In this Issue

Hello!
Intothediploma
Intoeducation
Intonews
IntoMHSS
Intocounselling
Intobookstore
Intoarticles
Intodevelopment
Intoconnection
Intotwitter
Intoquotes
Intoseminars

Contact us

Publications

Editor: Sandra Poletto
Email: ezine@aipc.net.au
Website: www.aipc.net.au

AIPC appreciates your feedback. Please email ezine@aipc.net.au with any comments, suggestions or editorial input for future editions of Institute Inbrief.

Support Centres

Brisbane 1800 353 643
Sydney 1800 677 697
Melbourne 1800 622 489
Adelaide 1800 246 324
Sunshine Coast 1800 359 565
Port Macquarie 1800 625 329

Singapore 800 1301 333
New Zealand 0011 64 9919 4500

Join us…

If you are not already on the mailing list for Institute Inbrief, please subscribe here.

No part of this publication may be reproduced without permission. Opinions of contributors and advertisers are not necessarily those of the publisher. The publisher makes no representation or warranty that information contained in articles or advertisements is accurate, nor accepts liability or responsibility for any action arising out of information contained in this e-newsletter.

Copyright: 2012 Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors

Hello!
Welcome to Edition 157 of Institute Inbrief. Social scientists claim that at least 80 per cent of our communication takes place on the non-verbal level (Young, 2005), with only 7 percent of emotion being conveyed by verbal means. As such, researchers have come to appreciate non-verbal behaviours as important channels of communication.
 
This edition’s featured article explores fundamental micro-skills of non-verbal language that can be used to emotionally and psychologically support a client, friend or loved one.
 
Also in this edition:
  • News and Events
  • Training opportunities
  • Previously Published Articles
  • Professional Development news
  • Blog and Twitter updates
  • Upcoming seminar dates
If you would like to access daily articles & resources, and interact with over 4600 peers, make sure you join our Facebook community today: www.facebook.com/counsellors. It is a great way to stay in touch and share your interest and knowledge in counselling.
 
Enjoy your reading,
 
 
Editor
 
 
Join our community:
 
 
Help those around you suffering mental illness in silence: www.mhss.net.au/lz 
 
Intothediploma
 
AIPC provides you with Flexible Course Delivery Modes
So YOU set the rules for how and when you learn...
 
AIPC’s accredited and nationally recognised Diploma of Counselling is designed so that you determine the manner and pace you study. You study entirely at your own pace (except of course if you’re receiving a government benefit such as Austudy) and you can start at any time, graduating in only 18-months.
 
Not only can you set the pace you study, you also determine the mode you want to study. You can study Externally (at home with phone and email access to our counselling tutors), In-Class, Online or any combination… all the time fully supported by our huge national team throughout our 8 Student Support Centres.
 
External learning means you can complete your entire course from the comfort of your home (or office, or overseas, or virtually anywhere!). Your course comes complete with fully self-contained, referenced and professionally presented learning materials including 18 individual workbooks and readings. It really is as simple as working through the material and contacting us for support along the way. If you live locally to one of our support centres you can also attend tutorials to provide you with face to face contact if you wish. (This option is ideal if you enjoy working more independently or have a busy schedule).
 
In-Class learning is a classroom forum where you learn with other students from a qualified lecturer. Classes are available in most main cities, at flexible times. In-Class is a great way for you to accelerate your learning, interact with other students and stay highly motivated. (This option is particularly suitable if you enjoy learning in the classroom environment with other students).
 
Online learning allows you to complete your learning entirely via your PC. You still receive all the high quality hardcopy resources (so you don’t miss out on anything!), but you’ll access all your learning materials and complete assessments online.
 
Any Combination. Of course you don’t have to stick with one learning method throughout your studies. You’re welcome to use whichever method suits your needs and desires at the time. You may choose to complete one workbook In-Class, another Online, then Externally. Whatever is most convenient!
 
Learn more - visit www.aipc.net.au/lz today!
 
