In this Issue

Hello!
Intothediploma
Intonews
Intocounselling
Intobookstore
Intoarticles
Intodevelopment
Intoconnection
Intotwitter
Intoquotes
Intoseminars

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Editor: Sandra Poletto
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Copyright: 2012 Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors

Hello!
Welcome to Edition 153 of Institute Inbrief. A Happy New Year to you – we hope you had a great time with your loved ones and away from usual commitments and responsibilities. In this edition’s featured article we explore the expression of feelings in early childhood.
 
Also in this edition:
 
-      Final Places – Bachelor of Psychological Science & Counselling
-      Previously Published Articles
-      Professional Development news
-      Blog and Twitter updates
-      Upcoming seminar dates
 
If you would like to access daily articles & resources, and interact with over 4300 peers, make sure you join our Facebook community today: www.facebook.com/counsellors. It is a great way to stay in touch and share your interest and knowledge in counselling.
 
Enjoy your reading,
 
 
Editor
 
 
Join our community:
 
 
 
Help those around you suffering mental illness in silence: http://mhfa.aipc.net.au/lz
 
Intothediploma
 
Imagine Being Passionate About Your Work
And Assisting People Every Day Lead Better Lives
 
It’s rare these days to hear people talk about their work with true passion. You hear so many stories of people working to pay the bills; putting up with imperfect situations; and compromising on their true desires.
 
That’s why it’s always so refreshing to hear regular stories from graduates living their dream to be a Counsellor. They’re always so full of energy, enthusiasm and passion. There’s no doubt that counselling is one of the most personally rewarding and enriching professions.
 
Just imagine someone comes to you for assistance. They’re emotionally paralysed by events in their life. They can’t even see a future for themselves. They can only focus on their pain and grief. The despair is so acute it pervades their entire life. Their relationship is breaking down and heading towards a divorce. They can’t focus on work and are getting in trouble with their boss. They feel they should be able to handle their problems alone, but know they can’t. It makes them feel helpless, worthless. Their self-esteem has never been lower. They’re caught in a cycle of destruction and pain.
 
Now imagine you have the knowledge and skills to help this person overcome their challenges. You assist to relieve their intense emotional pain. You give them hope for the future. You assist to rebuild their self-esteem and lead a satisfying, empowered life.
 
As a Counsellor you can experience these personal victories every day. And it’s truly enriching. There is nothing more fulfilling than helping another person overcome seemingly impossible obstacles.
 
Watch inspirational stories from some of our Graduates: www.aipc.net.au/gradvideo
 
Learn how you can become a Counsellor. Visit www.aipc.net.au/lz today!
 
Intonews
 
Final Places – Bachelor of Psychological Science & Counselling
 
Just a few weeks ago we opened up enrolments into the Bachelor of Psychological Science and already the majority of places have been filled. But there are still some places remaining.
 
If you want a secure future doing something you love, then Psychology could be ideal for you.
 
Psychology is one of the most in-demand occupations. It has grown by 77% over the last 5 years, outgrowing all other occupations by almost 600%.
 
Psychology is also one of the most flexible qualifications, offering you rewarding careers in a diverse range of fields such as private practice, HR, human services, public health, market research, organisational development, education, defence services and more.
 
Our unique learning model means you can earn-while-you-learn, so you don’t have to give up work to fit in your studies.
 
-      Study externally from anywhere in Australia, even overseas.
-      Fund your tuition with Fee-Help.
-      SAVE up to $40,000 on your qualification.
-      Can start with just 1 subject.
-      Online learning portal with access to all study materials, readings and video lectures.
-      Attend residential schools to integrate your learning.
-      Accredited by the Australian Psychology Accreditation Council (APAC).
-      No minimum HSC or OP results required to gain entry.
-      Learn in a friendly, small group environment.
 
You can submit your obligation free expression of interest (or enrol) in the Bachelor of Psychological Science here: www.aip.edu.au/lz
 
Enrolments and expressions of interest into our Bachelor of Counselling are also open. You can learn more here: www.aipc.edu.au/degree
 
We will hit capacity enrolments for Semester 1 2012 very soon. So if you’re thinking about a career in psychology or counselling, please submit your interest now to avoid missing out.
 
