In this Issue

Hello!
Intobachelor
Intothediploma
Intomhss
Intocounselling
Intoteam
Intobookstore
Intoarticles
Intodevelopment
Intoconnection
Intotwitter
Intoquotes
Intoseminars

Contact us

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Editor: Sandra Poletto
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Copyright: 2012 Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors

Hello!
 
Welcome to Edition 175 of Institute Inbrief. In this edition’s featured article you’ll learn the origins of Martin Seligman’s work in developing concepts of positive psychology, and how optimism skills can influence your (and your clients’) resilience.
 
Also in this edition:
  • Bachelor of Counselling and Psychological Science – Last Chance to Enrol
  • MHSS Workshops – February & March
  • Articles and CPD updates
  • Blog and Twitter updates
  • Upcoming seminar dates
Enjoy your reading,
 
 
Editor.
 
 
Join our community:
 
 
Help those around you suffering mental illness in silence: www.mhss.net.au
 
Intobachelor
 
Bachelor of Counselling and Bachelor of Psychological Science
Limited Places for the Semester 1, 2013 Intake – Last Chance to Enrol
 
Last month we opened up enrolments into the Bachelor of Counselling and Bachelor of Psychological Science, and already many of the available places have been filled.
 
But there are still places remaining.
 
Our unique learning model means you can earn-while-you-learn, so you don’t have to give up work to fit in your studies.
  • Get started with NO MONEY DOWN with government Fee-Help.
  • Study externally from anywhere in Australia, even overseas.
  • Residential Schools in Melbourne*, Sydney* and Brisbane.
  • [Psych] Save up to $40,000 on your qualification.
  • [Couns] Save up to $26,400 on your qualification.
  • Start with just 1 subject.
  • Online learning portal with access to all study materials, readings and video lectures.
  • [Psych] Accredited by the Australian Psychology Accreditation Council (APAC).
  • No minimum HSC or OP results required to gain entry.
  • Learn in a friendly, small group environment.
If you’re interested in pursuing a rewarding career in Counselling or Psychology, please submit your obligation free expression of interest.
 
Bachelor of Counselling: www.aipc.edu.au/degree 
 
Bachelor of Psychological Science here: www.aip.edu.au/degree
 
We expect to hit capacity enrolments for Semester 1 2013 very soon. So if you’re thinking about a career in psychology or counselling, please act now.
 
*Bachelor of Psychological Science - Residential Schools in Melbourne and Sydney are available for CORE subjects only.
 
Watch our 2013 TV ad – Bachelor of Counselling: www.aipc.net.au/tv2013
Watch our 2013 TV ad – Bachelor of Psychological Science: www.aip.edu.au/tv2013
 
Intothediploma
 
Imagine Being Passionate About Your Work
And Assisting People Every Day Lead Better Lives
 
 
It’s rare these days to hear people talk about their work with true passion. You hear so many stories of people working to pay the bills; putting up with imperfect situations; and compromising on their true desires.
 
That’s why it’s always so refreshing to hear regular stories from graduates living their dream to be a Counsellor. They’re always so full of energy, enthusiasm and passion. There’s no doubt that counselling is one of the most personally rewarding and enriching professions.
 
Just imagine someone comes to you for assistance. They’re emotionally paralysed by events in their life. They can’t even see a future for themselves. They can only focus on their pain and grief. The despair is so acute it pervades their entire life. Their relationship is breaking down and heading towards a divorce. They can’t focus on work and are getting in trouble with their boss. They feel they should be able to handle their problems alone, but know they can’t. It makes them feel helpless, worthless. Their self-esteem has never been lower. They’re caught in a cycle of destruction and pain.
 
Now imagine you have the knowledge and skills to help this person overcome their challenges. You assist to relieve their intense emotional pain. You give them hope for the future. You assist to rebuild their self-esteem and lead a satisfying, empowered life.
 
As a Counsellor you can experience these personal victories every day. And it’s truly enriching. There is nothing more fulfilling than helping another person overcome seemingly impossible obstacles.
 
Learn more here: www.aipc.net.au/lz
 
Intomhss
 
Australia is suffering a Mental Health Crisis
 
Our suicide rate is now TWICE our road toll. Many suicides could possibly be averted, if only the people close to the victim were able to identify the early signs and appropriately intervene.
 
RIGHT NOW someone you care about – a family member, friend, or colleague – may be suffering in silence, and you don’t know.
 
With the right training, you can help that family member, friend or colleague.
 
Save $100 when you book your seat in an upcoming MHSS Workshop.
 
Upcoming workshops (February/March):
 
Robina (Gold Coast), QLD: 23 & 24 February
Canning Vale, WA: 28 February & 1 March
East Doncaster, VIC: 7 & 8 March
Lavington (Albury Wodonga), NSW: 18 & 19 March
Robina (Gold Coast), QLD: 23 & 24 March
 
Book your seat now: www.mhss.net.au/find-a-course
 
Your registration includes the 2-day facilitated workshop; a hardcopy of the MHSS Student Workbook; and access to an online dashboard where you can obtain your certificate, watch role-play videos, and much more.
 
