In this Issue

Hello!
Intobachelor
Intothediploma
Intomhss
Intocounselling
Intobookstore
Intoarticles
Intodevelopment
Intoconnection
Intotwitter
Intoquotes
Intoseminars

Contact us

Publications

Editor: Sandra Poletto
Email: ezine@aipc.net.au
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Copyright: 2012 Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors

Hello!
Welcome to Edition 183 of Institute Inbrief. Question: What is the biggest killer of Australians today? If you are somewhat clued up about health matters, you may very well say, “Oh, definitely heart disease.” Or you may argue that that unenviable honour goes to cancer. But the answer which we discuss in this edition’s featured article may be a little more complex than you think.
 
Also in this edition:
  • Bachelor programs: Mid-year intake closes this week
  • MHSS Workshops – July/August
  • Articles and CPD updates
  • Blog and Twitter updates
  • Upcoming seminar dates
Book sale: We are selling a range of counselling and psychology books at discounted prices via the Bookon marketplace: http://bookon.com.au/Sellers/aipcsso/. Stocks are very limited - it's first in, first served. Check out the available titles and let your friends know before stocks run out!
 
Enjoy your reading,
 
Editor.
 
 
Join our community:
 
 
 
 
Intobachelor
 
MID-YEAR INTAKE – CLOSING THIS WEEK
 
Bachelor of Counselling &
Bachelor of Psychological Science
 
Semester 2 for the Bachelor of Counselling and Bachelor of Psychological Science starts 22 July. We have a few places remaining at the Brisbane, Sydney and Melbourne campuses.
 
This week is your last opportunity to enrol. Applications cannot be accepted after 5pm, Friday. So please submit your application now.
 
You can do that here now:
 
Bachelor of Counselling: www.aipc.net.au/degree
 
Bachelor of Psychological Science: www.aip.edu.au/degree
 
If you have any questions whatsoever, give us a call on:
 
Brisbane: 1800-353-643
Sydney: 1800-677-697
Melbourne: 1800-622-489
Adelaide: 1800-246-324
Perth: 1800-246-381
 
It’s not too late – but you must act now.
 
Intothediploma
 
Imagine Being Passionate About Your Work
And Assisting People Every Day Lead Better Lives
 
 
It’s rare these days to hear people talk about their work with true passion. You hear so many stories of people working to pay the bills; putting up with imperfect situations; and compromising on their true desires.
 
That’s why it’s always so refreshing to hear regular stories from graduates living their dream to be a Counsellor. They’re always so full of energy, enthusiasm and passion. There’s no doubt that counselling is one of the most personally rewarding and enriching professions.
 
Just imagine someone comes to you for assistance. They’re emotionally paralysed by events in their life. They can’t even see a future for themselves. They can only focus on their pain and grief. The despair is so acute it pervades their entire life. Their relationship is breaking down and heading towards a divorce. They can’t focus on work and are getting in trouble with their boss. They feel they should be able to handle their problems alone, but know they can’t. It makes them feel helpless, worthless. Their self-esteem has never been lower. They’re caught in a cycle of destruction and pain.
 
Now imagine you have the knowledge and skills to help this person overcome their challenges. You assist to relieve their intense emotional pain. You give them hope for the future. You assist to rebuild their self-esteem and lead a satisfying, empowered life.
 
As a Counsellor you can experience these personal victories every day. And it’s truly enriching. There is nothing more fulfilling than helping another person overcome seemingly impossible obstacles.
 
Learn more here: www.aipc.net.au/lz
 
Intomhss
 
Australia is suffering a Mental Health Crisis
 
Our suicide rate is now TWICE our road toll. Many suicides could possibly be averted, if only the people close to the victim were able to identify the early signs and appropriately intervene.
 
RIGHT NOW someone you care about – a family member, friend, or colleague – may be suffering in silence, and you don’t know.
 
With the right training, you can help that family member, friend or colleague.
 
Save $100 when you book your seat in an upcoming MHSS Workshop.
 
