In this Issue

Hello!
Intobachelor
Intothediploma
Intomhss
Intocounselling
Intobookstore
Intoarticles
Intodevelopment
Intoconnection
Intotwitter
Intoquotes
Intoseminars

Contact us

Publications

Editor: Sandra Poletto
Email: ezine@aipc.net.au
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Copyright: 2012 Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors

Hello!
Welcome to Edition 184 of Institute Inbrief. Although only recently embraced by Western psychology, mindfulness practices and techniques have been part of many Eastern philosophies for thousands of years. In this edition’s featured article we explore what mindfulness is (and is not), and review some of the clinical applications of mindfulness.
 
Also in this edition:
  • MHSS Workshops – July/August
  • Articles and CPD updates
  • Blog and Twitter updates
  • Upcoming seminar dates
Book sale: We are selling a range of counselling and psychology books at discounted prices via the Bookon marketplace: http://bookon.com.au/Sellers/aipcsso/. Stocks are very limited - it's first in, first served. Check out the available titles and let your friends know before stocks run out!
 
Enjoy your reading,
 
Editor.
 
 
Join our community:
 
 
 
 
Intobachelor
 
Become A Counsellor or Expand On Your Qualifications
With Australia’s Most Cost Effective & Flexible
 Bachelor of Counselling
 
AIPC is Australia’s largest and longest established educator of Counsellors. Over the past 22-years we’ve helped over 55,000 people from 27 countries pursue their dream of becoming a professional Counsellor.
 
The Bachelor of Counselling is a careful blend of theory and practical application. Theory is learnt through user-friendly learning materials that have been carefully designed to make your studies as accessible and conducive to learning as possible.
 
You can gain up to a full year’s academic credit (and save up to $8,700.00 with RPL) with a Diploma qualification. And with Fee-Help you don’t have to pay your subject fees upfront.
 
Here are some facts about the course:
  • Save up to $26,400.00 on your qualification.
  • Get started with NO MONEY DOWN using FEE-HELP.
  • Save up to $8,700.00 with RPL.
  • You will be supported by a large team of highly-qualified counselling professionals.
  • Study externally with individualised personal support.
  • Attend Residential Schools in Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane to hone your practical skills and network with other students.
You can learn more here: www.aipc.edu.au/degree
 
Watch our 2013 TV ad: www.aipc.net.au/tv2013
 
 
Become A Psychologist
 
Earn-While-You-Learn With Australia's
Best Value-for-Money & Flexible
Bachelor of Psychological Science
 
Psychology is one of the most versatile undergraduate courses, leading to many different career opportunities. And now there's a truly flexible way to get your qualification – with internal or external study options. It means working while you study is a realistic alternative.
 
Cost of living pressures and lifestyle choices are evolving the way we learn and Australian Institute of Psychology (AIP) is paving the way through flexible, innovative learning models:
  • Save up to $35,800 on your qualification.
  • Get started with NO MONEY DOWN with FEE-HELP.
  • Earn while you learn with flexible external learning options.
  • Be supported by a large team of highly-qualified Psychology professionals.
  • Study internally or externally with individualised personal support.
  • Enjoy a flexible and supportive learning experience.
  • Benefit from less onerous course entry requirements.
AIP is a registered Higher Education Provider with the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations, delivering a three-year Bachelor of Psychological Science. The Bachelor of Psychological Science is accredited by the Australian Psychology Accreditation Council (APAC), the body that sets the standards of training for Psychology education in Australasia.
 
APAC accreditation requirements are uniform across all universities and providers in the country, meaning that Australian Institute of Psychology, whilst a private Higher Education Provider, is required to meet exactly the same high quality standards of training, education and support as any university provider in the country.
 
You can learn more here: www.aip.edu.au/degree
 
Watch our 2013 TV ad: www.aip.edu.au/tv2013
 
Intothediploma
 
AIPC provides you with Flexible Course Delivery Modes
So YOU set the rules for how and when you learn...
 
AIPC’s accredited and nationally recognised Diploma of Counselling is designed so that you determine the manner and pace you study. You study entirely at your own pace (except of course if you’re receiving a government benefit such as Austudy) and you can start at any time, graduating in only 18-months.
 