Watch inspirational stories from some of our Graduates: www.aipc.net.au/gradvideo
 
Hear what Employers have to say about AIPC Graduates: www.aipc.net.au/employervids
 
Intoeducation
 
Learn How You Can Gain Specialty Expertise and a Graduate Qualification with a Vocational Graduate Certificate or Vocational Graduate Diploma in Counselling...
 
...In Only 6 to 12 Months
 
More and more Counsellors are gaining advanced specialist skills with a Vocational Graduate qualification. Vocational Graduate qualifications provide a higher level, vocational alternative to traditional Post Graduate courses offered by Universities.
 
It's time and cost effective, meaning you can gain a formal graduate qualification in 6 to 12 months in your specialist area. Here's how a graduate qualification can advance your career:
  • Develop a deeper understanding of your area of interest and achieve more optimal outcomes with your clients.
  • A graduate qualification will assist you move up the corporate ladder from practitioner to manager/ supervisor.
  • Make the shift from being a generalist practitioner to a specialist.
  • Gain greater professional recognition from your peers.
  • Increase client referrals from allied health professionals.
  • Maximise job opportunities in your preferred specialty area.
  • Formalise years of specialist experience with a respected qualification.
Save Over $6,000 (67% Discount to Market)
 
A Vocational Graduate Diploma at a university costs between $10,000 and $38,000. BUT, you don’t have to pay these exorbitant amounts for an equally high quality qualification. You can do your qualification with the Institute and save a massive $6,000+ on the cost of doing a similar course at university.
 
To learn more, please visit www.aipc.net.au/vgd. Alternatively, call your nearest Institute branch on the FreeCall numbers shown below.
 
Sydney: 1800 677 697
Melbourne: 1800 622 489
Perth: 1800 246 381
Brisbane: 1800 353 643
Adelaide: 1800 246 324
Regional NSW: 1800 625 329
Regional QLD: 1800 359 565
Gold Coast: 1800 625 359
NT/Tasmania: 1800 353 643
 
Intonews
 
Event – Become MHSS Certified
 
Were you aware that:
  • 45% of adult Australians will experience a mental illness.
  • 1 in 5 will experience a mental disorder in any 12-month period.
  • Mental illness is the leading cause of ‘healthy life’ lost.
  • 3 million Australians will experience a major depressive illness.
And our young are most at risk:
  • An astounding 26% of 16-24 year olds have experienced a mental disorder in the last 12-months.
  • Mental disorders are the leading contributor to the total burden of disease among young Australians – accounting for 49% of that total.
  • And 12% of 13-17 year olds have reported having thought about suicide.
The statistics really are frightening. And our mental health system can not cope. Mental illness is the third largest contributor to the total national health burden (13.2%), yet only receives a measly 6% of the health expenditure. And the majority of that expenditure is on clinical service provision, not early intervention – it’s a band aid solution, provided way too late.
 
That’s why we’re on a mission to stop the decline of mental health in Australia. The starting point is getting Mental Health Social Support certified.
 
To incentivise you to get your MHSS certification, on Thursday 29th and Friday 30th March 2012 we are halving the price of our MHSS course.
 
To find out more information, join our Facebook Event Page and RSVP your attendance!
 
 
PS This event is open to anyone. So please share the link with your friends on Facebook and Twitter, and help us on our mission to improve mental health support in our communities.
 
 
Event – Fund Raising Quiz/Auction Night (Adelaide)
 
Carol Moore (Manager – AIPC Adelaide) is hosting a FUND RAISING QUIZ/AUCTION NIGHT on FRIDAY 20th April 2012. If you are based in Adelaide and surrounding areas, we would love you to attend. Bring your friends/family – have your own table of 10 or make up several tables and have your own competition going.
 
