she arrived and displayed her beautifully lined and full of expression face on my eyes there was a bond. Immediately I had to check myself. This person in front of me is not my mother. She is the same age as my mother was when she died five years previously, she has the same coloured hair, permed and styled exactly the same; she is the same height and even has the same smile. An overwhelming feeling of love for my own mother swept over me; I missed her so much.
 
As I allowed Beryl Mackenzie to tell her story I challenged myself to keep track of my own feelings, no transference please. On the surface I knew that this poor lady of 86 years needed to tell her story to somebody who will attempt to appreciate her feelings. Somebody who will share an unconditional positive regard and project a deep empathic understanding. Unfortunately Beryl picked up on the subconscious feeling I was projecting and there in my room was a case of countertransference. 
 
Click here to continue reading this article...
 
 
Coping with the Death of a Loved One
 
Losing someone you love can be like losing one half of yourself. The pain and emptiness felt during the grieving process can go on for months or years, however no two people will ever respond to the same situation in the same way. Working through grief is a day by day, week by week process. You may have bad days when you think you will never recover from this loss. You may also think that you will never function successfully without this person in your life. The good news is that you will recover and you will be fully functional, if you choose to.
 
Each and every one of us changes in some way after the death of someone we love.   Some of us may harden after the experience; some will soften, but those who choose to learn and grow from this tragic time, will go on with their life remembering ‘what was’ and appreciating ‘what is’. Learning about grief is helpful to the grieving process. In this article, we will explore the common reactions of those experiencing a loss, together with looking at strategies for coping, assisting others who are grieving and facing the future.
 
Click here to continue reading this article...
 
Other articles: www.aipc.net.au/articles
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Intodevelopment
 
Convenient Professional Development
 
Hundreds of counsellors, psychologists, social workers, mental health nurses and allied health professionals already access over 100 Hours of Professional Development online, for less than $1 a day. Now it's your turn.
 
Mental Health Academy (MHA) is the leading provider of professional development education for the mental health industry. MHA provides the largest variety of courses and videos workshops, all conveniently delivered via the internet.
 
With MHA, you no longer have to worry about high costs, proximity and availability, or fitting a workshop around your lifestyle!
 
You can access the huge range of PD, including courses and video workshops, whenever and from wherever you want.
 
Whether you are looking for courses on anxiety and depression, or a video workshop discussing the intricacies of relationship counselling - Mental Health Academy is your gateway to over 100 hours of professional development content.
 
Take a quick look at what Mental Health Academy offers:
 
-      Over 70 professionally developed courses.
-      On-demand, webstreamed video workshops.
-      Over 100 hours of professional development.
-      Extremely relevant topics.
-      New courses released every month.
-      Video supported training.
-      Online, 24/7 access to resources.
-      Endorsement by multiple Associations, including AASW, ACA and APS.
 
Begin your journey today. Click on the link below to register for a monthly or annual unlimited membership. As an unlimited member, you can access all MHA courses for less than $1 per day, and receive discounts when purchasing any video workshops:
 
 
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Intoconnection
Have you visited Counselling Connection, the Institute's Blog yet? We continually publish new and interesting posts including case studies, profiles, success stories and much more. Make sure you too get connected (and thank you for those who have already submitted comments and suggestions).
 
Book Review - Back from the Edge
 
Rob Hewitt was drawn from the water after 75 hours at sea. His skin had begun to separate from his body, his mind was barely holding on – but he survived. People said it was like a miracle. How did he do it, how did he cope? In her book “Back from the Edge,” Psychosynthesis oriented psychotherapist Meg Carbonatto asks this question, both of Rob Hewitt and also fourteen other extraordinary New Zealanders and Australians whose resilience in the face of serious adversity both inspires and instructs.
 
Her subjects are a diverse bunch of modern day heroes who each in their own way reveals an alchemy by which the slings and arrows of life are transformed. These people have been, or are, faced with serious challenges. Along with Hewitt there is a young Afghan refugee from the Tampa; an Aboriginal member of the “stolen generation”; a woman recovering from the death of her child, the end of her marriage, and cancer; a man dealing with the aftermath of a motorcar accident in which three people die; and a man facing impending death from prostate cancer. Carbonatto devotes a chapter to each.
 
Click here to continue reading this post...
 
