In this Issue

Hello!
Intobachelor
Intothediploma
Intomhss
Intocounselling
Intoteam
Intobookstore
Intoarticles
Intodevelopment
Intoconnection
Intotwitter
Intoquotes
Intoseminars

Contact us

Publications

Editor: Sandra Poletto
Email: ezine@aipc.net.au
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Copyright: 2012 Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors

Hello!
 
Welcome to Edition 176 of Institute Inbrief. In this edition’s featured article we explore The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), a questionnaire based on Carl Jung's theory of Psychological Types and developed by Isabel Myers and Katherine Briggs during World War II.
 
Also in this edition:
  • Bachelor of Counselling and Psychological Science
  • MHSS Workshops – March & April
  • Articles and CPD updates
  • Blog and Twitter updates
  • Upcoming seminar dates
Enjoy your reading,
 
 
Editor.
 
 
Join our community:
 
 
Help those around you suffering mental illness in silence: www.mhss.net.au
 
Intobachelor
 
Become A Counsellor or Expand On Your Qualifications
With Australia’s Most Cost Effective & Flexible
 Bachelor of Counselling
 
AIPC is Australia’s largest and longest established educator of Counsellors. Over the past 22-years we’ve helped over 55,000 people from 27 countries pursue their dream of becoming a professional Counsellor.
 
The Bachelor of Counselling is a careful blend of theory and practical application. Theory is learnt through user-friendly learning materials that have been carefully designed to make your studies as accessible and conducive to learning as possible.
 
You can gain up to a full year’s academic credit (and save up to $8,700.00 with RPL) with a Diploma qualification. And with Fee-Help you don’t have to pay your subject fees upfront.
 
Here are some facts about the course:
  • Save up to $26,400.00 on your qualification.
  • Get started with NO MONEY DOWN using FEE-HELP.
  • Save up to $8,700.00 with RPL.
  • You will be supported by a large team of highly-qualified counselling professionals.
  • Study externally with individualised personal support.
  • Attend Residential Schools in Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane to hone your practical skills and network with other students.
You can learn more here: www.aipc.edu.au/degree
 
Watch our 2013 TV ad: www.aipc.net.au/tv2013
 
 
Become A Psychologist
 
Earn-While-You-Learn With Australia's
Best Value-for-Money & Flexible
Bachelor of Psychological Science
 
Psychology is one of the most versatile undergraduate courses, leading to many different career opportunities. And now there's a truly flexible way to get your qualification – with internal or external study options. It means working while you study is a realistic alternative.
 
Cost of living pressures and lifestyle choices are evolving the way we learn and Australian Institute of Psychology (AIP) is paving the way through flexible, innovative learning models:
  • Save up to $35,800 on your qualification.
  • Get started with NO MONEY DOWN with FEE-HELP.
  • Earn while you learn with flexible external learning options.
  • Be supported by a large team of highly-qualified Psychology professionals.
  • Study internally or externally with individualised personal support.
  • Enjoy a flexible and supportive learning experience.
  • Benefit from less onerous course entry requirements.
AIP is a registered Higher Education Provider with the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations, delivering a three-year Bachelor of Psychological Science. The Bachelor of Psychological Science is accredited by the Australian Psychology Accreditation Council (APAC), the body that sets the standards of training for Psychology education in Australasia.
 
APAC accreditation requirements are uniform across all universities and providers in the country, meaning that Australian Institute of Psychology, whilst a private Higher Education Provider, is required to meet exactly the same high quality standards of training, education and support as any university provider in the country.
 
You can learn more here: www.aip.edu.au/degree
 
Watch our 2013 TV ad: www.aip.edu.au/tv2013
 
Intothediploma
 
AIPC provides you with Flexible Course Delivery Modes
So YOU set the rules for how and when you learn...
 
AIPC’s accredited and nationally recognised Diploma of Counselling is designed so that you determine the manner and pace you study. You study entirely at your own pace (except of course if you’re receiving a government benefit such as Austudy) and you can start at any time, graduating in only 18-months.
 