Upcoming workshops in July/August:
  • Launceston, TAS: 11 & 12 July
  • Gold Coast, QLD: 13 & 14 July
  • East Doncaster, VIC: 18 & 19 July
  • Glandore, SA: 20 & 21 July
  • Gold Coast, QLD: 27 & 28 July
  • Coffs Harbour, NSW: 31 July & 1 August
  • Lavington (Albury Wodonga), NSW: 6 & 7 August
  • Gold Coast, QLD: 10 & 11 August
  • Launceston, TAS: 15 & 16 August
  • Narre Warren, VIC: 15 & 16 August
  • Gold Coast, QLD: 24 & 25 August
  • Glandore, SA: 31 August & 1 September
Book your seat now: www.mhss.net.au/find-a-course
 
Your registration includes the 2-day facilitated workshop; a hardcopy of the MHSS Student Workbook; and access to an online dashboard where you can obtain your certificate, watch role-play videos, and much more.
 
Endorsements
 
The Mental Health Social Support workshop is approved by several industry Associations for continuing professional development. Current endorsements include:
  • Australian Association of Social Workers: 14 CPD hours
  • Australian College of Mental Health Nurses: 14 CPE Points
  • Australian College of Midwives: 14 MidPLUS Points
  • Australian Community Workers Association: 5 CPE Points
  • Australian Counselling Association: 28 OPD Points
  • Australian Physiotherapy Association: 14 CPD Hours
  • Australian Practice Nurses Association: 14 CPD Hours
  • Royal College of Nursing, Australia: 12.5 CNE Points
MHSS Specialties
 
Once you complete the MHSS Core program you can undertake the MHSS Specialty Programs:
  1. Aiding Addicts;
  2. Supporting those with Depression or Anxiety
  3. Supporting the Suicidal and Suicide Bereaved
  4. Supporting Challenged Families.
Book your seat at the next MHSS Workshop now and save $100.
 
If you have any queries, please contact Pedro Gondim on pedro@mhss.net.au.
 
Intocounselling
 
Addiction: The Biggest Killer
 
Question: What is the biggest killer of Australians today?
 
If you are somewhat clued up about health matters, you may very well say, “Oh, definitely heart disease.” Or you may argue that that unenviable honour goes to cancer. Indeed, here are some statistics which would seem to validate your claim:
  1. The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) reported in 2011 that heart disease is the biggest killer, causing over 50,000 deaths a year, or 34 per cent of all deaths in 2008.
  2. The report said that that was followed by cancer, at 29 per cent of all deaths in 2008 (Mandal, A, 2011).
  3. The largest contributor to premature death in the 2002 AIHW report was heart disease, at 96,000 person-years of life lost (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2002).
  4. Heart disease is the most expensive illness to treat, costing about $5.9 billion in the financial year of 2004-2005, with over half that money being spent on patients admitted to hospital. The disease was responsible for 475,000 hospital admissions and played a secondary role in 797,000 admissions in 2007-2008.
These statistics would seem to suggest that you are correct, with no argument possible; it seems to be a matter of “case closed”.
 
But wait just a minute. Situations, especially in the field of health, are not always as simple and straightforward as they seem. According to the Burden of Disease and Injury in Australia, the most recent estimates are that over one-fifth of cardiovascular disease (21.3 per cent) and colorectal, breast, uterine and kidney cancer (20.5 per cent) are caused by obesity, which also causes nearly one-fourth of type 2 diabetes (at 23.8 per cent) and osteoarthritis (24.5 per cent). These figures do not include the impact on reproductive systems, mental health, bone deterioration, or sleep apnoea, which are also largely affected by obesity. The overall cost of obesity to Australian society and governments was $58.2 billion in 2008 alone (Preventative Health Taskforce, 2008).
 
“Ok,” you say, “obesity may have caused a good chunk of disease, but this is supposed to be an article on addiction. What have all these statistics got to do with that?”
 
Addiction at the base of it
 
Ah, good question. Going back one step further in the chain of causation, we find an alarmingly strong correlation between obesity and food addiction, also known as compulsive overeating. There is accumulating evidence to show how neural and hormonal pathways are shared by both substance abuse and food addiction. Many of the brain changes reported for compulsive overeating and obesity are also seen in various forms of addictions.
 
Most importantly, overeating and obesity may have an acquired drive like drug addiction with respect to motivation and incentive (Hyman, M., 2011; Obesity and Food Addiction Summit, 2009; Liu, Y., von Deneen, K.M., Kobeissy, F.H., & Gold, M.S., 2010). Put in simple terms, the obesity that engenders so much health misery appears to be spawned largely by addiction. Thus, reviewing that chain in a forward direction, we see that eating certain refined foods can cause the brain changes that create the food addiction, which creates the obesity, which in turn gives rise to the heart disease, cancer, diabetes and other health problems that kill Australians.
 