Not only can you set the pace you study, you also determine the mode you want to study. You can study externally (at home with phone and email access to our counselling tutors); in-Class; online or any combination… all the time fully supported by our huge national team throughout our 8 Student Support Centres.
 
External learning means you can complete your entire course from the comfort of your home (or office, or overseas, or virtually anywhere). Your course comes complete with fully self-contained, referenced and professionally presented learning materials including 18 individual workbooks and readings. It really is as simple as working through the material and contacting us for support along the way. If you live locally to one of our support centres you can also attend tutorials to provide you with face to face contact if you wish (this option is ideal if you enjoy working more independently or have a busy schedule).
 
In-Class learning is a classroom forum where you learn with other students from a qualified lecturer. Classes are available in most main cities, at flexible times. In-Class is a great way for you to accelerate your learning, interact with other students and stay highly motivated. (This option is particularly suitable if you enjoy learning in the classroom environment with other students).
 
Online learning allows you to complete your learning entirely via your PC. You still receive all the high quality hardcopy resources (so you don’t miss out on anything!), but you’ll access all your learning materials and complete assessments online.
 
Any Combination. Of course you don’t have to stick with one learning method throughout your studies. You’re welcome to use whichever method suits your needs and desires at the time. You may choose to complete one workbook in-Class, another online, then externally. Whatever is most convenient!
 
Learn more - visit www.aipc.net.au/lz today!
 
Intomhss
 
Australia is suffering a Mental Health Crisis
 
Our suicide rate is now TWICE our road toll. Many suicides could possibly be averted, if only the people close to the victim were able to identify the early signs and appropriately intervene.
 
RIGHT NOW someone you care about – a family member, friend, or colleague – may be suffering in silence, and you don’t know.
 
With the right training, you can help that family member, friend or colleague.
 
Save $100 when you book your seat in an upcoming MHSS Workshop.
 
Upcoming workshops in July/August:
  • East Doncaster, VIC: 18 & 19 July
  • Glandore, SA: 20 & 21 July
  • Gold Coast, QLD: 27 & 28 July
  • Coffs Harbour, NSW: 31 July & 1 August
  • Lavington (Albury Wodonga), NSW: 6 & 7 August
  • Gold Coast, QLD: 10 & 11 August
  • Launceston, TAS: 15 & 16 August
  • Narre Warren, VIC: 15 & 16 August
  • Gold Coast, QLD: 24 & 25 August
  • Glandore, SA: 31 August & 1 September
Book your seat now: www.mhss.net.au/find-a-course
 
Your registration includes the 2-day facilitated workshop; a hardcopy of the MHSS Student Workbook; and access to an online dashboard where you can obtain your certificate, watch role-play videos, and much more.
 
Endorsements
 
The Mental Health Social Support workshop is approved by several industry Associations for continuing professional development. Current endorsements include:
  • Australian Association of Social Workers: 14 CPD hours
  • Australian College of Mental Health Nurses: 14 CPE Points
  • Australian College of Midwives: 14 MidPLUS Points
  • Australian Community Workers Association: 5 CPE Points
  • Australian Counselling Association: 28 OPD Points
  • Australian Physiotherapy Association: 14 CPD Hours
  • Australian Practice Nurses Association: 14 CPD Hours
  • Royal College of Nursing, Australia: 12.5 CNE Points
MHSS Specialties
 
Once you complete the MHSS Core program you can undertake the MHSS Specialty Programs:
  1. Aiding Addicts;
  2. Supporting those with Depression or Anxiety
  3. Supporting the Suicidal and Suicide Bereaved
  4. Supporting Challenged Families.
Book your seat at the next MHSS Workshop now and save $100.
 
If you have any queries, please contact Pedro Gondim on pedro@mhss.net.au.
 
Intocounselling
 
What is mindfulness, and what is it not?
 
You have been sitting on the cushion for what seems like an eternity, though a glance at your clock assures you that it has only been 23 minutes. Your legs are going to sleep in the cross-legged position and your back – free from supports as you were instructed to have it be – is starting to ache in the unaccustomed upright posture. 
 