Not only can you set the pace you study, you also determine the mode you want to study. You can study externally (at home with phone and email access to our counselling tutors); in-Class; online or any combination… all the time fully supported by our huge national team throughout our 8 Student Support Centres.
 
External learning means you can complete your entire course from the comfort of your home (or office, or overseas, or virtually anywhere). Your course comes complete with fully self-contained, referenced and professionally presented learning materials including 18 individual workbooks and readings. It really is as simple as working through the material and contacting us for support along the way. If you live locally to one of our support centres you can also attend tutorials to provide you with face to face contact if you wish (this option is ideal if you enjoy working more independently or have a busy schedule).
 
In-Class learning is a classroom forum where you learn with other students from a qualified lecturer. Classes are available in most main cities, at flexible times. In-Class is a great way for you to accelerate your learning, interact with other students and stay highly motivated. (This option is particularly suitable if you enjoy learning in the classroom environment with other students).
 
Online learning allows you to complete your learning entirely via your PC. You still receive all the high quality hardcopy resources (so you don’t miss out on anything!), but you’ll access all your learning materials and complete assessments online.
 
Any Combination. Of course you don’t have to stick with one learning method throughout your studies. You’re welcome to use whichever method suits your needs and desires at the time. You may choose to complete one workbook in-Class, another online, then externally. Whatever is most convenient!
 
Learn more - visit www.aipc.net.au/lz today!
 
Intomhss
 
Australia is suffering a Mental Health Crisis
 
Our suicide rate is now TWICE our road toll. Many suicides could possibly be averted, if only the people close to the victim were able to identify the early signs and appropriately intervene.
 
RIGHT NOW someone you care about – a family member, friend, or colleague – may be suffering in silence, and you don’t know.
 
With the right training, you can help that family member, friend or colleague.
 
Save $100 when you book your seat in an upcoming MHSS Workshop.
 
Upcoming workshops:
 
East Doncaster, VIC: 7 & 8 March
Lavington (Albury Wodonga), NSW: 18 & 19 March
Robina (Gold Coast), QLD: 23 & 24 March
Narre Warren, VIC: 4 & 5 April
Canning Vale, WA: 8 & 9 April
Fortitude Valley, QLD: 20 & 21 April
Glandore, SA: 20 & 21 April
 
Book your seat now: www.mhss.net.au/find-a-course
 
Your registration includes the 2-day facilitated workshop; a hardcopy of the MHSS Student Workbook; and access to an online dashboard where you can obtain your certificate, watch role-play videos, and much more.
 
MHSS Specialties
 
Once you complete the MHSS Core program you can undertake the MHSS Specialty Programs:
  1. Aiding Addicts;
  2. Supporting those with Depression or Anxiety;
  3. Supporting the Suicidal and Suicide Bereaved and;
  4. Supporting Challenged Families.
Book your seat at the next MHSS Workshop now and save $100.
 
If you have any queries, please contact Pedro Gondim on pedro@mhss.net.au.
 
PS Members of the ACA can accrue 28 OPD points by attending the MHSS Workshop.
 
Intocounselling
 
The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI)
 
During World War II, a mother-daughter team, Isabel Myers and Katherine Briggs, developed the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), a questionnaire based on Jung’s Psychological Types, which measures four dimensions of psychological preference related to how people perceive the world and make decisions (Wikipedia, 2012c; Geyer, 2011).
 
What it is
 
The MBTI is a forced-choice inventory based on Carl Jung's theory of Psychological Types. When people complete the instrument, they are given a four-letter code as their results which, when verified, indicates their personality preferences as one of 16 Types. The different type preferences describe different ways of working, taking in information, and making decisions. They distinguish different but equally effective learning styles and methods of managing, leading, coaching and teaching.
 
Comparison of different types yields wide disparities in general communication style and capacity for -- and ways of negotiating – teamwork, relationships, and counselling (Geyer, 2011). All of the results are stated in non-judgmental language, because the underlying assumption of the MBTI is that all preferences are useful in some contexts – and conversely, that all preferences will have contexts in which they are less effective.
 