Proceedings from this event will be donated to two charities:
  • BACA – Bikers Against Child Abuse. Carol is involved with and works to raise funds for BACA. Funds are used to support children victims of abuse.
  • CCAF – Cure Cancer Australia Foundation. Simon Clarke (AIPC’s Director) will be climbing Mt Kilimanjaro, the 4th highest mountain in the world, to help raise money for cancer research. The climb involves trekking/climbing (while carrying a daypack weighing up to 8kgs) through remote areas at altitudes up to 6,000m (if you can’t attend this event but would like to donate funds for cancer research, visit Simon’s Climb for a Cure webpage).
IN ADDITION TO THE FUN OF THE QUIZ NIGHT... there will be raffles and lots of Items up for Auction so bring your cash with you to participate in all the fun.
 
Event Details:
 
WHEN: FRIDAY 20th APRIL 2012
WHERE: EUROPEAN CATERING CENTRE (Port Adelaide side of the Entertainment Centre just off Port Road), 2B Chief Street HINDMARSH SA
TIME: 7:00 pm till late (Quiz starts at 8pm sharp so don’t be late)
 
Bar Facilities Available for drinks (BYO not permitted) **you may bring a basket supper if you like.
 
PRE-PURCHASE TICKETS so you don’t miss out on a table as numbers will be limited.
 
Tickets: $5.00ea (includes a ticket for the door prize)
 
Pre-purchase Tickets are available from CAZ n STRECH (0419 866 753) or at the venue on the first Thursday night of the month 6:00-8.30pm (Ulysses meeting night) or at the door if there are spaces left. PLEASE HELP CAROL SUPPORT these charities – come have some fun.
 
IntoMHSS
Mental Health Social Support (MHSS) skills are possibly the most crucial life skill you can have.
 
Would you know:
  • If a friend, family member or colleague had suicidal thoughts?
  • How to assist someone having a panic attack?
  • How to help someone with an addiction?
  • How to help someone with depression?
MHSS skills will teach you to help identify and assist those with a developing mental health issue. It’s a crucial life skill that takes just a weekend of your time – and may save the life of your child, a friend or colleague.
 
In this 2-day workshop you’ll learn:
  • Fundamentals of mental health.
  • How to identify the signs and symptoms of mental health problems.
  • How to help people in the early stages of mental health problems.
  • Introduce you to common mental illnesses such as anxiety disorders, depression, substance abuse disorders, psychotic disorders (schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, etc) and more.
  • Improve your knowledge, understanding and language of mental health.
  • Know where and how to get help.
  • Understand what types of help are effective – and which aren’t.
  • Reduce the stigma associated with mental illness.
  • Plus much more.
Numbers are strictly capped to maximise your learning experience, so please book early.
 
Click here to search for upcoming MHSS 2-day Workshops by State.
 
If you prefer to undertake your training entirely online, visit www.mhss.net.au/lz to learn more and register for the MHSS eCourse.
 
Intocounselling
 
The Micro-skills of Non-verbal Language
 
The American National Science Foundation discovered that we form an impression of someone in just three seconds (personal communication, 1984). Social scientists also claim that at least 80 per cent of our communication takes place on the non-verbal level (Young, 2005), with only 7 percent of emotion being conveyed by verbal means. Of the rest, 38 per cent is conveyed by voice, and 55 per cent by facial expression (Mehrabian, 1972). Beyond that, researchers have come to appreciate non-verbal behaviours as important channels of communication, serving the functions of:
  • Regulating conversations
  • Communicating emotions
  • Modifying verbal messages
  • Providing messages about the helping relationship
  • Giving insights into self-perceptions
  • Providing clues that people are not saying what they are thinking (Highlen and Hill, 1984).
When sitting with a helpee (this could be a client or a friend you are providing emotional support), you have multiple channels of non-verbal communication at your disposal.
 
Eye contact. The most important indicator that someone is listening, eye contact is a powerful communication tool. Making eye contact with the helpee conveys the helper’s confidence and involvement, and can be used to communicate caring and comfort. It needs to be used with caution, however, as there is wide variance between cultures as to the meaning of eye contact. Western cultures associate lack of eye contact with dishonesty, indifference, or shame, and also – in academic circles –  a lack of respect.
 