We can show a similar pathway for alcohol and drug addiction, which, like obesity, gives impetus to cardiovascular disease, cancer, and other health issues, and costs our community dearly in other ways as well. According to some estimates a combined $30 billion was spent or lost in 2010 on health care, lost productivity, premature death, crime and auto accidents related to alcohol and drug abuse alone. Roughly 75 per cent of all that money was paid for by public sources, which means Australian taxpayers footed three quarters of the bill. With some 12 million taxpayers in Australia the average sum paid by each individual taxpayer just for drug and alcohol addiction amounted to approximately $2,500 (Mittiga, R., 2011).
 
Thus, as Martin, Weinberg, and Bealer (2007) explain, it is addiction at the base of the problems, providing the behavioural underpinnings not only for obesity, but also for many of the other common “lifestyle-related” diseases. This leads to their assertion that addiction is actually the number one health problem, and that this is the most widespread and costly of all illnesses. Let’s look at facts arising from some of the common addictions that Australians deal with.
 
Alcohol addiction
 
Australia has a well-established drinking culture, where everything -- from sporting events to births, marriages, graduations, and new jobs -- is celebrated with a drink, or several. Thus it should be no surprise that the average Australian consumes over nine litres of pure alcohol annually, putting Australia in the top 30 countries for alcohol consumption, behind France, the United Kingdom, Ireland and Germany (Drug and Alcohol Rehab Asia (DARA), 2011).
  • Over 3000 deaths per years are attributed to excessive consumption of alcohol in Australia.
  • Over 5000 (5 per cent) of all cancers are due to chronic, long-term abuse of alcohol. Alcoholism is a factor in the development of liver, breast, and oesophageal cancer, among others.
  • Excessive alcohol consumption is the cause of up to 81,000 hospitalisations annually.
  • The cost of alcohol on the Australian community between 2004 and 2005 was estimated to be up to $15 billion.
  • The Alcohol Consumption in Australia: Snapshot, 2004-05 report (Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2006) stated that one in nine Australians drank at risky or high-risk levels.
  • Half of men and one third of women reported binge drinking, with 12 per cent of men and 4 per cent of women stating that they had done so in the last week.
  • About 15 per cent of Indigenous Australians drank at risky or high-risk levels.
  • About 8 per cent of drinkers reported that they consumed alcohol daily, and 40 per cent drank on a weekly basis (DARA, 2011; Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2006).
Drug addiction
 
While Australia’s proportion of people who have used drugs (40 per cent) is small compared to some countries, the impact is felt widely. The Drugs in Australia 2010 Report (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2011) tells us that:
  • Nearly 15 per cent of all Australians aged 14 years and over had used a drug in the 12 months prior to the report. Of those,
    • 10 per cent had used cannabis (other drugs were used by 3 per cent or fewer of users).
    • Eight per cent of Australians have had a drug addiction problem (this estimate excludes alcohol).
  • Of drug users, about 47 per cent had used prescription drugs for non-medical purposes more than once in the previous month.
  • In 1997, there were over 70,000 heroin addicts in Australia (it is predicted that this number would have been higher were it not for Australia’s geography as an island nation, combined with effective policing).
Gambling addiction
 
Then there is gambling. The Productivity Commission released a report in 1999 which attempted to quantify the costs and benefits of gambling in Australia. Some of the report’s key findings were that:
  • Over 80 per cent of Australians gambled in the last year – losing around $11.3 billion, with 40 per cent gambling regularly.
  • Problem gamblers represent over 290,000 people, or 2.1 per cent of Australian adults.
  • Problem gamblers comprise 15 per cent of regular (non-lottery) gamblers and account for about $3.5 billion in expenditure annually — about one-third of the gambling industries’ market.
  • Problem gamblers lose on average around $12,000 each per year, compared with just under $650 for other gamblers (Productivity Commission, 1999).
These figures, of course, only represent the financial losses. The report also concluded that gambling addictions had adverse effects on the personal, legal, interpersonal, community services, and work/study aspects of respondents’ lives.
 
In addition to compulsive overeating, substance abuse, and problem gambling, people get caught in behavioural addictions such as hypersexuality, spending, video game-playing, and others. Regardless of the behaviour that is being done to excess, there are two common threads: The person is out of control, and cannot stop seeking the substance or performing the behaviour; and the behaviour is self-destructive.
 