A fly has been buzzing around, alternately interesting and irritating you, and you wonder why you never noticed how much traffic goes by your street outside. You must have eaten something that you are allergic to at breakfast, because your guts are steadily expanding to their fully bloated state, making you feel like you swallowed a beach ball. You notice the usual stiffness in your neck and upper spine (the pain from which motivated you to take up this unusual practice of doing nothing), and you have the most intense desire to scratch an itch in the middle of your back. All of this is in addition to your humdinger of a toothache. 
 
Welcome to the world of mindfulness, you grimly tell yourself, where every pain, irritation, and sensation, from barely there to unbearable, is brought to your earnest attention. Then you realise: oh, that’s a thought.   I’m not supposed to get carried away with thoughts. Back to noticing the itch, the toothache, the fly...
 
And yet, amidst the flux of sound, pain, and thought intrusion, you are also immersed in a novel experience: the curiously comforting sensation of stillness. It’s an odd, expanding peacefulness. Could this be what all those Eastern religious dudes are rabbiting on about?
 
Mindfulness is...
 
Although only recently embraced by Western psychology, mindfulness practices and techniques have been part of many Eastern philosophies, such as Buddhism, Taoism, Tai Chi, Hinduism, and most martial arts, for thousands of years. The various definitions of it revolve around bringing non-judgmental consciousness to the present experience, so it can be considered the art of conscious living. Mindfulness is said to be:
  1. “Bringing one’s complete attention to the present experience on a moment-to-moment basis” (Marlatt & Kristeller, 1999, p 68).
  2. “Paying attention in a particular way; on purpose, in the present moment, and nonjudgmentally” (Kabat-Zinn, 1994, p4).
  3. “Consciously bringing awareness to your here-and-now experience, with openness, interest, and receptiveness” (Harris, 2007).
Let’s note some of the important elements of these definitions. First, we can observe that mindfulness is a process of awareness, not thinking. Awareness involves noticing experience, as opposed to getting caught up in thoughts. Second, the three definitions above hint at a corollary aspect: the attitude that goes with being mindfully aware. It is not one of closed-minded pre-judging. Instead the stance is one of openness and curiosity, which induce acceptance rather than conflict or avoidance of whatever is happening. Thus, a person can be having the unpleasant experience of intense pain and yet – through mindfulness – regard that pain with curiosity and openness, as merely a sensation to be explored, rather than something to fight with or escape, say through drugs.  
 
Third, paying attention in a particular way – “on purpose” – suggests that we are able to choose what we pay attention to. When we can direct our awareness, focusing on different aspects of our experience, we are free to deeply connect with ourselves, appreciating the fullness of each moment of life. We can use the awareness to enhance our self-knowledge, and to connect more deeply with those we care about. We can use mindfulness to expand our repertory of responses to our world, thus greatly increasing our psychological resilience and life satisfaction. Dr Harris, a strong advocate of Acceptance and Commit Therapy (which uses mindfulness-based techniques), suggests that this may be why ACT has been shown to increase therapist effectiveness and reduce therapist burnout (Harris, 2009).
 
Mindfulness is not...
 
Mindfulness can be contrasted with several other philosophies or practices. CBT (Cognitive Behaviour Therapy) also involves becoming aware of one’s thoughts, but those practicing CBT are encouraged to evaluate and then dispute unhelpful thoughts, changing them to something kinder and more accurate. In mindfulness, practitioners are not generally interested in whether thoughts are true or false, but in whether it is helpful in the moment to hang on to or get caught up with them.
 
If the practitioner observes that a thought is likely to put his/her life into the “stuck and struggling” zone rather than making it fuller, richer, and more meaningful, then the practitioner agrees to let the thought come and go rather than engage with it, but there is no attempt to fight it (Harris, 2009). In recent years, mindfulness advocates have merged mindfulness with cognitive therapies, adapting Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) techniques to Cognitive Therapy for purposes of relapse prevention in addiction cases.
 
While mindfulness practices require a certain degree of calm and equanimity and although they tend to engender greater relaxation, they should not be confused with relaxation practices in some other schools of thought, which differ significantly. Mindfulness is a form of mental training intended to enhance awareness and the ability to disengage from maladaptive patterns of mind that make one vulnerable to stress responses and psychopathology. Training in mindfulness attempts to increase awareness of thoughts, emotions, and maladaptive ways of responding to stress, thereby helping practitioners learn to cope with stress in healthier, more effective ways (Bishop et al, 2004, in Shapiro et al, 2005). 
 