Conversely, in some cultures eye contact means the opposite. Navajo students at the University of New Mexico, for example, look down rather than looking the professor in the eye in order to convey humility and respect. If you do not look at helpees, they may think that you are not interested. If you stare fixedly, they may become uncomfortable, or perceive either seduction or aggression. In general, a moderate amount of eye contact, along with closely observing helpees to notice the effect on them, is recommended. When you really want to be heard by your helpee, eye contact will make your message more potent (Young, 2005).
 
Posture/Body position. Posture may be the most frequently noticed aspect of “body language”. The goal is to go for a relaxed body position. This may include leaning slightly forward, as part of your way of communicating involvement and interest. Being relaxed without informally lounging says, “I am comfortable with myself, and I have time to listen to you” (Young, 2005). To be tense would be to shift the focus off your helpee onto yourself, and might also spark tension in the helpee (Egan, 2006).
 
You may also wish to consider “matching” your helpee’s posture. The idea is that, early on, you mirror the way the helpee is sitting (without being unnatural, which would seem gimmicky to the care recipient). Done skilfully, this tends to communicate somewhat more intimacy to the helpee, rather than that you are superior as the helper. If, after a while, you sense that rapport has built up between you, you may slightly shift your position and observe whether the helpee follows you. If they do, it means that rapport has been established, and the helpee will be likely to experience a reduction in tension (Geldard and Geldard, 2005).
 
Facial expressions. Psychologists have distinguished six primary emotions: sadness, joy, anger, surprise, disgust, and fear. These register in our facial expressions regardless of culture (Ekman, 1975). In addition to the basic emotions, we can distinguish many more facial expressions, with estimates reaching 5000 (Blum, 1998). This means that, as a helper, you can gain much information from close observation of your helpee’s expressions. When they do not match what the person is saying, you have detected incongruence, and this tends to be an indicator of lack of self-awareness, conflict, or even deceit (hence the expression that someone acting in a hypocritical manner is “two-faced”).
 
Moreover, the sensitivity human beings have towards facial expression means that, as a helper, your facial expressions – whether you are aware of them or not – will communicate much to a helpee. In the Freudian tradition of helping, it was not deemed appropriate for the helper to have any overt reaction to the client’s emotions. The person-centered therapists, working in the tradition of Carl Rogers, believed that genuine expression was important for congruence. Whether you are in one of these camps theoretically at polar opposites to one another or somewhere in between, it is clear that your face can help the helpee to disclose more, or – if the helpee detects disdain, boredom, or that he is being made fun of – shut the door entirely.
 
Gestures. These physical motions are an element of attending that we use both to convey emotion and to emphasise important points. If our arms flail wildly, we are drumming our fingers, frequently shifting body position, checking the watch, or playing with something, we signal anxiety, impatience, or boredom. Looking like a stone statue, however, may communicate aloofness or lack of interest. Again, as with facial expressions and body position, the recommended approach is that you are moderately reactive, indicating friendliness and warmth. Your gestures should be casual, natural, and not distracting. Occasional head nodding for encouragement may be included (Young, 2005).
 
Tone of voice. The way that you use your voice in a helping encounter encompasses pitch, volume, intensity, inflection, speed of speaking, spacing of words, the type of emphasis, pausation, silence, and fluency. Just as we can tell much about the helpee’s emotional state from their tone of voice, so too does the helpee make assumptions based on hearing the helper’s voice.
 
If the helper conveys empathy and a calm concern with a relaxed, clear voice, the helpee receives the message that, despite the emotional turmoil with which he may have entered the helping session, the helper will not be overwhelmed. There is the sense that the helper has the capacity to stabilise the situation, and the helpee feels more calm and hopeful. You may wish to communicate that you understand the helpee’s feelings. Rather than exactly matching a helpee’s tone of voice (which might be quite agitated), this communication is best done through slight elevation of the voice or emphasis of certain words. The helpee then hears that you were listening to the emotions as well as the facts.
 