Beginning in the early 1940's, Isabel Briggs Myers and her mother, Katherine Briggs, developed the MBTI by extending Jung's model and putting his concepts into language that could be understood and used by the average person. Isabel Myers worked on the MBTI for nearly 40 years, until her death in 1980. While the MBTI has been continually researched, its main revision came with the publication of Form M in 1998.
 
With a purpose of making a comprehensive theory of personality practical and useful in people's lives, the MBTI enables users to dynamically represent what people are, and what they may become. Inasmuch as the MBTI is not designed as a clinical inventory, all 16 types are considered valuable and normal; each has its own strengths and weaknesses and contributions to make to society and the workplace (Geyer, 2011).
 
What it measures
 
The MBTI contains items which attempt to establish a preference for one pole or the other in four dimensions of personality:
 
1. Extraversion (E) or introversion (I): the question of whether people gain their energy from the outer world of people, things, and action, or from the inner world of thoughts, ideas, and concepts. Extraverts (those closer to the Extraversion pole on the continuum) tend to prefer being in large groups of people and acting before reflecting. Introverts (those closer to the Introversion pole) prefer quieter activities and like to reflect before acting
 
2. Sensing (S) or Intuition (N): whether people mainly pick up information from their five senses and prefer dealing with facts and the world as it is, or they prefer to interpret and apply meaning to what they see in front of them. Those preferring Sensing are generally seen as grounded, down-to-earth types; they tend to solve problems using either past experience or present perception. Those using intuition, meanwhile – the visionaries and idealists of the world – tend to be future-oriented, working toward the fulfilment of transcendent principles.
 
3. Thinking (T) or Feeling (F): Whether a person prefers to make decisions based on objective, non-personal assessments, or on subjective, personal values. Either way of deciding can be rational (that is, an ordered process). It is important not to confuse a T preference with simply being intelligent or using the intellect. Nor is a preference for F indicative of emotion, or over-used emotionality. Some have observed that people preferring T orientation attend to “task first, relationships second”, whereas F people do the opposite: “relationships first, tasks second.” T preferences would tend to seek factual clarity in a dispute, looking to objective principles to help solve the problem; F people would attempt to look for common ground, commonly held values, and seek collaboration in order to help resolve the issue.
 
4. Judgment (J) or Perceiving (P): The question of how a person organises and runs his/her life. J preferences seek organisation, schedules, timeframes, and lists to guide them; they expect others to follow suit. P preferences tend to “go with the flow”, leaving decisions until the last possible moment and resisting closure before that. Their lives and work are spontaneous and less strictly ordered (Geyer, 2011). 
 
Here are the sixteen types and the typical strengths that result from the possible permutations of these four preference poles:
  1. ISTJ – Orderly, persevering, responsible, task-oriented, honest, fair-minded, loyal, business-oriented, interested in trends
  2. ISFJ – Serves & protects, helpful to others, sympathetic, team-oriented, loyal & dependable
  3. INFJ – understands others, harmonious, quietly determined, leads small groups, constructively confronts, comfortable with complexity
  4. INTJ – Original, has high standards, autonomous, practical, strategic, visionary, good decision quality
  5. ISTP – Independent, good troubleshooter, enjoys challenge, uses tools, solves concrete problems, action-oriented, knows how things work
  6. ISFP – quiet but warm, loyal & team oriented, builds relationships, values-driven, free spirit, artistic, lives in the action of the moment, likes to have an impact
  7. INFP – Peacekeeper, caring, idealistic, good at projects, participative, understands individual differences
  8. INTP – Has a world of ideas & strong willpower, writing skills, good conceptual and analytical capabilities, strategic, creates something from nothing, non-defensive
  9. ESTP – Fast-paced, good natured, fact-based, good at crisis management, decisive, has social presence, picks up on non-verbal cues, good negotiator, charismatic
  10. ESFP – Entertaining, team-oriented, accepting and compassionate, hands-on, action-oriented, warm, praising
  11. ENFP – Warm, enthusiastic, imaginative, future-oriented, relationship builder, develops others, appreciative, leads groups
  12. ENTP – Inventive, can argue both sides of an issue, stimulating, can multi-task, outspoken, confident and independent, quick, continuous improver
  13. ESTJ – Practical, likes to run things, results-driven, time-efficient, organised, decisive, planful & orderly, takes a team approach
  14. ESFJ – Warm-hearted, sociable, caring, strong values, involved, loyal, decisive, results-oriented
  15. ENFJ – Popular, responsible, charming, warm, good communicator, develops relationships, initiating, funny, good as coach & mentor
  16. ENTJ – Natural leader, confident, well-informed, future-oriented, logical & complex, commanding, independent, avid learner, questions a lot.
(Pearman, Lombardo, & Eichinger, 2005)
 