This article was adapted from the Mental Health Social Support Specialty Course “Aiding Addicts”. For more information, visit www.mhss.net.au.
 
References:
 
Australian Bureau of Statistics. (2006). Report 4832.0.55.001. Alcohol consumption in Australia: A snapshot, 2004-05. Australian Bureau of Statistics. Retrieved on 1 May, 2012 from: http://bit.ly/W75l7H
 
Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. (2011). Drugs in Australia 2010: tobacco, alcohol and other drugs. Australian Policy Online © apo.org.au 2011. Retrieved on 7 May, 2012 from: http://bit.ly/WLupOL
 
Drug and Alcohol Rehab Asia (DARA). (2011). Alcoholism in Australia. Drug and Alcohol Rehab Asia. Retrieved on 1 May, 2012, from: http://bit.ly/VIF54A.
 
Hyman, M. (2011). Food addiction: Could it explain why 70 per cent of America is fat? Dr Hyman.com. Retrieved on 7 May, 2012, from: http://bit.ly/109MTLw
 
Liu, Y., von Deneed, K.M., Kobeissy, F.H., & Gold, M.S. (2010). Food addiction and obesity: evidence from bench to bedside. J Psychoactive Drugs. 2010 Jun; 42(2):133-45. Retrieved on 7 May, 2012, from: http://1.usa.gov/WvW6Ai
 
Mandal, A. (2011). Heart disease: The largest killer in Australia. Medical Condition News. Retrieved on 1/5/12 from: http://bit.ly/109N35t
 
Martin, P.R., Weinberg, B.A., & Bealer, B.K. (2007). Healing addiction: An integrated pharmacopsychosocial approach to treatment. Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
 
Mittiga, R. (30 January, 2011). Effects of gambling addiction: Australia. Addiction treatment Australia: the GATS Program. Retrieved on 1/5/12 from: http://bit.ly/13I4Llw.
 
Obesity and Food Addiction Summit. (2009). Food addiction: What is food addiction? Retrieved on 7 May, 2012 from: http://bit.ly/WV5JJm
 
Preventative Health Taskforce. (2008). Technical Paper 1: Obesity in Australia: a need for urgent action. Preventative Health Taskforce 2.1: Health, social and economic impact of obesity. Retrieved on 1 May, 2012 from: http://bit.ly/WV5MEX
 
Productivity Commission. (1999). Australia’s Gambling Industries, Report No 10, AusInfo, Canberra. Retrieved on 1 May, 2012 from: http://bit.ly/XSI1Kk
 
Join our community:
 
 
 
 
Help those around you suffering mental illness in silence: www.mhss.net.au
 
Intobookstore
 
The Institute has a list of recommended textbooks and DVDs that can add great value to your learning journey - and the good news is that you can purchase them very easily. The AIPC bookstore will give you discounted prices, an easy ordering method and quality guarantee!
 
This fortnight's feature is...
 
Name: Putting together the pieces: Recovering & rebuilding life after trauma
Authors: Francess Day
AIPC Code: DAY
AIPC Price: $45.00 (RRP $59.25)
ISBN: 0-9580102-0-X
 
This is an important book which will greatly assist other victims of crime and trauma to confront their fears. It is written in a way that will give both moral and practical support to victims and their families.
 
To order this book, contact your Student Support Centreor the AIPC Head Office (1800 657 667).
 
Intoarticles
 
Working with Loss and Grief in children
 
The death of a loved one is always difficult. For children, the death of a loved one can affect their sense of security. Like adults, children express loss by grieving and yet children may not demonstrate their grief openly as adults. Grief may affect their behaviour, the way in which they take in information, and their need for support. This will depend on the child, their age, and their emotional maturity. It will also depend on who the child has lost to death.
 
A child’s experience of grief varies depending on the type of loss and the developmental stage of the child. For example, moving to a new town may precipitate a grief response that is mild and transient, while grief from the loss of a parent most likely threaten the foundation of the child’s world. Young children express grief in vastly different ways from teens and adults.
 
Click here to continue reading this article.
 
 
Trends and Statistics of the Contemporary Family
 
If the family is society’s “fundamental unit”, what are some of the emergent trends and statistical truths about the unit in these times of accelerated change? If one of our goals, as counsellors, is to assist families in the crisis of transition, we must understand the changes and concomitant stressors that accompany the new forms. In this article, we look at some trends and statistics of the “contemporary family”.
 