Physical distance and touching. Perhaps none of the non-verbal micro-skills are more vulnerable to cultural differences and ambiguous interpretation than physical distance or touching. Proxemics, the study of space utilisation in human interactions, dictates that the closer the distance, the more personal the interaction. Some cultures, such as Latin-based peoples, are comfortable speaking with as little as 4 inches between them, whereas people in Australia and New Zealand require a much larger “bubble” of personal space.
 
The “appropriate” distance in the United States is 90 – 120 cm (between 3 and 4 feet). If you put a desk or table between yourself and the helpee, it increases the feeling of formality, and also the emotional distance between you. On the other hand, if you are squashed with only a very small distance between you, the helpee may feel intimidated and anxious. Most probably, if you are setting up a helping meeting, the chairs should be between 1.6 metres (about 5 feet) and about 450 cm (about 18 inches). You may wish to let helpees arrange the chairs to a distance that suits them.
 
Touching is similarly open to interpretation. Using it during a helping encounter communicates caring and concern, especially when the helpee is dealing with grief. It also is shown to have a positive impact on the helping relationship. Touch can enhance bonding between the helper and depressed helpees, and may be used to emphasise important points. It does seem to increase the ability to influence the touched person (Driscoll, Newman and Seals, 1988; Willison & Masson, 1986).
 
Some counselling experts do not believe that hugs have any place in the helping relationship. Others have the experience that appropriate touch can enhance the session. If you do use it, these three guidelines are helpful to observe:
 
Touch should be appropriate to the situation
Touch should not impose a greater level of intimacy than the helpee can handle
Touch should not be patronising, or otherwise communicate a negative message (Fisher, Rytting, and Heslin, 1976).
 
A hug can be a special gesture at the end of a helping meeting, but it can also seem insincere if it is forced or if it is used routinely. Even if you do not touch or hug, you can convey the all-important sense of warmth through the other non-verbal means we have discussed. You will know that you have been successful when helpees open up, and/or when they appear visibly more calm and comforted.
 
References:
 
Blum, D. (1998). Face it! Psychology Today, 31(5), 32 – 70. In Young, M.E. (2005). Learning the art of helping: Building blocks and techniques. New Jersey: Pearson/Merrill Prentice Hall.
 
Driscoll, M.S., Newman, D. L., & Seals, J.M. (1988). The effect of touch on perception of helpers. Counsellor Education and Supervision, 27, 113—115. In Young, M.E. (2005). Learning the art of helping: Building blocks and techniques. New Jersey: Pearson/Merrill Prentice Hall.
 
Egan, G. (2006). Essentials of Skilled Helping: Managing problems, developing opportunities. California: Thomson-Wadsworth.
 
Ekman, P. (1975). Universal smile: Face muscles talk every language. Psychology Today. 9(4), 35 – 39. In Young, M.E. (2005). Learning the art of helping: Building blocks and techniques. New Jersey: Pearson/Merrill Prentice Hall.
 
Fisher, J.S., Rytting, M., & Heslin, R. (1976). Affective and valuative effects of an interpersonal touch. Sociometry, 39, 416-421. In Young, M.E. (2005). Learning the art of helping: Building blocks and techniques. New Jersey: Pearson/Merrill Prentice Hall.
 
Geldard and Geldard (2005). Basic personal counseling: A training manual for counselors. Australia: Pearson.
 
Highlen and Hill (1984). Factors affecting client change in counseling. In Brown, S.D., & Lent, R.W. (Eds). (2008). Handbook of counseling psychology (4th ed.), pp 334 – 396. New York: Wiley.
 
Willison, B.G., & Masson, R.L. (1986). The role of touch in therapy: An adjunct to communication. Journal of Counseling and Development, 64, 497—500.
 
Young, M.E. (2005). Learning the art of helping: Building blocks and techniques. New Jersey: Pearson/Merrill Prentice Hall.
 