More information on the programs:
 
Bachelor of Psychological Science: www.aip.edu.au/lz
 
Bachelor of Counselling: www.aipc.edu.au/degree
 
Intocounselling
 
Expression of Feelings in Early Childhood
 
All children begin their journey with no expectations and have a sense of wonder about their world (Doe & Walsh, 1998). As they travel through their life, events may occur in the child's life that could contribute to the way they are feeling. If a child does not deal with events or situations, the child may encounter feelings of anger, abandonment, sadness, loneliness, resentment, blame, anxiety and separation, and feelings of not being heard and loved.
 
Helping the child to express their feelings and to understand why they are feeling the way they are will enhance their emotional, mental and physical well-being - bringing about a positive outcome.
 
Stages of Development
 
As children travel through the journey of life they are faced with many different developmental challenges. Early in life, babies learn to pay attention and be part of a relationship. As they grow they learn to use their imagination and think logically.
 
Greenspan and Salmon (1995) developed a road map outlining the emotional milestones children need to pass through on their way to a healthier, mature personality. They propose that at each stage children learn basic abilities that carry them forward into the next stage and as children pass through these emotional milestones their ability to think, reason and feel become more advanced.
 
Stage 1: The Ability to Look, Listen and Be Calm: One of the first abilities that all babies need is to be calm so that it is possible for them to be interested in and attentive to people, things, sounds, smells and movements. If on the other hand the baby is sensitive to noises and unexpected hugs they may become overwhelmed and find it more difficult to be calm.
 
Stage 2: The Ability to Feel Close to Others: At this stage children have the ability to feel close to others. The child's inner security gives them the capacity to be warm and trusting. On the other hand children who are aloof, withdrawn or expect to be humiliated can become isolated and unable to relate to people in a warm trusting way.
 
Stage 3: Two-Way Communication: At the communication stage children learn to read body language and facial expressions. They also learn to form mental pictures or images so they may form ideas about their wants, needs and emotions. They are able to feel whether they are safe and secure with an adult or whether the adult is dangerous, critical or rejecting. Children who have difficulties understanding facial expressions or changes in vocal tone find it difficult to make these quick and intuitive judgements.
 
Stage 4: Emotional Ideas: At this stage children can start to exercise their minds, bodies and emotions as one. They learn how to form mental pictures or images about their wants, needs and emotions and begin to use an idea, expressed in words, to communicate something about what they want, feel, or what they are going to do. Having this ability opens a whole new world of opportunities and growth. Children who use emotional ideas in make-believe play e.g. dolls hugging or fighting, or making up a story about how another child might be feeling, are making creative leaps based on this ability to use their imagination. 
 
If children are sensitive to visual images and to changes in vocal tone, a make-believe story e.g. animal faces and strange voices, may be frightening and overwhelming. These children are very nervous about entering into the world of fantasy and imagination. According to Greenspan and Salmon (1995), children who have problems controlling their aggression often have difficulty acknowledging their own feelings and expressing the idea of those emotions through words. They have found that children who have an action approach to life may have a certain degree of difficulty identifying their intentions and feelings; therefore use aggression as a way to cope with challenging situations.
 
Stage 5: Emotional Thinking: When children reach the emotional thinking stage they go past labelling a feeling, they become able to think with these images starting to connect an idea and a feeling and recognising that one is causing the other e.g. they might say “I'm angry today because you didn't come and play with me”.
 
At this stage children start to make the distinction between fantasy and reality. They understand more about what is coming from inside them and what influences are external to them. Children who find it difficult to process the information they are hearing find it much easier to live in their own private world. Greenspan and Salmon (1995) have found these children are usually very dramatic but when asked a difficult question they tend to ignore the question and retreat further into their own fantasies, compromising their emotional thinking.
 
Stage 6: The Age of Fantasy and Unlimited Power: This is the stage when children from the age of four and a half to seven years develop their abilities to relate, communicate, imagine and think. They have a curiosity about life and a deep sense of wonder about the world. It is the stage where they may start to express themselves fearlessly.
 
Greenspan and Salmon (1995) have named this stage as the “world is my oyster”. There is a great sense of magic and little boys may imagine themselves to be a Ninja Turtle or a power ranger, while little girls may imagine themselves to be Cinderella or Barbie. The relationship they have with their parents and others around them helps to develop greater emotional flexibility allowing them to work out complicated feelings without volatile outbursts. 
 