Click here to continue reading this article.
 
Other articles: www.aipc.net.au/articles
 
Intodevelopment
 
Mental Health Academy – First to Knowledge in Mental Health
 
Get UNLIMITED access to over 50 Hours ($3,160.00 value) of personal & professional development video workshops, and over 80 specialist courses, for just $39/month or $349/year.
 
We want you to experience unlimited, unrestricted access to the largest repository of personal and professional development programs available anywhere in the country.
 
When you join our new Premium Level membership, you’ll get all-inclusive access to over 40 video workshops (presented by some of the world’s leading mental health experts) valued at $3,160.00.
 
You’ll also get access to over 80 professionally-developed courses exploring a huge range of topics, including counselling interventions, communications skills, conflict, child development, mental health disorders, stress and trauma, relationships, ethics, reflective practice, plus much more. 
 
All courses and videos have been specially developed by psychologist and counsellor educators and are conveniently accessible online, 24/7. They’re filled with content that’ll help you understand your own life, and how to improve on your current condition.
 
Benefits of becoming a premium member:
  • Unlimited access to over 80 specialist courses
  • Unlimited access to over 40 videos ($3,160.00 value)
  • Videos presented by international experts
  • New programs released every month
  • Extremely relevant topics
  • Online, 24/7 access
  • Counsellors: Over 200 hours of ACA-approved OPD
  • Social Workers: 126 AASW-endorsed CPD programs
  • Psychologists: Over 200 'active' CPD Hours
Recently released and upcoming programs:
  • Brief Counselling: The Basic Skills
  • Counselling Children: Brief Strategies
  • Overview of Principal Personality Tests
  • Understanding the MBTI
  • Group Microskills: Encountering Diversity
  • Family Therapy: Universal and Unique Approaches to Solving Problems
  • Sitting with Shadow (coming soon)
  • Client, Meet Your Shadow (coming soon)
  • Transference and Projection (coming soon)
  • Understanding Obsessives (coming soon)
  • OCD and OCPD Case Studies (coming soon)
  • Mindfulness (Coming Soon)
  • Managing Chronic Pain (Coming Soon)
  • Basic Stress Management (coming soon)
  • Coaching and Microcounselling (coming soon)
Learn more and join today: www.mentalhealthacademy.com.au/premium
 
Intoconnection
 
Have you visited the Counselling Connection Blog yet? There are over 600 interesting posts including case studies, profiles, success stories, videos and much more. Make sure you too get connected (and thank you for those who have already submitted comments and suggestions).
 
An Integrative Approach to Anxiety
 
This series of video lectures produced by AIPC and presented by Dr Clive Jones (Dipt, DipCouns, BEd, MEd, GradDipPsych, PhD (psych), MAPS) aim to give you an understanding of an integrative approach to treating anxiety. The series includes role-plays to demonstrate some of the concepts.
 
Click here to read the full post.
 
 
Professor Windy Dryden on REBT
 
Professor Windy Dryden, author of nearly 200 books, discusses how his journey through the world of psychology led to his enthusiastic adoption of the precepts and practice of REBT. REBT is one of the most thoroughly researched and widely used therapeutic approaches in the UK today, and has also been called ‘applied philosophy’ for its use of the teachings of ancient philosophers. Learn about REBT from the UK’s most respected proponent, prolific author Windy Dryden.
 
Click here to read the full post.
 
Get new posts delivered by email! Visit our FeedBurner subscription page and click the link on the subscription box.
 
 
Intotwitter
 
Follow us on Twitter and get the latest and greatest in counselling news. To follow, visit http://twitter.com/counsellingnews and click "Follow".
 
Featured Tweets
 
The Psychology of Nostalgia (in under 300 words): http://bit.ly/14M6nrC
 
Researchers Peer Inside Kids’ Brains to Better Understand Memory: http://bit.ly/17GfJYg
 
Taking the lock off the Spiritual Integration Toolbox: http://bit.ly/17S2IhR
 
The role of psychology in the prevention of youth violence: http://bit.ly/11eKLqD
 
Latest research: Physical and mental health is interconnected: http://bit.ly/1cOvDAh
 
Participatory action research in Aboriginal contexts: ‘Doing with’ to promote mental health (PDF): http://bit.ly/12FmnIH
 
The Stigma of Seeking Help: http://bit.ly/19V0KOf
 
Note that you need a Twitter profile to follow a list. If you do not have one yet, visit http://twitter.com to create a free profile today!
 