Did you enjoy this article? Then share the feeling and forward it to a friend! Quick reminder: Please send this eZine to all your family and friends so they too can enjoy the benefits. Thank you.
 
Join our community:
 
 
Help those around you suffering mental illness in silence: www.mhss.net.au/lz
 
Intobookstore
The Institute has a list of recommended textbooks and DVDs which can add great value to your learning journey - and the good news is that you can purchase them very easily. The AIPC bookstore will give YOU:
  • Discounted prices!
  • Easy ordering method!
  • Quality guarantee!
This fortnight's feature is...
 
Name: Theory and Practice of Group Counselling, 7th edition
Authors: Corey, Gerald
AIPC Code: COREY3
AIPC Price: $103.46 (RRP $114.95)
ISBN: 978-053-464-1740
 
With this text, you will gain the knowledge and skills for effective group counselling and leadership and learn key theoretical approaches to group leadership and how to successfully apply each in practice.
 
To order this book, simply contact your nearest Student Support Centre or the AIPC Head Office (1800 657 667).
 
Intoarticles
 
Expression of Feelings in Early Childhood
 
All children begin their journey with no expectations and have a sense of wonder about their world (Doe & Walsh, 1998). As they travel through their life, events may occur in the child’s life that could contribute to the way they are feeling. If a child does not deal with events or situations, the child may encounter feelings of anger, abandonment, sadness, loneliness, resentment, blame, anxiety and separation, and feelings of not being heard and loved.
 
Helping the child to express their feelings and to understand why they are feeling the way they are will enhance their emotional, mental and physical well-being – bringing about a positive outcome.
 
Click here to continue reading this article...
 
 
A Person Centred Approach to Grief and Loss
 
Author: Liz Jeffrey
 
Maggie is a 35 year old woman who came for counselling six months after the break up of her nine year marriage to Michael, the father of her two children, Josh aged 6 and Joseph aged 12 months. Currently both children are in Maggie’s sole care. Maggie has been referred to counselling by her General Practitioner whom she has been seeing for a number of minor physical ailments and early signs of depression.
 
For ease of writing the Professional Counsellor is abbreviated to “C”.
 
Click here to continue reading this article...
 
Other articles: www.aipc.net.au/articles
 
Intodevelopment
 
Convenient Professional Development
 
Hundreds of counsellors, psychologists, social workers, mental health nurses and allied health professionals already access over 100 Hours of Professional Development online, for less than $1 a day. Now it's your turn.
 
Mental Health Academy (MHA) is the leading provider of professional development education for the mental health industry. MHA provides the largest variety of courses and videos workshops, all conveniently delivered via the internet.
 
With MHA, you no longer have to worry about high costs, proximity and availability, or fitting a workshop around your lifestyle!
 
You can access the huge range of PD, including courses and video workshops, whenever and from wherever you want.
 
Whether you are looking for courses on anxiety and depression, or a video workshop discussing the intricacies of relationship counselling - Mental Health Academy is your gateway to over 100 hours of professional development content.
 
Take a quick look at what Mental Health Academy offers:
  • Over 70 professionally developed courses.
  • On-demand, webstreamed video workshops.
  • Over 100 hours of professional development.
  • Extremely relevant topics.
  • New courses released every month.
  • Video supported training.
  • Online, 24/7 access to resources.
  • Endorsement by multiple Associations, including AASW, ACA and APS.
Begin your journey today. Click on the link below to register for a monthly or annual unlimited membership. As an unlimited member, you can access all MHA courses for less than $1 per day, and receive discounts when purchasing any video workshops:
 
 
 
Intoconnection
Have you visited the new Counselling Connection Blog yet? There are over 500 interesting posts including case studies, profiles, success stories, videos and much more. Make sure you too get connected (and thank you for those who have already submitted comments and suggestions).
 
Space to grieve everyday losses
 
Most common losses aren’t automatically recognized as being ‘grief-worthy,’ but clients often need help adjusting to a new reality just the same.
 