MHSS Specialties
 
Once you complete the MHSS Core program you can undertake the MHSS Specialty Programs:
  1. Aiding Addicts;
  2. Supporting those with Depression or Anxiety;
  3. Supporting the Suicidal and Suicide Bereaved and;
  4. Supporting Challenged Families.
Book your seat at the next MHSS Workshop now and save $100.
 
If you have any queries, please contact Pedro Gondim on pedro@mhss.net.au.
 
PS Members of the ACA can accrue 28 OPD points by attending the MHSS Workshop.
 
Intocounselling
 
Optimism Skills and Resilience
 
Do you tend to look on the bright side of things? More importantly for your clinical work (if you are a counsellor, psychologist or social worker): do your clients? It used to be deemed generally irrelevant whether someone tended to see the glass “half-full” or “half-empty”, but the work of Martin Seligman in recent decades has shown that optimists have an advantage in the game of surviving and thriving.
 
Learned helplessness and optimistic explanatory style
 
Acknowledging that he is now called the “father of positive psychology”, Martin Seligman nevertheless claims that he came to an understanding about how vital optimism is for resilience as a result of long years of research into failure. His experiments, now part of the phenomenon known as learned helplessness, are classic and have been replicated many times. Basically, they involved (at different times) three groups of beings: dogs, rats, and later human beings, being subjected to either shocks (for the animals) or unpleasant experiences, such as noise, for the human subjects. In each case, the experiments would consist in three groups of subjects. 
 
Group One, the first experimental group, would be subjected to the shock or noise. This first group would have a way of turning off the shock or noise, which all the subjects successfully learned to do. The second experimental group was called the “yoked” group, because their outcomes were “yoked” to those of the first experimental group. That is, the second group experienced shock/noise when the first group did, but, at Phase One of the studies, did not have a way to turn it off. The third group was the “control group”, which experienced no shock or noise. 
 
The second phase of experimentation involved administering shock or noise once again to the two experimental groups. As in the first phase, the Group One subjects learned to turn it off. The third group was never exposed to shock or noise, so did not change at all. But the second, “yoked” group underwent an interesting phenomenon. In all types of subjects – dogs, rats, and human beings – most of the second group, when given the (easy) possibility of turning off the unpleasant experience (noise or shock), failed to learn to do so, often just cowering in the corner of the pen (say, for dogs), even though they could easily learn to avert the experience. The second group experienced what came to be called learned helplessness. That is, in the first phase, they had learned that they had no control and could not achieve any effect no matter what they did, and so in the second phase – when they could get out of the shock/noise -- they made no attempt to do so.
 
Results from similar studies over the years always showed these patterns, but there was one variation Seligman and others observed which ultimately gave them the key to so-called “positive psychology”. That is that, no matter what was done to them, about one-third of the second, “yoked” group, refused to learn to become helpless. No matter what they were exposed to, they continued to believe that they had some control, that they could achieve some effect, or that there was a way out of the aversive experience (Seligman, 2011; Carbonatto, 2009). 
 
Over the years, Seligman and colleagues began to look more deeply into how this one-third of “yoked” subjects was thinking in relation to both the experimental circumstances and life in general. In one set of experiments, the yoked group was given a task which, no matter how it was approached, could not be solved. After the period of attempting the task, the group were interviewed about their effort and their “failure”.
 
Most of the subjects were in a slightly depressed mood. The subjects who were not – those who refused to learn helplessness – were consistent in their explanations, offering a number of attributions for the “failure”, such as “It must have been a temporary glitch”, “It didn’t work today, but I could probably do it tomorrow,” “Other parts of my life are going ok” and so on. None of them attributed their inability to solve the task to their own incompetence or dumbness (Seligman, 1992, pp 19-28).
 
After analysing many hours of their taped responses, Seligman concluded that the way to “immunise” people against learned helplessness, against depression and anxiety, and against giving up after failure was by teaching them to think like these optimists. What has come to be called “optimistic explanatory style” (Seligman, 1992; 2011) comes down to three crucial dimensions:
 
Permanence: Whether we believe that a given event will go on for a long time or not. Pessimists believe that “bad” events will go on for a long time, whereas optimists believe just the opposite, that the tough stuff is about to end. For example, an optimist who lost her job would tend to believe that she could replace it fairly readily.
 
Pervasive: How specific or universal the event is: in other words, how much of our lives it pervades. Pessimists believe that the difficult happening will spread from one area of life to others, whereas optimists are quick to point out that a given difficult circumstance is limited in scope. The optimist, for example, may have lost her job, but she will observe that she still has excellent health and supportive relationships; in other words, she will say, the “bad news” is confined to the work arena, and does not affect other aspects of life.
 