Clinical applications of mindfulness
 
Let’s review what some of the main clinical applications of mindfulness are.
 
Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR): Probably the most commonly-cited method of mindfulness training in the literature is MBSR. Developed in a behavioural setting for populations with chronic pain and stress-related disorders, it has typically been conducted as an 8 to 10 week course for groups of up to 30 participants who meet weekly for two to two-and-a-half hours for instruction and practice in mindfulness meditation skills, along with discussion of stress, coping, and homework assignments.
 
Instructed to practice the skills outside group meetings for at least 45 minutes per day, participants become skilled in focusing the attention on the target of observation (e.g., the breath), and through this they improve on their ability to be aware of it in each moment. When emotions, sensations, or thoughts arise, participants are instructed to observe them non-judgmentally, not becoming absorbed in their contents, returning their attention to the present moment, to the object of observation (Baer, 2003).
 
Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT): Teasdale, Segal, and Williams (1995) saw that the skills of attentional control taught in mindfulness meditation could be helpful in preventing relapse of major depressive episodes. Their theories of depressive relapse suggest that many individuals who have formerly had major depressive episodes become vulnerable to recurrences upon experiencing mild dysphoric states because these states reactivate the depressive thinking patterns present during previous episodes, thus triggering a new episode.
 
MBCT is an eight-week program based on MBSR which incorporates elements of cognitive therapy that facilitate a de-centred (defused or disidentified) view of one’s thoughts, emotions, and bodily sensations. MBCT prevents depressive relapse by showing formerly depressed individuals how to observe their thoughts and feelings non-judgmentally, viewing them simply as mental events that come and go. Thus, such clients do not escalate negative thoughts into ruminative patterns.
 
Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT): DBT is a multi-faceted approach to treating Borderline Personality Disorder which is based on a dialectical worldview. This proposes that reality consists of opposing forces, the synthesis of which leads to a new reality, which in turn consists of opposing forces, in a continual process of change. Participants in such therapy are mostly concerned with the dialectic between acceptance and change. Clients are encouraged to accept themselves, their histories, and their situations as they are, while working to change their behaviours and environments to create a better life.
 
Synthesising this apparent contradiction is a central goal of DBT, and mindfulness skills are taught within this context. While the concepts taught (e.g., nonjudgmental observation of thoughts, emotions, and sensations) are similar to MBSR, they are organised differently. The course is a year-long weekly skills group. Some highly impaired participants are unable to meditate as extensively as the MBSR courses require, so the DBT version does not prescribe a specific amount of time to be set aside for the practice, leaving this to be determined by participants’ individual therapists (Baer, 2003).
 
Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT): Theoretically based in contemporary behaviour analysis, ACT does not describe its treatment methods in terms of mindfulness or meditation, but is included here because its strategies are consistent with the mindfulness approaches described. Participants in ACT are taught to develop an Observing Self capable of watching their bodily sensations, emotions, and thoughts.
 
They are encouraged to see these as separate from themselves, the person experiencing them. Thus the thought “I’m greedy” would be transformed into “I’m having the thought that I’m greedy”. ACT students are explicitly taught to abandon any attempts to control thoughts and feelings, instead merely observing them non-judgmentally, accepting them as they are, while changing their behaviour in constructive ways to improve their lives (Hayes, 1994).
 
Relapse prevention: This is a cognitive-behavioural treatment package designed to forestall relapses in individuals treated for substance abuse. Mindfulness skills are taught as part of it to help participants cope with urges to use. Mindfulness involves acceptance of the constantly changing experiences of the present moment, whereas addiction is an inability to accept the present moment as the next “high” associated with the addiction is sought. 
 
Participants are taught to “urge surf”: that is, to “ride” the urge to use like a wave, knowing that the wave will build, crest, and subside. The client knows that he or she is not “home free” when that happens, as there will always be more waves; the urges cannot be eliminated. Thus they must be accepted as normal responses to appetitive cues. Mindfulness skills enable such clients to observe the urges as they appear, accept them non-judgmentally, and cope with them in adaptive ways (Baer, 2003).
 
This article was adapted from the upcoming Mental Health Academy CPD course “Mindfulness in Therapeutic Practice”. For more information, visit www.mentalhealthacademy.com.au.  
 