By Stacy Notaras Murphy
 
A client, Abby, comes to counseling to deal with feelings of loneliness and stress following an abrupt breakup with a long-term boyfriend. She had thought they would get married and now is questioning everything: her ability to be in a relationship, the meaning of the past few years and her value as a person. She reports ongoing sadness, moments of strong anger and fear at the prospect of wading back into the dating pool.
 
Abby says her friends are “sick of hearing about the breakup” and are encouraging her to “get back out there” and find someone new. Each of these conversations makes Abby feel worthless, embarrassed and even more alone.
 
Click here to read the full post...
 
Get new Counselling Connection posts delivered by email! Simply visit our FeedBurner subscription page and click the link on the subscription box: http://feeds.feedburner.com/CounsellingConnection.
 
 
Intotwitter
Follow us on Twitter and get the latest and greatest in counselling news. To follow, visit http://twitter.com/counsellingnews and click "Follow".
 
Featured Tweets
 
Free educational resources - including life effectiveness guides - are available from our official Blog: http://www.counsellingconnection.com/index.php/resources/
 
How To Be a Great Leader (in under 300 words) — PsyBlog: http://www.spring.org.uk/2012/03/how-to-be-a-great-leader-in-under-300-words.php
 
Dozens of articles in workplace counselling: http://www.bacpworkplace.org.uk/journal.php (available in PDF format)
 
"What Worries Australia?" A survey by the Centre for Emotional Health: http://ceh.whatworriesyouaustralia.sgizmo.com/s3/
 
Watching 'Mind, Body, Spirit: Perspectives on Mental Health': http://bit.ly/xYb1PF
 
NIMH Computer Based Treatment Eases Anxiety Symptoms in Children http://bit.ly/xtI7Qi
 
Bullying – Quick Facts and Information | Counselling Connection: http://www.counsellingconnection.com/index.php/2011/06/28/bullying-quick-facts-and-information/
 
Note that you need a Twitter profile to follow a list. If you do not have one yet, visit http://twitter.com to create a free profile today!
 
Tweet Count: 3240
Follower Count: 4335
 
Intoquotes
"The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place."
 
~ George Bernard Shaw
 
Intoseminars
Many students of the Diploma of Counselling attend seminars to complete the practical requirements of their course. Seminars provide an ideal opportunity to network with other students and liaise with qualified counselling professionals in conjunction with completing compulsory coursework.
 
Not sure if you need to attend Seminars? Click here for information on Practical Assessments.
 
Below are the seminars dates for the first semester of 2012. To register for a seminar, please contact your Student Support Centre.
 
To access the full list of 2012 seminars, visit: www.aipc.net.au/timetables.php.
 
BRISBANE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 26/05
Communication Skills II - 21/04, 23/06
The Counselling Process - 28/04
Counselling Therapies I - 24-25/03, 16-17/06
Counselling Therapies II - 14-15/04
Case Management - 14-15/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 09/06
 
CDA Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 26/05
Communication Skills II - 21/04, 23/06
The Counselling Process - 28/04
Counselling Therapies I - 24-25/03, 16-17/06
Counselling Therapies II - 14-15/04
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 12/05
Family Therapy - 02/06
Case Management - 14-15/06
 
GOLD COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 19/05
Communication Skills II - 16/06
The Counselling Process - 21/04
Counselling Therapies I - 23-24/03
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/05
Case Management - 30-31/03
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 21/04
Communication Skills I - 19/05
Communication Skills II - 16/06
Counselling Therapies I - 23-24/03
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 20/4
Family Therapy - 15/06
Case Management - 30-31/03
 
MELBOURNE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 14/04, 06/05, 03/06
Communication Skills II - 15/04, 12/05, 09/06
The Counselling Process - 01/04, 05/05, 02/06
Counselling Therapies I - 21-22/04, 19-20/05, 16-17/06
Counselling Therapies II - 28-29/04, 26-27/05, 23-24/06
Case Management - 31/03-01/04, 30/06-01/07
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 13/05
Counselling Applications - 14/04
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 01/04, 05/05, 02/06
Communication Skills I - 07/05, 05/02, 03/03, 14/04, 06/05, 03/06
Communication Skills II - 15/04, 12/05, 09/06
Counselling Therapies I - 21-22/04, 19-20/05, 16-17/06
Counselling Therapies II - 24-25/03, 28-29/04, 26-27/05, 23-24/06
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 13/05
Family Therapy - 10/06
Case Management - 31/03-01/04, 30/06-01/07
 