This is also the time where children may become fearful. For example, they may worry about ghosts or have bad feelings concerning being kidnapped. In a child who is oversensitive to sound or touch, the fearful side of life can be overwhelming.
 
If all goes well at this stage children start to understand what reality is, while at the same time still having a degree of fantasy and unlimited power. They have a better understanding of more complicated relationships and become more emotionally stable e.g. they develop a capacity for more “adult” emotions such as guilt or empathy (although empathy is easily lost when they are feeling jealous or competitive). Having all these abilities helps children move out into the wider world (Greenspan & Salmon, 1995).
 
The Different Personality Traits in Children
 
According to Greenspan and Salmon (1995) a child's personality is not simply a product of nature and nurture but a product of the continuous interplay between nature and nurture. Greenspan and Salmon (1995) state that “this interplay happens between children and their parents”. For example, parents nurture their child with warmth and love which interacts with the child's nature, a new pattern of interaction is created. This new form of relationship helps children to develop the warmth and confidence they need.
 
A child's temperament (nature) is considered to be what they are born with. If a child has a difficult temperament they can be faced with a great deal of challenges throughout their life. These children tend to sleep less and are more demanding and impulsive. Although the child's temperament can stay with them to some extent and shape their personality it can be modified a great deal by the way they are loved (nurture). For example, if children are brought up in a nurturing environment and able to express their feelings whether sad or happy, they tend to have a smoother road than children who are brought up in a stressful or neglectful environment (Cooper, 2006).
 
Five Basic Personality Patterns
 
Greenspan and Salmon (1995) describe five basic personality patterns and the emotional characteristics that accompany these patterns.
 
The Highly Sensitive Child: In the first few months of life, babies generally learn how to calm and regulate themselves. They usually remain interested and alert, but the highly sensitive baby finds it hard to master these emotional skills. They find it hard to relate to people, sights, sounds, smells and even the thought of touching dad's rough beard can overwhelm them. As they get older they tend to be demanding and clingy.
 
They are upset easily by new situations and may be frightened of children who are more assertive than them, resulting in increased aggressiveness (through fear) and they may choose not to play with other children. When sensitive children approach school, their fears appear to grow causing them to be more vulnerable to feelings of embarrassment and humiliation. They may also go through fantasies of feeling that they are the “best” which sometimes results in them being moody, self-centred and demanding.
 
The Self-Absorbed Child: The self-absorbed baby usually seems very content to lie in their cots playing with their fingers or sleeping. After crawling around the baby who withdraws seems to be very content just to sit there and wait for a toy. When they become toddlers instead of wanting to explore like other children they may just want to sit quietly.
 
Withdrawn children are usually interested in make-believe and tend to prefer their imagery world to reality, therefore being able to communicate with them about real situations such as how their day was at school, could be a real challenge. Sometimes they prefer to stay close to mum and dad and will often have only one or two friends. When challenged by anything they may tend to give up easily.
 
The Defiant Child: Defiant children tend to be stubborn, negative and controlling. They react in negative ways to most situations usually getting stuck in the “no” stage. Their defiant behaviour can develop into negative patterns. These patterns can appear at any age and extend into all areas of their life. During the ages of two and four, emotional ideas and emotional thinking tends to become rigid and inflexible.
 
The defiant child likes to be very controlling insisting that they are right about everything such as bedtime, the clothes they are wearing and the food they eat. As they start school they appear to be more concrete and focused on planning small pieces of their own world instead of accepting all of it. As they are very bright and hardworking, they appear to have perfectionist qualities putting high expectations on themselves. They tend to cope with their tendency to be overwhelmed by restricting any emotional input and avoiding challenging situations.
 
The Inattentive Child: Children with attentive problems may not respond well to anything that appears complex. It can be very difficult to have a conversation with them because they change from one topic to another. Their attention span is limited causing them to follow very limited instruction and their inability to maintain concentration makes them poor listeners. Having this difficulty usually results in the child finding it difficult to express themselves, for example describing their day or answering a question that the teacher asks.
 
Inattentive children appear to be paying attention in the classroom but while their bodies remain stationary their minds wander aimlessly through a universe of ideas and images. Frequently, their academic performance will reflect their lack of connection with classroom activities and their lack of assertiveness makes it easy for them to be overlooked and lost in the crowd (Moore, 2000).
 