Blog Email: blog@aipc.net.au
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Intotwitter
Follow us on Twitter and get the latest and greatest in counselling news. To follow, visit https://twitter.com/counsellingnews and click "Follow".
 
Featured Tweets
 
Bullying may contribute to lower test scores https://ow.ly/1e8HKr
 
CBT with Substance Dependence: https://t.co/5gt1EOg
 
Small interventions can alleviate underperformance caused by stereotype threat https://ow.ly/1e6yJt
 
Interesting stuff - Eye-catching psychological studies that didn't make the final cut: https://t.co/E2Jd2nP
 
Girls Are So Complicated! Re-Imagining Addiction Support in Context (PDF): https://t.co/Vw7Unid
 
Julian Treasure: 5 ways to listen better: on.ted.com/9W
 
Excellent free downloads from the Domestic Violence Resource Centre Victoria: https://t.co/iXQMHaJ
 
Note that you need a Twitter profile to follow a list. If you do not have one yet, visit https://twitter.com to create a free profile today!
 
Tweet Count: 2698
Follower Count: 3230
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Intoquotes
"When you hold resentment toward another, you are bound to that person or condition by an emotional link that is stronger than steel. Forgiveness is the only way to dissolve that link and get free." 
 
~ Catherine Ponder
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Intoseminars
Many students of the Diploma of Counselling attend seminars to complete the practical requirements of their course. Seminars provide an ideal opportunity to network with other students and liaise with qualified counselling professionals in conjunction with completing compulsory coursework.
 
Below are upcoming seminars dates in 2011. To register for a seminar, please contact your Student Support Centre.
 
To access the full list, visit: www.aipc.net.au/timetables.php.
 
Diploma of Counselling (CDA) Timetable
 
Northern Territory
The Counselling Process - 24/09, 04/12
Communication Skills I - 12/11
Communication Skills II - 20/08, 03/12
Counselling Therapies II - 27-28/08
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 05/11
Family Therapy - 17/09
Case Management - 26-27/11
 
South Australia
The Counselling Process - 24/09, 26/11
Communication Skills I - 15/10, 03/12
Communication Skills II - 16/10, 04/12
Counselling Therapies I - 13-14/08, 12-13/11
Counselling Therapies II - 27-28/08, 10-11/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks- 17/09
Family Therapy - 27/11
Case Management - 19-20/11
 
Sydney
The Counselling Process - 26/08, 10/09, 14/10, 31/10, 26/11, 12/12
Communication Skills I - 27/08, 24/09, 21/10, 18/11, 14/12
Communication Skills II - 02/09, 07/10, 30/11
Counselling Therapies I - 22-23/08, 27-28/10, 01-02/12
Counselling Therapies II - 19-20/09, 14-15/11
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 30/09, 21/11
Family Therapy - 13/10, 13/12
Case Management - 22-23/09, 24-25/11
 
Western Australia
The Counselling Process - 13/08, 10/09, 08/10, 05/11, 03/12
Communication Skills I - 17/09, 29/10, 10/12
Communication Skills II - 18/09, 30/10, 11/12
Counselling Therapies I - 03-04/09, 26-27/11
Counselling Therapies II - 24-25/09, 17-18/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 09/10
Family Therapy - 14/08, 04/12
Case Management - 27-28/08, 12-13/11
 
Brisbane
The Counselling Process - 24/09, 27/11
Communication Skills I - 22/10, 03/12
Communication Skills II - 03/09, 05/11
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/09
Counselling Therapies II - 29-30/10
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 27/08, 19/11
Family Therapy - 10/09, 17/12
Case Management - 12-13/11
 
Tasmania
The Counselling Process - 21/08, 27/11
Communication Skills I - 25/09, 18/12
Communication Skills II - 06/11
Counselling Therapies I - 19-20/11
Counselling Therapies II - 03-04/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 04/09, 11/12
Family Therapy - 16/10
Case Management - 13-14/08, 12-13/11
 
Melbourne
The Counselling Process - 05/08, 24/09, 29/10, 19/11, 16/12
Communication Skills I - 20/08, 10/09, 29/10, 12/11, 03/12
Communication Skills II - 21/08, 11/09, 30/10, 13/11, 20/11, 04/12
Counselling Therapies I - 27-28/08, 17-18/09, 15-16/10, 26-27/11, 10-11/12
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/08, 24-25/09, 22-23/10, 19-20/11, 17-18/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 13/08, 08/10
Family Therapy - 14/08, 09/10
Case Management - 03-04/09, 05-06/11
 