Preferences, not skills
 
It is important to note that the MBTI picks up a person’s preferences, not their skills. Thus a person acting from an N (intuitive) preference may have a vision for how he would like his life to be, but it may not be an appropriate vision: one which would tend to promote happiness or growth. An Extravert may desire to be with people, but not have the interpersonal skills to create interactions which genuinely recharge her “batteries”.
 
Similarly, people can develop their opposite pole by concerted will effort. Jung, in fact, believed that it was important for wholeness to understand and develop some skill in the opposite preferences. This tends to happen somewhat anyway, in middle age, as people see possibilities for personal expansion in “the unlived life” of the opposite preference. An Introvert, for example, can develop the ability to mix happily with people at parties, or approach people fairly comfortably in order to make a sale.
 
A Thinker can train herself to consider the effect on different groups before a decision is made, rather than just making the decision on the basis of objective facts. A person with an Intuitive preference can learn to look at the details and facts of a situation in addition to trying to “make meaning”. The Introvert, Thinker, and Intuitive preferences, however, will always be such individuals’ core preferences. When the opposite preference on a given dimension is developed, it supports the work of the core preference. If a person is forced to operate too long within an opposite preference, however, it can result in stress, eventual illness, or ineffectiveness at work and life (Geyer, 2011).
 
Applications
 
Because the MBTI is based on a comprehensive and coherent theory of personality, applications can be found in almost anything which involves people: that is, communication, strategic thinking, leadership, change management, performance appraisal, team building, planning, marketing, writing, counselling, personal development, career planning, teaching, and learning. The potential applications are limitless.
 
It would not be ethical or appropriate for recruiters to exclude a job candidate based on type, nor for a job seeker to exclude a whole occupation simply because most of those in it were a different type. It can be useful, however, to explore which personality types seem to be found in – and fit – which life endeavours. Thus, studies have shown that Extraverts tend to predominate in marketing and entrepreneurial endeavours, and Introverts are more common in professions such as medicine, law, and (surprisingly) politics. There seem to be slightly more Extraverts in Australian society than Introverts.
 
Intuitives (the “big picture” people) are far more readily found in academic institutions, particularly at the higher, post-graduate levels, and naturally are “at home” in the arts, counselling, and consulting. The feet-on-the-ground Sensing types find themselves in places where their keen ability to pick up details and facts is useful: sporting arenas, law enforcement, banking, small business, and teaching. Large organisations have many Sensing type preferences in them, although the upper echelons of management are normally more visionary N (Intuitive) types. There are about three times as many Sensers as Intuitive types in Australian society.
 
Thinker types will be overwhelmingly found in large corporate and government organisations, as well as in medicine, law, and management. In fact, in large organisations, it is often because the feelings and concerns of people are not factored in enough (mostly by Thinker types) that things go awry in decisions being made. Feelers are found in counselling and the helping professions, such as social work and caregiving. Not surprisingly, there is a gender divide among this preference, with more men being Thinkers and more women being Feelers. 
 
As regards the J-P preferences, Judgers are mostly chosen for management positions and law enforcement, banking, and teaching roles. Perceivers, conversely, are more commonly found in marketing, counselling, and entrepreneurial endeavours. There are estimated to be slightly more Judgers than Perceivers in contemporary Australian society (Geyer, 2011).
 