Tweet Count: 4,090
Follower Count: 5,907
 
Intoquotes
 
"Your daily life is your temple and your religion. When you enter into it take with you your all."
 
~ Khalil Gibran
 
Intoseminars
 
Many students of the Diploma of Counselling attend seminars to complete the practical requirements of their course. Seminars provide an ideal opportunity to network with other students and liaise with qualified counselling professionals in conjunction with completing compulsory coursework.
 
Not sure if you need to attend Seminars? Click here for information on Practical Assessments.
 
Below are upcoming seminars available during the remainder of 2013.
 
To register for a seminar, please contact your Student Support Centre.
 
BRISBANE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 10/08, 12/10, 07/12
Communication Skills II - 27/07, 28/09, 23/11
The Counselling Process - 31/08-01/09, 30/11-01/12
Counselling Therapies I - 21-22/09, 16-17/11
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/07, 19-20/10, 14-15/12
Case Management - 24-25/08, 02-03/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 06/10
Counselling Applications - 13/07, 09/11
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 31/08-01/09, 30/11-01/12
Communication Skills I - 10/08, 12/10, 07/12
Communication Skills II - 27/07, 28/09, 23/11
Counselling Therapies I - 21-22/09, 16-17/11
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/07, 19-20/10, 14-15/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 08/09, 24/11
Family Therapy - 29/09, 08/12
 
GOLD COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 17/08, 16/11
Communication Skills II - 21/09, 13/12
The Counselling Process - 19-20/07, 25-26/10, 07/12
Counselling Therapies I - 27-28/09
Counselling Therapies II - 22-23/11
Case Management - 18-19/10
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 02/08
Counselling Applications - 16/08
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 19-20/07, 25-26/10, 07/12
Communication Skills I - 17/08, 16/11
Communication Skills II - 21/09, 13/12
Counselling Therapies I - 27-28/09
Counselling Therapies II - 22-23/11
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 29/11
Family Therapy - 16/08
Case Management - 18-19/10
 
MELBOURNE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 27/07, 31/08, 28/09, 12/10, 23/11, 14/12
Communication Skills II - 28/07, 01/09, 13/10, 24/11, 15/12
The Counselling Process - 20-21/07 17-18/08, 13-14/09, 05-06/10, 16-17/11 06-07/12
Counselling Therapies I - 20-21/07, 03-04/08, 21-22/09, 19-20/10, 30/11-01/12
Counselling Therapies II - 06-07/07, 10-11/08, 07-08/09, 26-27/10, 07-08/12
Case Management - 10-11/08, 04-05/10, 14-15/12
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 25/08, 20/09, 09/11
Counselling Applications - 14/07, 29/09, 10/11
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 20-21/07 17-18/08, 13-14/09, 05-06/10, 16-17/11 06-07/12
Communication Skills I - 27/07, 31/08, 28/09, 12/10, 23/11, 14/12
Communication Skills II - 28/07, 01/09, 13/10, 24/11, 15/12
Counselling Therapies I - 20-21/07, 03-04/08, 21-22/09, 19-20/10, 30/11-01/12
Counselling Therapies II - 06-07/07, 10-11/08, 07-08/09, 26-27/10, 07-08/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 13/07, 15/09, 02/11
Family Therapy - 24/08, 08/11
Case Management - 10-11/08, 04-05/10, 14-15/12
 
NORTHERN TERRITORY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 10/08, 02/11
Communication Skills II - 07/11, 30/11
The Counselling Process - 28-29/09, 07-08/12
Counselling Therapies I - 20-21/07, 26-27/10
Counselling Therapies II - 24-25/08, 14-15/12
Case Management - 23-24/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 13/07, 12/10
Counselling Applications - 17/08, 09/11
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 28-29/09, 07-08/12
Communication Skills I - 10/08, 02/11
Communication Skills II - 07/11, 30/11
Counselling Therapies I - 20-21/07, 26-27/10
Counselling Therapies II - 24-25/08, 14-15/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 06/07, 19/10
Family Therapy - 27-28/07, 16/11
Counselling Applications - 17/08, 09/11
 