The inattentive child tends to be disconnected from thought, expression, creativity, books, words, people and their feelings. These children are usually branded with having Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD). Children who have this disorder can have a very low self-image and self-esteem due to experiencing repeated failures, misunderstandings and mislabels e.g. being called dumb, stupid, spacey and lazy.
 
Inattentive children are predominately classed as “daydreamers”; they are distracted easily, make careless mistakes and are usually overwhelmed by stimulating situations. This is unlike children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD) who daydream occasionally, fidget, talk excessively, have problems staying seated and are usually energised by stimulating situations.
 
Inattentive children require a great degree of self-acceptance and patience with themselves because of the frustration they may encounter. In helping these children the focus needs to be on their strengths rather than always correcting their weaknesses.
 
The Active/Aggressive Child: These children are constantly running instead of walking and acting instead of talking. They tend to jump into new experiences and worry about the consequences of their actions later. At school they are nearly always the class trouble maker, throwing books around and enticing other children to yell and scream. They can be easily frustrated and angered and might resort to hitting, punching and pinching to get what they want.
 
When the active/aggressive child gets frustrated they are not quiet about it, causing them to act out physically trying to change what they don't like. Anger and aggressive feelings are sometimes unavoidable but as long as these feelings are balanced with feelings of closeness and empathy active/aggressive children can be motivated into doing more than they thought would be possible. Children need to acknowledge all their own feelings (good or bad) so that these emotions can become part of their gradual development towards their sense of self.
 
Being able to find their sense of self helps them to become integrated people capable of being able to nurture, be assertive and to love. Aggression in children can be very taxing and can vary considerably, therefore understanding the underlying physical and emotional reasons behind the aggression can help them grow and develop emotionally. For example, if a child comes from an impulsive, aggressive family life and is neglected emotionally or is physically abused, there is an increased chance that the child will become violent. Some of the characteristics that these children seem to share are:
 
-      The tendency not to care for others because no one has cared for them,
-      The inability to communicate their desires, intentions and feelings, and
-      The inability to piece together internal dialogues.
 
When these children feel that their sense of frustration is as big as a mountain, instead of expressing their feelings they tend to act out with disruptive, aggressive behaviour. According to Greenspan and Salmon (1995) they tend to speak only of actions rather than feelings and when challenged they respond with impulsive actions (hitting) rather than recognising their feelings and making choices.
 
References:
 
Cooper, J. (2006). Getting on with others. Lane Cove: Finch Publishing Pty Ltd.
 
Greenspan, S.I., & Salmon, J. (1995). The challenging child: Understanding, raising and enjoying the five "difficult" types of children. Cambridge, MA: Perseus Books.
 
Moore, D. (2000). Inattentive add: Working with the wandering mind. Retrieved October, 2007 from: http://www.adda-sr.org/reading/Articles/mooreinattentive.htm
 
Did you enjoy this article? Then share the feeling and forward it to a friend! Quick reminder: Please send this eZine to all your family and friends so they too can enjoy the benefits. Thank you.
 
Join our community:
 
 
Help those around you suffering mental illness in silence: http://mhfa.aipc.net.au/lz
 
Intobookstore
The Institute has a list of recommended textbooks and DVDs which can add great value to your learning journey - and the good news is that you can purchase them very easily. The AIPC bookstore will give YOU:
 
-      Discounted prices!
-      Easy ordering method!
-      Quality guarantee!
 
This fortnight's feature is...
 
Name: Putting together the pieces: Recovering and rebuilding life after trauma
Authors: Francess Day
AIPC Code: DAY
AIPC Price: $50.00 (RRP $45.00)
ISBN: 0-9580102-0-X
 
This is an important book which will greatly assist other victims of crime and trauma to confront their fears. It is written in a way that will give both moral and practical support to victims and their families.
 
To order this book, simply contact your nearest Student Support Centre or the AIPC Head Office (1800 657 667).
 
Intoarticles
 
Behaviour and Solution Focused Couple Therapy
 
The practice of couple therapy has been encouraged to incorporate a more scientific model of practice and the use of research to inform the style of therapy most appropriate to use (Whiting & Crane, 2003). As a result, the discipline of couple and family counselling is moving to an evidence based focus.
 