Sample items of the MBTI
 
While the actual Myers-Briggs Type Indicator can only be purchased online or from a distributor in-country, there are several sites online where individuals can take a test purporting to measure the same four dimensions of personality. Clicking on “Jung tests”, you can take one such test at: http://similarminds.com/personality_tests.html. Here are sample items from that instrument, where the respondent chooses (out of a scale of five) how “accurate” to “inaccurate” the statement is:
  • I prefer structured environments to unstructured ones.
  • I tend to trust the mind more than the heart.
  • I am far more casual than orderly.
  • I require lots of time alone to recharge.
  • I feel very comfortable around people.
  • I focus far more on possibilities than present reality.
  • An argument with feeling has far more effect on me than a cold rational one.
  • I tend to be more down-to-earth than head-in-the-clouds (Similarminds.com, n.d.)
This article is an extract of the Mental Health Academy course “Overview of the Principal Personality Tests”. More details: www.mentalhealthacademy.com.au.  
 
References:
 
Geyer, P. (2011).MBTI: An introduction to the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator ® & Personality Types. Personal Pathways: Exploring personality type and its applications. Reinhold Development. Retrieved on 18 December, 2012, from: hyperlink.
 
Geyer, P. (2011).Understanding the MBTI and Personality Type. Personal Pathways: Exploring personality type and its applications. Reinhold Development. Retrieved on 18 December, 2012, from: hyperlink.
 
Pearman, R.R., Lombardo, M.M., & Eichinger, R.W. (2005). You: Being more effective in your MBTI type. Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lominger, Ltd., Inc.
 
Similarminds.com (n.d.). Personality tests. Retrieved on 31 December, 2012, from: hyperlink.
 
Wikipedia (2012c). Personality test. Wikipedia: The free encyclopedia. Retrieved on 17 December, 2012, from hyperlink.
 
Join our community:
 
 
Intoteam
 
Navvii Lingam
 
Student Support Office
AIPC & AIP
 
Navvii Lingam joined AIPC in June 2011 in the role of Student Support Officer for AIPC’s Bachelor of Counselling. As a SSO, her tasks include processing enquiries, applications for enrolments, student support and coordination of administrative issues amongst Higher Education staff. Most often, her role involves connecting with students who experience difficulties in their studies from time to time and pointing them in the right direction.
 
Navvii holds a Bachelor of Arts (Psychology) from the University of Queensland. Whilst a student and after graduating, she worked as a telephone support volunteer with ARAFMI Queensland (a carer-based organisation providing support services for families and friends of people with mental health illness and/or psychiatric disability). In this role, Navvii was driven by her passion for mental health issues, interventions, aetiologies, and how every human being is able to lend a helping hand to these carers who have most often been neglected.
 
She also completed a stint as a Mentor in Mater Hospital’s pilot Volunteer program (Big Brother/Big Sister) with a family services organisation in Brisbane, QLD. In this role, Navvii mentored a 14 year old girl who had been removed from her home at a very young age due to her severely dysfunctional parents; and then continued to be abused by foster parents. This volunteer program was a true eye-opening experience for her; having to provide support and be a role model to a young person who had experienced immense trauma in her life.
 
On a personal note, Navvii is a Zumba/Latin Dance Instructor and Performer. In her own words, “music and dancing fuels my personal life at night and on the weekends apart from experimenting different cooking styles and cuisines”.
 
 
Intobookstore
 
The Institute has a list of recommended textbooks and DVDs that can add great value to your learning journey - and the good news is that you can purchase them very easily. The AIPC bookstore will give you discounted prices, an easy ordering method and quality guarantee!
 
This fortnight's feature is...
 
Name: Case Approach to Counseling and Psychotherapy, 8th Edition
Authors: Corey, Gerald
AIPC Code: COREY2
AIPC Price: $98.80 (RRP $117.95)
ISBN: 978-111-184-1768
 
Organised to allow different theories to be compared easily, this book illustrates the skilful application of theory and allows you to learn by seeing a therapeutic approach in action.
 