SOUTH AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 24/08, 26/10, 14/12
Communication Skills II - 25/08, 27/10, 15/12
The Counselling Process - 03-04/08, 19-20/10, 30/11-01/12
Counselling Therapies I - 21-22/09
Counselling Therapies II - 17-18/08, 23-24/11
Case Management - 31/08-01/09, 07-08/12
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 14/09
Counselling Applications - 27/07, 12/10
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 03-04/08, 19-20/10, 30/11-01/12
Communication Skills I - 24/08, 26/10, 14/12
Communication Skills II - 25/08, 27/10, 15/12
Counselling Therapies I - 21-22/09
Counselling Therapies II - 17-18/08, 23-24/11
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 28/07, 13/10
Family Therapy - 15/09
Case Management - 31/08-01/09, 07-08/12
 
SUNSHINE COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 10/08, 16/11
Communication Skills II - 11/08, 17/11
The Counselling Process - 21-22/09
Counselling Therapies I - 27-28/07
Counselling Therapies II - 19-20/10
Case Management - 28-29/09
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 12/10
Counselling Applications - 13/07, 02/11
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 21-22/09
Communication Skills I - 10/08, 16/11
Communication Skills II - 11/08, 17/11
Counselling Therapies I - 27-28/07
Counselling Therapies II - 19-20/10
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 24/08
Family Therapy - 07/09
Case Management - 28-29/09
 
SYDNEY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 29/07, 24/08, 16/09, 18/10, 09/11, 13/12
Communication Skills II - 30/07, 26/08, 17/09, 19/10, 18/11, 16/12
The Counselling Process - 01-02/08, 22-23/08, 13-14/09, 03-04/10, 14-15/11, 06-07/12
Counselling Therapies I - 19-20/07, 19-20/09, 22-23/11
Counselling Therapies II - 15-16/08, 08-09/10, 09-10/12
Case Management - 26-27/07, 14-15/10, 17-18/12
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 15/07, 05/09, 25/11
Counselling Applications - 16/07, 06/09, 26/11
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 01-02/08, 22-23/08, 13-14/09, 03-04/10, 14-15/11, 06-07/12
Communication Skills I - 29/07, 24/08, 16/09, 18/10, 09/11, 13/12
Communication Skills II - 30/07, 26/08, 17/09, 19/10, 18/11, 16/12
Counselling Therapies I - 19-20/07, 19-20/09, 22-23/11
Counselling Therapies II - 15-16/08, 08-09/10, 09-10/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 05/07, 27/09, 27/11
Family Therapy - 28/09, 12/12
Case Management - 26-27/07, 14-15/10, 17-18/12
 
TASMANIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 04/08, 03/11
Communication Skills II - 01/09, 01/12
The Counselling Process - 28-29/09, 07-08/12
Counselling Therapies I - 28-29/09, 07-08/12
Counselling Therapies II - 24-25/08, 14-15/12
Case Management - 23-24/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 14/07, 13/10
Counselling Applications - 18/08, 10/11
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 28-29/09, 07-08/12
Communication Skills I - 04/08, 03/11
Communication Skills II - 01/09, 01/12
Counselling Therapies I - 28-29/09, 07-08/12
Counselling Therapies II - 24-25/08, 14-15/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 21/07, 20/10
Family Therapy - 11/08, 17/11
Case Management - 23-24/11
 
WESTERN AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 06/07, 03/08, 14/09, 26/10, 07/12
Communication Skills II - 07/07, 04/08, 15/09, 27/10, 08/12
The Counselling Process - 13-14/07, 07-08/09, 05-06/10, 02-03/11
Counselling Therapies I - 28-29/09, 23-24/11
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/07, 21-22/09 14-15/12
Case Management - 24-25/08, 09-10/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 12/10
Counselling Applications - 11/08, 16/11
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 13-14/07, 07-08/09, 05-06/10, 02-03/11
Communication Skills I - 06/07, 03/08, 14/09, 26/10, 07/12
Communication Skills II - 07/07, 04/08, 15/09, 27/10, 08/12
Counselling Therapies I - 28-29/09, 23-24/11
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/07, 21-22/09 14-15/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 31/08, 13/10
Family Therapy - 10/08, 17/11
Case Management - 24-25/08, 09-10/11
 
Important Note: Advertising of the dates above does not guarantee availability of places in the seminar. Please check availability with the respective Student Support Centre.
 
 
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