A number of theoretical frameworks have attempted to conceptualise dyadic relationships. Some of these theories have become foundations for the interventions that have become common in couple’s therapy today. Some of the models and theories include the strategic model, emotion focused therapy, solution focused therapy, behaviour theory and attachment theory.
 
In this article we overview two of these approaches.
 
Click here to continue reading this article...
 
 
Pluralism: Towards a New Paradigm for Therapy
 
How can we move beyond ‘schoolism’ towards a paradigm that embraces the full diversity of effective therapeutic methods and perspectives? Mick Cooper and John McLeod propose a ‘pluralistic’ approach.
 
Increasingly, counsellors and psychotherapists are becoming concerned that we are moving towards a therapeutic ‘monoculture’ in which cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) dominates; and in which other therapeutic orientations – such as psychodynamic, person-centred and integrative – are marginalised: freely-available only for clients who actively decline CBT, (1) or in the private and voluntary sectors.
 
Yet this current threat can be seen as just one manifestation of a deeper trend within the counselling and psychotherapy world towards splitting and dividing, and to pitting one school of therapeutic thought and practice against another. ‘Over the years,’ write Duncan et al, (2) ‘new schools of therapy arrived with the regularity of the Book-of-the-Month Club’s main selection’. Today it is estimated that there are more than 400 different types of therapy, (3) with the majority of practitioners in the UK tending to identify with one or other of these schools. (4)
 
Click here to continue reading this article...
 
Other articles: www.aipc.net.au/articles
 
Intodevelopment
 
Convenient Professional Development
 
Hundreds of counsellors, psychologists, social workers, mental health nurses and allied health professionals already access over 100 Hours of Professional Development online, for less than $1 a day. Now it's your turn.
 
Mental Health Academy (MHA) is the leading provider of professional development education for the mental health industry. MHA provides the largest variety of courses and videos workshops, all conveniently delivered via the internet.
 
With MHA, you no longer have to worry about high costs, proximity and availability, or fitting a workshop around your lifestyle!
 
You can access the huge range of PD, including courses and video workshops, whenever and from wherever you want.
 
Whether you are looking for courses on anxiety and depression, or a video workshop discussing the intricacies of relationship counselling - Mental Health Academy is your gateway to over 100 hours of professional development content.
 
Take a quick look at what Mental Health Academy offers:
 
-      Over 70 professionally developed courses.
-      On-demand, webstreamed video workshops.
-      Over 100 hours of professional development.
-      Extremely relevant topics.
-      New courses released every month.
-      Video supported training.
-      Online, 24/7 access to resources.
-      Endorsement by multiple Associations, including AASW, ACA and APS.
 
Begin your journey today. Click on the link below to register for a monthly or annual unlimited membership. As an unlimited member, you can access all MHA courses for less than $1 per day, and receive discounts when purchasing any video workshops:
 
 
 
Intoconnection
Have you visited the new Counselling Connection Blog yet? There are over 500 interesting posts including case studies, profiles, success stories, videos and much more. Make sure you too get connected (and thank you for those who have already submitted comments and suggestions).
 
MHSS: What’s in it for you?
 
Why do you want to become a mental health social supporter? Are you caring for someone now? Is it a relative or friend? If you are supporting someone, why are you doing it: do you want to, or do you feel obliged? Maybe you’re a founding member of a community chapter of Gamblers Anonymous, and you reluctantly front up to the meetings because – even though you’re a long-ago recovered gambler – the group would falter if you didn’t lend your energy…
 
Or perhaps you are supporting your friend who is caring for a chronically ill parent. The support work is intense, but you do it because you just want to help – and your friend has always been there for you. There are so many reasons why we do the things we do. Here we look at some typical motivations for being a mental health social supporter. With each one, we’ll discuss first the need or motivation that a support person may have for helping, and then alert you to a possible “hidden” motivation (often, hidden from even the helper) that may lie within the more obvious need.
 
Click here to read the full post...
 
Get new Counselling Connection posts delivered by email! Simply visit our FeedBurner subscription page and click the link on the subscription box: http://feeds.feedburner.com/CounsellingConnection.
 
 
Intotwitter
Follow us on Twitter and get the latest and greatest in counselling news. To follow, visit http://twitter.com/counsellingnews and click "Follow".
 