To order this book, contact your Student Support Centre or the AIPC Head Office (1800 657 667).
 
Intoarticles
 
Problem Gambling: Signs, Myths and Facts
 
Also called “ludomania” or “compulsive gambling”, problem gambling occurs when someone has an urge to continuously gamble despite harmful negative consequences or a desire to stop. It is not the gambler’s behaviour which defines whether problem gambling is occurring. Rather, it is whether the gambler or others experience harm from the gambling behaviour. At the severe end, it may be referred to as clinical “pathological gambling” if the gambler’s behaviour meets certain criteria (Wikipedia, 2012).
 
Click here to continue reading this article.
 
 
Counselling Strategies for Dealing with the Lonely Client
 
The level of loneliness a client experiences can be changed. It is important for the counsellor to recognise this. It is also important for the counsellor to be aware that loneliness is a common human experience. Loneliness does not have to be a negative or permanent state. Rather, it should be viewed as an indicator that important needs of the client are not being met (Peplau, 1998). A client will engage in counselling when they become overtly aware that their needs aren’t being met. The counsellor can help the client to identify which needs are not being met in the client’s situation.
 
Click here to continue reading this article.
 
Other articles: www.aipc.net.au/articles
 
Intodevelopment
 
Mental Health Academy – First to Knowledge in Mental Health
 
Get UNLIMITED access to over 50 Hours ($3,160.00 value) of personal & professional development video workshops, and over 80 specialist courses, for just $39/month or $349/year.
 
We want you to experience unlimited, unrestricted access to the largest repository of personal and professional development programs available anywhere in the country.
 
When you join our new Premium Level membership, you’ll get all-inclusive access to over 40 video workshops (presented by some of the world’s leading mental health experts) valued at $3,160.00.
 
You’ll also get access to over 80 professionally-developed courses exploring a huge range of topics, including counselling interventions, communications skills, conflict, child development, mental health disorders, stress and trauma, relationships, ethics, reflective practice, plus much more. 
 
All courses and videos have been specially developed by psychologist and counsellor educators and are conveniently accessible online, 24/7. They’re filled with content that’ll help you understand your own life, and how to improve on your current condition.
 
Benefits of becoming a premium member:
  • Unlimited access to over 80 specialist courses
  • Unlimited access to over 40 videos ($3,160.00 value)
  • Videos presented by international experts
  • New programs released every month
  • Extremely relevant topics
  • Online, 24/7 access
  • Counsellors: Over 150 hours of ACA-approved OPD
  • Psychologists: Over 150 'active' CPD Hours
Recently released and upcoming programs:
  • Narcissism: The Basics
  • Treating Narcissism In and Around Your Clients
  • Case Studies in Narcissism
  • Fostering Resilience in Clients
  • Principles of Psychosynthesis
  • Working with Subpersonalities
  • Understanding Will (developed and releasing soon)
  • Working with Will in the Therapy Room (developed and releasing soon)
  • Overview of Principal Personality Tests (developed and releasing soon)
  • Understanding the MBTI (Myers-Briggs Type Inventory) (developed and releasing soon)
  • The Chakra Model of Development (developed and releasing soon)
  • Keegan's Developmental Sequence (coming soon)
  • Understanding and Recognising Shadow in the Therapy Room (coming soon)
  • Decoding transference (coming soon)
  • Basic Stress Management (coming soon)
  • Brief Counselling: The Basic Skills (coming soon)
  • Coaching and Microcounselling (coming soon)
  • Counselling Children: Brief Strategies (coming soon)
  • Group Microskills: Encountering Diversity (coming soon)
  • Neuroscience: The Cutting Edge of Counselling's Future (coming soon)
  • Play Therapy: Basics for Beginning Students (coming soon)
 
 
Intoconnection
 
Have you visited the Counselling Connection Blog yet? There are over 600 interesting posts including case studies, profiles, success stories, videos and much more. Make sure you too get connected (and thank you for those who have already submitted comments and suggestions).
 