Sunshine Coast
The Counselling Process - 17/09
Communication Skills I - 13/08, 29/10
Communication Skills II - 14/08, 30/10
Counselling Therapies II - 24-25/09
Family Therapy - 20/08
Case Management - 05-06/11
 
Gold Coast
The Counselling Process - 22/10, 03/12
Communication Skills I - 20/08, 05/11
Communication Skills II - 17/09, 17/12
Counselling Therapies I - 23-24/09
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/11
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 21/10
Case Management - 14-15/10
 
Diploma of Professional Counselling (DPCD) Timetable
 
Northern Territory
Communication Skills I - 12/11
Communication Skills II - 20/08, 03/12
The Counselling Process - 24/09, 04/12
Counselling Therapies I - 19-20/11
Counselling Therapies II - 10-11/12
Case Management - 26-27/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 08/10
Counselling Applications - 29/10
 
South Australia
Communication Skills I - 15/10, 03/12
Communication Skills II - 16/10, 04/12
The Counselling Process - 24/09, 26/11
Counselling Therapies I - 13-14/08, 12-13/11
Counselling Therapies II - 27-28/08, 10-11/12
Case Management - 29-20/11
Counselling Applications - 25/09
 
Sydney
Communication Skills I - 27/08, 24/09, 21/10, 18/11, 14/12
Communication Skills II - 02/09, 07/10, 30/11
The Counselling Process - 26/08, 10/09, 14/10, 31/10, 26/11, 12/12
Counselling Therapies I - 22-23/08, 27-28/10, 01-02/12
Counselling Therapies II - 27-28/07, 19-20/09, 14-15/11
Case Management - 22-23/09, 24-25/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 16/09, 05/12
Counselling Applications - 17/10, 09/12
 
Western Australia
Communication Skills I - 17/09, 29/10, 10/12
Communication Skills II - 18/09, 30/10, 11/12
The Counselling Process - 13/08, 10/09, 08/10, 05/11, 03/12
Counselling Therapies I - 03-04/09, 26-27/11
Counselling Therapies II - 24-25/09, 17-18/12
Case Management - 27-28/08, 12-13/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 11/09
Counselling Applications - 06/11
 
Brisbane
Communication Skills I - 22/10, 03/12
Communication Skills II - 03/09, 05/11
The Counselling Process - 24/09, 27/11
Counselling Therapies I - 10-11/12
Case Management - 12-13/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 15/10
Counselling Applications - 13/08, 18/12
 
Tasmania
Communication Skills I - 25/09, 18/12
Communication Skills II - 06/11
The Counselling Process - 21/08, 27/11
Counselling Therapies II - 27-28/08
Case Management - 13-14/08, 12-13/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 23/10
Counselling Applications - 30/10
 
Melbourne
Communication Skills I - 20/08, 10/09, 29/10, 12/11, 03/12
Communication Skills II - 21/08, 11/09, 30/10, 13/11, 20/11, 04/12
The Counselling Process - 05/08, 24/09, 29/10, 19/11, 19/12, 16/12
Counselling Therapies I - 27-28/08, 17-18/09, 15-16/10, 26-27/11, 10-11/12
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/08, 24-25/09, 22-23/10, 19-20/11, 17-18/12
Case Management - 03-04/09, 05-06/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 01/10
Counselling Applications - 02/10
 
Sunshine Coast
Communication Skills I - 13/08, 29/10
Communication Skills II - 14/08, 30/10
The Counselling Process - 17/09
Counselling Therapies II - 24-25/09
Case Management - 05-06/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 27/08
Counselling Applications - 22/10
 
Gold Coast
 
Communication Skills I - 20/08, 05/11
Communication Skills II - 17/09, 17/12
The Counselling Process - 22/10, 03/12
Counselling Therapies I - 23-24/09
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/11
Case Management - 14-15/10
 
Important Note: Advertising of the dates above does not guarantee availability of places in the seminar. Please check availability with the respective Student Support Centre.
 
 
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