Featured Tweets
 
The art of noticing: Being mindful of how the losses of life affect us http://bit.ly/shTlPk
 
Mental health problems taking toll on employees, work productivity: http://ct.counseling.org/2011/12/mental-health-problems-taking-toll-on-employees-work-productivity/
 
Binge eating is linked with depression, according to study http://bit.ly/uRdXay
 
Indecisiveness over the little things can lead to overall unhappiness, study warns http://bit.ly/rxpFBf
 
AIPC Article Library » Solution-Focused Communication Skills Training" http://www.aipc.net.au/articles/?p=233
 
Respect for the Client: http://counsellingconnection.com/?p=781
 
Facebook is set to pair depressed users with crisis counselors http://bit.ly/t6Bddc
 
Note that you need a Twitter profile to follow a list. If you do not have one yet, visit http://twitter.com to create a free profile today!
 
Tweet Count: 3162
Follower Count: 4098
 
Intoquotes
"Coming together is a beginning; keeping together is progress; working together is success."
 
~ Henry Ford
 
Intoseminars
Many students of the Diploma of Counselling attend seminars to complete the practical requirements of their course. Seminars provide an ideal opportunity to network with other students and liaise with qualified counselling professionals in conjunction with completing compulsory coursework.
 
Not sure if you need to attend Seminars? Click here for information on Practical Assessments.
 
Below are the seminars dates for the first semester of 2012. To register for a seminar, please contact your Student Support Centre.
 
To access the full list of 2012 seminars, visit: www.aipc.net.au/timetables.php.
 
BRISBANE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 03/03, 26/05
Communication Skills II - 04/02, 21/04, 23/06
The Counselling Process - 11/02, 28/04
Counselling Therapies I - 24-25/03, 16-17/06
Counselling Therapies II - 14-15/04
Case Management - 18-19/02, 14-15/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 25/02, 09/06
Counselling Applications - 10/03
 
CDA Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 03/03, 26/05
Communication Skills II - 04/02, 21/04, 23/06
The Counselling Process - 11/02, 28/04
Counselling Therapies I - 24-25/03, 16-17/06
Counselling Therapies II - 14-15/04
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 12/05
Family Therapy - 02/06
Case Management - 18-19/02, 14-15/06
 
GOLD COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 25/02, 19/05
Communication Skills II - 17/03, 16/06
The Counselling Process - 21/01, 21/04
Counselling Therapies I - 23-24/03
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/05
Case Management - 30-31/03
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 20/01
Counselling Applications - 03/02
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 21/01, 21/04
Communication Skills I - 25/02, 19/05
Communication Skills II - 17/03, 16/06
Counselling Therapies I - 23-24/03
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 20/4
Family Therapy - 15/06
Case Management - 30-31/03
 
MELBOURNE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 05/02, 03/03, 14/04, 06/05, 03/06
Communication Skills II - 8/01, 11/02, 04/03, 15/04, 12/05, 09/06
The Counselling Process - 13/01, 04/02, 02/03, 01/04, 05/05, 02/06
Counselling Therapies I - 14-15/01, 18-19/02, 17-18/03, 21-22/04, 19-20/05, 16-17/06
Counselling Therapies II - 21-22/01, 25-26/02, 24-25/03, 28-29/04, 26-27/05, 23-24/06
Case Management - 28-29/01, 31/03-01/04, 30/06-01/07
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 12/02, 13/05
Counselling Applications - 28/01, 14/04
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 13/01, 04/02, 02/03, 01/04, 05/05, 02/06
Communication Skills I - 07/05, 05/02, 03/03, 14/04, 06/05, 03/06
Communication Skills II - 8/01, 11/02, 04/03, 15/04, 12/05, 09/06
Counselling Therapies I - 14-15/01, 18-19/02, 17-18/03, 21-22/04, 19-20/05, 16-17/06
Counselling Therapies II - 21-22/01, 25-26/02, 24-25/03, 28-29/04, 26-27/05, 23-24/06
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 12/02, 13/05
Family Therapy - 26/02, 10/06
Case Management - 28-29/01, 31/03-01/04, 30/06-01/07
 