Social Support Development Skills
 
The saying that “no man is an island” seems not truer anywhere than in the realm of resilience. Happiness author and business coach Alvah Parker lists ten traits of resilient, happy people. In the very first one she notes that resilient people “are strong people who realize the importance of having a good social support system and are able to surround themselves with supportive friends and family” (Parker, 2012).
 
Similarly, organisational adviser/facilitator David Liddell, addressing managers, names six traits of resilience in organisational leaders, among which is: “Team Support: Although you are a strong individual, you know the value of social support and are able to surround yourself with supportive colleagues and strong leaders” (Liddell, 2012). So, we ask, what are the skills a person needs to develop good social support networks? We look at developing relational capacity and balancing dependence and independence.
 
Click here to read the full post.
 
Get new posts delivered by email! Visit our FeedBurner subscription page and click the link on the subscription box.
 
 
Intotwitter
 
Follow us on Twitter and get the latest and greatest in counselling news. To follow, visit http://twitter.com/counsellingnews and click "Follow".
 
Featured Tweets
 
 
 
 
 
 
Oscar-Winner Jennifer Lawrence Speaks Up for Mental Health http://psych.ly/XAHNbA
 
What constitutes the identity of a counselor? http://ct.counseling.org/2013/03/unmistaken-identity/
 
Note that you need a Twitter profile to follow a list. If you do not have one yet, visit http://twitter.com to create a free profile today!
 
Tweet Count: 3,900
Follower Count: 5,583
 
Intoquotes
 
"Watch your thoughts, for they become words. Watch your words, for they become actions. Watch your actions, for they become habits. Watch your habits, for they become character. Watch your character, for it becomes your destiny."
 
~ Tom Krause
 
Intoseminars
 
Many students of the Diploma of Counselling attend seminars to complete the practical requirements of their course. Seminars provide an ideal opportunity to network with other students and liaise with qualified counselling professionals in conjunction with completing compulsory coursework.
 
Not sure if you need to attend Seminars? Click here for information on Practical Assessments.
 
Below are upcoming seminars available during the first semester of 2013. For a full list of seminars, visit http://www.aipc.net.au/timetables.php.
 
To register for a seminar, please contact your Student Support Centre.
 
BRISBANE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 06/04, 15/06
Communication Skills II - 23/03, 18/05
The Counselling Process - 27-28/04, 29-30/06
Counselling Therapies I - 22-23/06
Counselling Therapies II - 13-14/04
Case Management - 25-26/05
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 16/06
Counselling Applications - 24/03
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 27-28/04, 29-30/06
Communication Skills I - 06/04, 15/06
Communication Skills II - 23/03, 18/05
Counselling Therapies I - 16-17/03, 22-23/06
Counselling Therapies II - 13-14/04
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 10/03, 02/06
Family Therapy - 07/04, 07/06
Case Management - 25-26/05
 
GOLD COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 25/05
Communication Skills II - 26/05
The Counselling Process - 16-17/03, 29-30/06
Counselling Therapies II - 18-19/05
Case Management - 15-16/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 20/04
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 16-17/03, 29-30/06
Communication Skills I - 25/05
Communication Skills II - 26/05
Counselling Therapies II - 18-19/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 06/04
Family Therapy - 08/06
Case Management - 15-16/06
 
MELBOURNE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 09/03, 27/04, 18/05, 29/06
Communication Skills II - 10/03, 28/04, 19/05, 30/06
The Counselling Process - 22-23/03, 20-21/04, 25-26/05, 21-22/06
Counselling Therapies I - 16-17/03, 13-14/04, 04-05/05, 22-23/06
Counselling Therapies II - 09-10/03, 06-07/04, 18-19/05, 08-09/06
Case Management - 13-14/04, 15-16/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 24/03, 02/06
Counselling Applications - 12/05
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 22-23/03, 20-21/04, 25-26/05, 21-22/06
Communication Skills I - 09/03, 27/04, 18/05, 29/06
Communication Skills II - 10/03, 28/04, 19/05, 30/06
Counselling Therapies I - 16-17/03, 13-14/04, 04-05/05, 22-23/06
Counselling Therapies II - 09-10/03, 06-07/04, 18-19/05, 08-09/06
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 11/05
Case Management - 13-14/04, 15-16/06
 