References:
 
Baer, R. (2003). Mindfulness training as a clinical intervention: A conceptual and empirical review. American Psychological Association: 10(2), 125-143.
 
Harris, R. (2007).The happiness trap: stop struggling, start living. Wollombi, NSW, Australia: Exisle Publishing, Ltd.
 
Harris, R. (2009). Mindfulness without meditation. In HCPJ (Healthcare Counselling and Psychology Journal), October, 2009, pp 21 - 24.
 
Kabat-Zinn, J. (1994). Wherever you go, there you are: Mindfulness meditation in everyday life. New York: Hyperion.
 
Marlatt, G. A., & Kristeller, J. L. (1999). Mindfulness and meditation. In W. R. Miller (Ed.), Integrating spirituality into treatment (pp. 67-84). Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association.
 
Shapiro, S.L., Astin, J.A., Bishop, S.R., & Cordova, M. (2005). Mindfulness-based stress reduction for health care professionals: results from a randomised trial. International Journal of Stress Management, 12 (2), 164-176. 
 
Teasdale, J.D., Segal, Z.V., & Williams, M.G. (1995). How does cognitive therapy prevent depressive relapse and why should attentional control (mindfulness training) help? Behaviour Research and Therapy, 33, 25-39.
 
Join our community:
 
 
 
 
Help those around you suffering mental illness in silence: www.mhss.net.au
 
Intobookstore
 
The Institute has a list of recommended textbooks and DVDs that can add great value to your learning journey - and the good news is that you can purchase them very easily. The AIPC bookstore will give you discounted prices, an easy ordering method and quality guarantee!
 
This fortnight's feature is...
 
Name: Putting together Your Own Life: A workbook for you to manage recovery
Authors: Francess Day
AIPC Code: DAY2
AIPC Price: $50.00 (RRP $62.50)
ISBN: 0-9580102-0-X
 
This will provide an invaluable aid for survivors of all forms of trauma who courageously choose to move beyond their pain and suffering in the quest to rebuild their lives. This workbook is a logical extension to assisting trauma survivors.
 
To order this book, contact your Student Support Centre or the AIPC Head Office (1800 657 667).
 
Intoarticles
 
Helping Families Enhance Resilience: Creating supportive contexts
 
While we have been advocating strategies which consolidate struggling families’ security and shore up members’ sense of belonging and self-esteem, there is another level. Remember Maslow’s hierarchy of needs (1968)? Maslow noted that, once people met relatively basic needs, they involved themselves in meeting higher needs: ones that Maslow referred to as needs for self-actualisation. Flourishing families do this naturally. In such families, happy experiences are abundant, and they tend to spring from a home ambiance which not only protects and strengthens, but also nurtures and encourages its members.
 
Such an environment is especially important to a resilient family during troubled times. They develop and maintain it through celebrations and fun, allowing for private time and space, creating family time and enhanced relationships, learning to negotiate and compromise, practicing kindness, and attending to the need for meaning and purpose. Before we embark on those discussions, however, there is one standout point for you as support person: the issue of physical safety.
 
Click here to continue reading this article.
 
 
The Opening Micro-skills
 
“First impressions stick.” “You never get a second chance to make a first impression.” If there is any truth in these two popular notions, then anyone working with a helpee (e.g. a therapy client, a friend, a family member, etc.) within the context of providing mental health support should not underestimate the usefulness and importance of opening micro-skills.
 
Appropriate use of non-verbal micro-skills tells care recipients that you are with them and ready to listen. When you use opening micro-skills, you are inviting them to tell you more. While these are technically commands, they are “soft” ones, in that they are presented to the helpee in a manner that communicates, “It is okay to decline”. They help to create comfort in the helpee because they foster the courage to confide. The purpose of openers is to encourage disclosure without dominating the conversation. There are two broad categories of these skills: “encouragers”, such as “door openers” and “minimal encouragers”, and questions. First we consider the encouragers.
 
Click here to continue reading this article.
 
Other articles: www.aipc.net.au/articles
 
Intodevelopment
 
Mental Health Academy – First to Knowledge in Mental Health
 
Get UNLIMITED access to over 50 Hours ($3,160.00 value) of personal & professional development video workshops, and over 80 specialist courses, for just $39/month or $349/year.
 