NORTHERN TERRITORY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 14/04
The Counselling Process - 25/02
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/03
Counselling Therapies II - 28/04, 05/05
Case Management - 11-12/02
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 10/03, 09/06
Counselling Applications - 12/05
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 25/02
Communication Skills I - 14/04
Communication Skills II - 23/07
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/03
Counselling Therapies II - 28/04, 05/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 16/06
Family Therapy - 21/04, 15/09
Case Management - 11-12/02
 
SOUTH AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 04/02, 24/03, 19/05
Communication Skills II - 05/02, 25/03, 20/05
The Counselling Process - 18/02, 01/04, 02/06
Counselling Therapies I - 28-29/04
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/02, 23-24/06
Case Management - 03-04/03
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 28/01, 05/05
Counselling Applications - 11/02, 16/06
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 18/02, 01/04, 02/06
Communication Skills I - 04/02, 24/03, 19/05
Communication Skills II - 05/02, 25/03, 20/05
Counselling Therapies I - 28-29/04
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/02, 23-24/06
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 29/01, 06/05
Family Therapy - 12/02, 17/06
Case Management - 03-04/03
 
SUNSHINE COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 19/05
Communication Skills II - 20/05
The Counselling Process - 31/03, 30/06
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/03
Counselling Therapies II - 26-27/05
Case Management - 23-24/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 28/04
Counselling Applications - 14/07
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 31/03, 30/06
Communication Skills I - 19/05
Communication Skills II - 20/05
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/03
Counselling Therapies II - 26-27/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 14/04
Family Therapy - 02/06
Case Management - 23-24/06
 
SYDNEY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 20/01, 25/02, 27/03, 28/04, 05/06
Communication Skills II - 21/01, 29/02, 28/03, 05/05, 18/06
The Counselling Process - 14/01, 02/02, 18/02, 05/03, 26/03, 21/04, 12/05, 04/06, 21/06
Counselling Therapies I - 30-31/01, 02-03/03, 23-24/04, 15-16/06
Counselling Therapies II - 16-17/02, 29-30/03, 17-18/05, 29-30/06
Case Management - 09-10/02, 02-03/04, 22-23/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 23/02, 07/05
Counselling Applications - 24/02, 08/05
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 14/01, 02/02, 18/02, 05/03, 26/03, 21/04, 12/05, 04/06, 21/06
Communication Skills I - 20/01, 25/02, 27/03, 28/04, 05/06
Communication Skills II - 21/01, 29/02, 28/03, 05/05, 18/06
Counselling Therapies I - 30-31/01, 02-03/03, 23-24/04, 15-16/06
Counselling Therapies II - 16-17/02, 29-30/03, 17-18/05, 29-30/06
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 23/01, 24/03, 26/05
Family Therapy - 24/01, 31/03, 01/06
Case Management - 09-10/02, 02-03/04, 22-23/06
 
TASMANIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 25/03, 24/06
Communication Skills II - 05/02, 06/05
The Counselling Process - 19/02, 20/05
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/03
Counselling Therapies II - 29-30/04
Case Management - 14-15/04
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 26/02, 17/06
Counselling Applications - 01/04
 
CDA Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 25/03, 24/06
Communication Skills II - 05/02, 06/05
The Counselling Process - 19/02, 20/05
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/03
Counselling Therapies II - 29-30/04
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 27/05
Family Therapy - 11/03
Case Management - 14-15/04
 
WESTERN AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 07/01, 11/02, 10/03, 28/04, 26/05, 07/06
Communication Skills II - 08/01, 12/02, 11/03, 29/04, 27/05
The Counselling Process - 14/01, 18/02, 17/03, 14/04, 12/05
Counselling Therapies I - 21-22/01, 21-22/04, 09-10/06
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/02, 05-06/05
Case Management - 28-29/01, 19-20/05
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 19/02, 16/06
Counselling Applications - 18/03
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 14/01, 18/02, 17/03, 14/04, 12/05
Communication Skills I - 07/01, 11/02, 10/03, 28/04, 26/05, 07/06
Communication Skills II - 08/01, 12/02, 11/03, 29/04, 27/05
Counselling Therapies I - 21-22/01, 21-22/04, 09-10/06
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/02, 05-06/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 03/03, 02/06
Family Therapy - 04/03
Case Management - 28-29/01, 19-20/05
 
Important Note: Advertising of the dates above does not guarantee availability of places in the seminar. Please check availability with the respective Student Support Centre.
 
 
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