NORTHERN TERRITORY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 11/05
Communication Skills II - 01/06
The Counselling Process - 23-24/03, 29-30-06
Counselling Therapies I - 23-24/02
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/04
Case Management - 15-16/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 06/04
Counselling Applications - 20/05
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 23-24/03, 29-30-06
Communication Skills I - 11/05
Communication Skills II - 01/06
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/04
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 16/03
Family Therapy - 27/4
Counselling Applications - 20/05
 
SOUTH AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 13/04, 29/06
Communication Skills II - 14/04, 30/06
The Counselling Process - 06-07/04, 01-02/06
Counselling Therapies I - 15-16/06
Counselling Therapies II - 18-19/05
Case Management - 25-26/05
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 23/06
Counselling Applications - 16/03
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 06-07/04, 01-02/06
Communication Skills I - 13/04, 29/06
Communication Skills II - 14/04, 30/06
Counselling Therapies I - 15-16/06
Counselling Therapies II - 18-19/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 23/03
Family Therapy - 17/03, 22/06
Case Management - 25-26/05
 
SUNSHINE COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 18/05
Communication Skills II - 16/03, 22/06
The Counselling Process - 26-27/04
Counselling Therapies I - 22-23/03
Counselling Therapies II - 24-25/05
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 26-27/04
Communication Skills I - 18/05
Communication Skills II - 16/03, 22/06
Counselling Therapies I - 22-23/03
Counselling Therapies II - 24-25/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 14/06
Family Therapy - 21/06
 
SYDNEY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 22/03, 19/04, 20/05, 22/06
Communication Skills II - 23/03, 26/04, 21/05, 29/06
The Counselling Process - 15-16/03, 08-09/04, 29-30/04, 17-18/05, 20-21/06
Counselling Therapies I - 18-19/03, 10-11/05, 19-20/06
Counselling Therapies II - 11-12/04, 24-25/06
Case Management - 03-04/05
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 15-16/03, 08-09/04, 29-30/04, 17-18/05, 20-21/06
Communication Skills I - 22/03, 19/04, 20/05, 22/06
Communication Skills II - 23/03, 26/04, 21/05, 29/06
Counselling Therapies I - 18-19/03, 10-11/05, 19-20/06
Counselling Therapies II - 11-12/04, 24-25/06
Family Therapy - 07/05
Case Management - 03-04/05
 
TASMANIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 05/05
Communication Skills II - 02/06
The Counselling Process - 23-24/03, 29-30/06
Counselling Therapies I - 29-30/06
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/04
Case Management - 15-16/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 07/04
Counselling Applications - 19/05
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 23-24/03, 29-30/06
Communication Skills I - 05/05
Communication Skills II - 02/06
Counselling Therapies I - 29-30/06
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/04
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 17/03
Family Therapy - 28/04  
Case Management - 15-16/06
 
WESTERN AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 09/03, 25/05, 22/06
Communication Skills II - 10/03, 26/05, 23/06
The Counselling Process - 16-17/03, 13-14/04, 11-12/05, 15-16/06
Counselling Therapies I - 06-07/04, 08-09/06
Counselling Therapies II - 04-05/05
Case Management - 18-19/05
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 21/04
Counselling Applications - 23/03
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 16-17/03, 13-14/04, 11-12/05, 15-16/06
Communication Skills I - 09/03, 25/05, 22/06
Communication Skills II - 10/03, 26/05, 23/06
Counselling Therapies I - 06-07/04, 08-09/06
Counselling Therapies II - 04-05/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 01/06
Family Therapy - 20/04
Case Management - 18-19/05
 
Important Note: Advertising of the dates above does not guarantee availability of places in the seminar. Please check availability with the respective Student Support Centre.
 
 
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