We want you to experience unlimited, unrestricted access to the largest repository of personal and professional development programs available anywhere in the country.
 
When you join our new Premium Level membership, you’ll get all-inclusive access to over 40 video workshops (presented by some of the world’s leading mental health experts) valued at $3,160.00.
 
You’ll also get access to over 80 professionally-developed courses exploring a huge range of topics, including counselling interventions, communications skills, conflict, child development, mental health disorders, stress and trauma, relationships, ethics, reflective practice, plus much more. 
 
All courses and videos have been specially developed by psychologist and counsellor educators and are conveniently accessible online, 24/7. They’re filled with content that’ll help you understand your own life, and how to improve on your current condition.
 
Benefits of becoming a premium member:
  • Unlimited access to over 80 specialist courses
  • Unlimited access to over 40 videos ($3,160.00 value)
  • Videos presented by international experts
  • New programs released every month
  • Extremely relevant topics
  • Online, 24/7 access
  • Counsellors: Over 200 hours of ACA-approved OPD
  • Social Workers: 126 AASW-endorsed CPD programs
  • Psychologists: Over 200 'active' CPD Hours
Recently released and upcoming programs:
  • Brief Counselling: The Basic Skills
  • Counselling Children: Brief Strategies
  • Overview of Principal Personality Tests
  • Understanding the MBTI
  • Group Microskills: Encountering Diversity
  • Family Therapy: Universal and Unique Approaches to Solving Problems
  • Coaching and Microcounseling
  • Sitting with Shadow (coming soon)
  • Client, Meet Your Shadow (coming soon)
  • Transference and Projection (coming soon)
  • Understanding Obsessives (coming soon)
  • OCD and OCPD Case Studies (coming soon)
  • Mindfulness in Therapeutic Practice (Coming Soon)
  • Managing Chronic Pain (Coming Soon)
  • Basic Stress Management (coming soon)
Learn more and join today: www.mentalhealthacademy.com.au/premium
 
Intoconnection
 
Have you visited theCounselling Connection Blog yet? There are over 600 interesting posts including case studies, profiles, success stories, videos and much more. Make sure you too get connected (and thank you for those who have already submitted comments and suggestions).
 
Supporting families dealing with parental mental illness
 
Coordinated by MHPN, this is the full recording, including all seven chapters in the webinar Working together, working better to support families dealing with parental mental illness. The webinar includes mental health professionals located around Australia involved in an interdisciplinary panel discussion.
 
This webinar featured: Emeritus Professor Dorothy Scott, Dr Cate Howell, Mr John Clark, Dr Nick Kowalenko and Dr Michael Murray.
 
Click here to read the full post.
 
 
Professor Windy Dryden on REBT
 
Professor Windy Dryden, author of nearly 200 books, discusses how his journey through the world of psychology led to his enthusiastic adoption of the precepts and practice of REBT. REBT is one of the most thoroughly researched and widely used therapeutic approaches in the UK today, and has also been called ‘applied philosophy’ for its use of the teachings of ancient philosophers. Learn about REBT from the UK’s most respected proponent, prolific author Windy Dryden.
 
Click here to read the full post.
 
Get new posts delivered by email! Visit our FeedBurner subscription page and click the link on the subscription box.
 
 
Intotwitter
 
Follow us on Twitter and get the latest and greatest in counselling news. To follow, visit http://twitter.com/counsellingnews and click "Follow".
 
Featured Tweets
 
Helping Families Enhance Resilience: Supporting a positive self-concept: http://bit.ly/18iLZV1
 
Irregular Bedtimes Reduce Children’s Cognitive Performance: http://bit.ly/18XnCM9
 
The Rehabilitation of an Old Emotion: A New Science of Nostalgia: http://bit.ly/18iM0s2
 
Instead of responding to the pain of envy with efforts to bolster your self-esteem, try self-compassion instead. http://bit.ly/1bBqUUM
 
Be thankful you weren't born in the 1600s. A quick glance at the history of abnormal psychology: http://bit.ly/1beZmFW
 
Helping clients reach collaborative conflict solutions in the workplace: http://bit.ly/18XnL26
 
Creating a Buzz in the Brain to Spread Ideas: http://psych.ly/1a5ugOa
 
Note that you need a Twitter profile to follow a list. If you do not have one yet, visit http://twitter.com to create a free profile today!
 