NORTHERN TERRITORY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 14/04
Counselling Therapies II - 28/04, 05/05
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 09/06
Counselling Applications - 12/05
 
CDA Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 14/04
Communication Skills II - 23/07
Counselling Therapies II - 28/04, 05/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 16/06
Family Therapy - 21/04, 15/09
 
SOUTH AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 24/03, 19/05
Communication Skills II - 25/03, 20/05
The Counselling Process - 01/04, 02/06
Counselling Therapies I - 28-29/04
Counselling Therapies II - 23-24/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 05/05
Counselling Applications - 16/06
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 01/04, 02/06
Communication Skills I - 24/03, 19/05
Communication Skills II - 25/03, 20/05
Counselling Therapies I - 28-29/04
Counselling Therapies II - 23-24/06
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 06/05
Family Therapy - 17/06
 
SUNSHINE COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 19/05
Communication Skills II - 20/05
The Counselling Process - 31/03, 30/06
Counselling Therapies II - 26-27/05
Case Management - 23-24/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 28/04
Counselling Applications - 14/07
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 31/03, 30/06
Communication Skills I - 19/05
Communication Skills II - 20/05
Counselling Therapies II - 26-27/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 14/04
Family Therapy - 02/06
Case Management - 23-24/06
 
SYDNEY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 27/03, 28/04, 05/06
Communication Skills II - 28/03, 05/05, 18/06
The Counselling Process - 26/03, 21/04, 12/05, 04/06, 21/06
Counselling Therapies I - 23-24/04, 15-16/06
Counselling Therapies II - 29-30/03, 17-18/05, 29-30/06
Case Management - 02-03/04, 22-23/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 07/05
Counselling Applications - 08/05
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 26/03, 21/04, 12/05, 04/06, 21/06
Communication Skills I - 27/03, 28/04, 05/06
Communication Skills II - 28/03, 05/05, 18/06
Counselling Therapies I - 23-24/04, 15-16/06
Counselling Therapies II - 29-30/03, 17-18/05, 29-30/06
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 24/03, 26/05
Family Therapy - 31/03, 01/06
Case Management - 02-03/04, 22-23/06
 
TASMANIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 25/03, 24/06
Communication Skills II - 06/05
The Counselling Process - 20/05
Counselling Therapies II - 29-30/04
Case Management - 14-15/04
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 17/06
Counselling Applications - 01/04
 
CDA Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 25/03, 24/06
Communication Skills II - 06/05
The Counselling Process - 20/05
Counselling Therapies II - 29-30/04
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 27/05
Case Management - 14-15/04
 
WESTERN AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 28/04, 26/05, 07/06
Communication Skills II - 29/04, 27/05
The Counselling Process - 14/04, 12/05
Counselling Therapies I - 21-22/04, 09-10/06
Counselling Therapies II - 05-06/05
Case Management - 19-20/05
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 16/06
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 14/04, 12/05
Communication Skills I - 28/04, 26/05, 07/06
Communication Skills II - 29/04, 27/05
Counselling Therapies I - 21-22/04, 09-10/06
Counselling Therapies II - 05-06/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 02/06
Case Management - 19-20/05
 
Important Note: Advertising of the dates above does not guarantee availability of places in the seminar. Please check availability with the respective Student Support Centre.
 
 
   Training Courses
 
 
 
Help those around you suffering mental illness in silence: www.mhss.net.au/lz 
 

Counselling & Psychology Courses

Educational Resources

Community Projects

Contact Us | Copyright Notice | e-Communications Policy