Tweet Count: 4,108
Follower Count: 5,934
 
Intoquotes
 
"In today’s rush we all think too much – seek too much – want too much – and forget about the joy of just being."
 
~ Eckhart Tolle
 
Intoseminars
 
Many students of the Diploma of Counselling attend seminars to complete the practical requirements of their course. Seminars provide an ideal opportunity to network with other students and liaise with qualified counselling professionals in conjunction with completing compulsory coursework.
 
Not sure if you need to attend Seminars? Click here for information on Practical Assessments.
 
Below are upcoming seminars available during the remainder of 2013.
 
To register for a seminar, please contact your Student Support Centre.
 
BRISBANE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 10/08, 12/10, 07/12
Communication Skills II - 27/07, 28/09, 23/11
The Counselling Process - 31/08-01/09, 30/11-01/12
Counselling Therapies I - 21-22/09, 16-17/11
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/07, 19-20/10, 14-15/12
Case Management - 24-25/08, 02-03/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 06/10
Counselling Applications - 09/11
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 31/08-01/09, 30/11-01/12
Communication Skills I - 10/08, 12/10, 07/12
Communication Skills II - 27/07, 28/09, 23/11
Counselling Therapies I - 21-22/09, 16-17/11
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/07, 19-20/10, 14-15/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 08/09, 24/11
Family Therapy - 29/09, 08/12
 
GOLD COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 17/08, 16/11
Communication Skills II - 21/09, 13/12
The Counselling Process - 19-20/07, 25-26/10, 07/12
Counselling Therapies I - 27-28/09
Counselling Therapies II - 22-23/11
Case Management - 18-19/10
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 02/08
Counselling Applications - 16/08
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 19-20/07, 25-26/10, 07/12
Communication Skills I - 17/08, 16/11
Communication Skills II - 21/09, 13/12
Counselling Therapies I - 27-28/09
Counselling Therapies II - 22-23/11
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 29/11
Family Therapy - 16/08
Case Management - 18-19/10
 
MELBOURNE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 27/07, 31/08, 28/09, 12/10, 23/11, 14/12
Communication Skills II - 28/07, 01/09, 13/10, 24/11, 15/12
The Counselling Process - 20-21/07 17-18/08, 13-14/09, 05-06/10, 16-17/11 06-07/12
Counselling Therapies I - 20-21/07, 03-04/08, 21-22/09, 19-20/10, 30/11-01/12
Counselling Therapies II - 10-11/08, 07-08/09, 26-27/10, 07-08/12
Case Management - 10-11/08, 04-05/10, 14-15/12
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 25/08, 20/09, 09/11
Counselling Applications - 29/09, 10/11
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 20-21/07 17-18/08, 13-14/09, 05-06/10, 16-17/11 06-07/12
Communication Skills I - 27/07, 31/08, 28/09, 12/10, 23/11, 14/12
Communication Skills II - 28/07, 01/09, 13/10, 24/11, 15/12
Counselling Therapies I - 20-21/07, 03-04/08, 21-22/09, 19-20/10, 30/11-01/12
Counselling Therapies II - 10-11/08, 07-08/09, 26-27/10, 07-08/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 15/09, 02/11
Family Therapy - 24/08, 08/11
Case Management - 10-11/08, 04-05/10, 14-15/12
 
NORTHERN TERRITORY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 10/08, 02/11
Communication Skills II - 07/11, 30/11
The Counselling Process - 28-29/09, 07-08/12
Counselling Therapies I - 20-21/07, 26-27/10
Counselling Therapies II - 24-25/08, 14-15/12
Case Management - 23-24/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 12/10
Counselling Applications - 17/08, 09/11
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 28-29/09, 07-08/12
Communication Skills I - 10/08, 02/11
Communication Skills II - 07/11, 30/11
Counselling Therapies I - 20-21/07, 26-27/10
Counselling Therapies II - 24-25/08, 14-15/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 19/10
Family Therapy - 27-28/07, 16/11
Counselling Applications - 17/08, 09/11
 
SOUTH AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 24/08, 26/10, 14/12
Communication Skills II - 25/08, 27/10, 15/12
The Counselling Process - 03-04/08, 19-20/10, 30/11-01/12
Counselling Therapies I - 21-22/09
Counselling Therapies II - 17-18/08, 23-24/11
Case Management - 31/08-01/09, 07-08/12
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 14/09
Counselling Applications - 27/07, 12/10
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 03-04/08, 19-20/10, 30/11-01/12
Communication Skills I - 24/08, 26/10, 14/12
Communication Skills II - 25/08, 27/10, 15/12
Counselling Therapies I - 21-22/09
Counselling Therapies II - 17-18/08, 23-24/11
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 28/07, 13/10
Family Therapy - 15/09
Case Management - 31/08-01/09, 07-08/12
 
SUNSHINE COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 10/08, 16/11
Communication Skills II - 11/08, 17/11
The Counselling Process - 21-22/09
Counselling Therapies I - 27-28/07
Counselling Therapies II - 19-20/10
Case Management - 28-29/09
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 12/10
Counselling Applications - 02/11
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 21-22/09
Communication Skills I - 10/08, 16/11
Communication Skills II - 11/08, 17/11
Counselling Therapies I - 27-28/07
Counselling Therapies II - 19-20/10
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 24/08
Family Therapy - 07/09
Case Management - 28-29/09
 
SYDNEY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 29/07, 24/08, 16/09, 18/10, 09/11, 13/12
Communication Skills II - 30/07, 26/08, 17/09, 19/10, 18/11, 16/12
The Counselling Process - 01-02/08, 22-23/08, 13-14/09, 03-04/10, 14-15/11, 06-07/12
Counselling Therapies I - 19-20/07, 19-20/09, 22-23/11
Counselling Therapies II - 15-16/08, 08-09/10, 09-10/12
Case Management - 26-27/07, 14-15/10, 17-18/12
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 05/09, 25/11
Counselling Applications - 06/09, 26/11
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 01-02/08, 22-23/08, 13-14/09, 03-04/10, 14-15/11, 06-07/12
Communication Skills I - 29/07, 24/08, 16/09, 18/10, 09/11, 13/12
Communication Skills II - 30/07, 26/08, 17/09, 19/10, 18/11, 16/12
Counselling Therapies I - 19-20/07, 19-20/09, 22-23/11
Counselling Therapies II - 15-16/08, 08-09/10, 09-10/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 27/09, 27/11
Family Therapy - 28/09, 12/12
Case Management - 26-27/07, 14-15/10, 17-18/12
 
TASMANIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 04/08, 03/11
Communication Skills II - 01/09, 01/12
The Counselling Process - 28-29/09, 07-08/12
Counselling Therapies I - 28-29/09, 07-08/12
Counselling Therapies II - 24-25/08, 14-15/12
Case Management - 23-24/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 13/10
Counselling Applications - 18/08, 10/11
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 28-29/09, 07-08/12
Communication Skills I - 04/08, 03/11
Communication Skills II - 01/09, 01/12
Counselling Therapies I - 28-29/09, 07-08/12
Counselling Therapies II - 24-25/08, 14-15/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 21/07, 20/10
Family Therapy - 11/08, 17/11
Case Management - 23-24/11
 
WESTERN AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 03/08, 14/09, 26/10, 07/12
Communication Skills II - 04/08, 15/09, 27/10, 08/12
The Counselling Process - 07-08/09, 05-06/10, 02-03/11
Counselling Therapies I - 28-29/09, 23-24/11
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/07, 21-22/09 14-15/12
Case Management - 24-25/08, 09-10/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 12/10
Counselling Applications - 11/08, 16/11
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 07-08/09, 05-06/10, 02-03/11
Communication Skills I - 03/08, 14/09, 26/10, 07/12
Communication Skills II - 04/08, 15/09, 27/10, 08/12
Counselling Therapies I - 28-29/09, 23-24/11
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/07, 21-22/09 14-15/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 31/08, 13/10
Family Therapy - 10/08, 17/11
Case Management - 24-25/08, 09-10/11
 
Important Note: Advertising of the dates above does not guarantee availability of places in the seminar. Please check availability with the respective Student Support Centre.
 
 
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