Personalised: Whether it is we or others who get the blame (for the “bad” stuff that happens), or the credit (for the achievements). Optimists consistently attribute failures to causes outside themselves (like Seligman’s subjects, who said that the task could not be completed because of a “glitch” or something else, but not because they were incompetent to do it). Pessimists, conversely, blame themselves, even when they should not. The job-losing optimist might, for instance, claim that she had performed well in her role, but that she was let go because the organisation was going through a downturn (Seligman, 1992).
 
How optimistic do you perceive your clients to be? The good news is that, even if they are not natural optimists, they can come to embrace learned optimism. You can help them, by challenging places in their thinking where they succumb to negative thinking (such as any time they “awfulise” about something being permanent, ruining their “whole life”, or being “my entire fault”). There are some other optimism skills to employ as well.
 
Social comparison thinking
 
In addition to helping your clients re-frame their thoughts to see “bad” events as temporary, limited, and not their fault (when events are out of their control), you can encourage them to engage in social comparison thinking. As an optimism skill, this is the habit of making positive comparisons with similar others. Let us explain that a bit.
 
Social comparison thinking can enhance or diminish resilience according to how it is used. If your client, say, engages in comparing herself with others, but those others constitute an unfair reference group, then she may be causing herself to feel less satisfied with her own life, and thus be less resilient. An example would be the person who wants to learn French and enrols in French language class, but is hard of hearing. It would be unfair to compare her performance in conversational skills at the end of the class with those students who had normal hearing, some of whom may have even had the advantage of living or travelling in France!
 
Conversely, work by Cash (1983) has shown that social comparison thinking, applied as an optimism skill, involves finding a favourable reference group and comparing oneself with that. For instance, a new real estate sales person, who may be working part time at a paid job while he builds up his real estate contacts, would not be engaging optimist skills, nor thinking resiliently, if he insisted on comparing his sales record for the year with those of more seasoned real estate agents, who work full time and may have been doing the job for many years. He would be much more valid to compare himself to other new agents, especially those working part-time.
 
Silver-lining thinking: Avoid “focusing illusions”
 
The optimism skill of silver-lining thinking goes hand in hand with avoiding what researchers have called “focusing illusions” (Schkade and Kahneman, 1987). It is about acknowledging the dark clouds (say, impending divorce or diagnosis of an incurable condition), but refusing to give an inappropriate amount of attention (focus) to certain feared aspects of the “cloud”, concentrating instead on the silver lining in the clouds: some aspects of the situation that may be positive, despite the overall tough circumstance. An example of this occurred in the late 1980s, when getting AIDS was pretty much a death sentence. On an “AIDS Road Show” set up to promote safe sex, one of the AIDS patients participating was asked how he was managing to live so cheerfully and with such obvious happiness, given his condition. “Oh,” he said, “that’s easy. I – and many others with AIDS – know that our time may be limited, so we just let the rubbish go by.”
 
That is, he saw the dark cloud – the spectre of death hanging over him – and decided not to focus on his probable shortened lifespan, looking instead to the quality of his relationships and the enjoyable and meaningful things he could do with his time. He resiliently re-framed, “I’m probably going to die before too long” to “I have a wonderful quality of life now”, thus avoiding the focusing illusion that all of life now must be held ransom to (focused on) early death.
 
Take advantage of opportunities
 
The skill of seeing, and then taking up, opportunities, is a response which, to be fair, crosses over into resilience skills other than strictly optimism ones. Wherever in a schema it occurs, the act of attempting to better one’s position is an expression of trust that a better future exists, and that it can be attained: in other words, an optimistic response. History is rife with people who, in the face of some unfortunate experience, nevertheless maximised it by a “sideways” response which utilised what resources were available in the moment.
 
Julio Iglesias once told an interviewer making a documentary film about him that his singing career may not even have gotten off the ground were it not for having broken his leg as a teenager. Lying there in traction in hospital, Julio could not move much, let alone get back on the playing field to do the football he was so keen to play. Someone brought him a guitar to fool around with and, as they say, the rest is history; Julio took full advantage of the months on his back to begin an endeavour that would define his life. 
 
The power of optimism
 
Why should we strive – or encourage our clients to strive – for optimism? Seligman has noted that there are “literally hundreds of studies” which show that pessimists get discouraged and give up more easily, while optimists’ performance at work and in academic and sporting arenas tends to exceed predictions made for them. They generally enjoy excellent health, the capacity to age well and even increased longevity (Seligman, 1992, p 5).
 
Attributional Style Questionnaire: An exercise
 
Many of the questionnaires and survey instruments designed to work out whether someone is an optimist or not are statistically complex and difficult to use. Dykema et al (1996) offer a simplified questionnaire for general use to assess the attributional style of your clients. For each of twelve situations, you ask your client to vividly imagine being in the situation, and then state what would have caused the situation to happen to them. For each item, the client rates his/her sense of permanence (on a 7-point scale from -3 to +3) with “How likely is it that this will continue to affect you?” The client’s sense of globality-specificity (pervasiveness) is also rated by answering “How much is the cause you gave likely to affect other areas of life?”
 
While you probably do not have access to formal statistical analysis of your client’s responses, you will be able to see the general trend. The more clients give attribution to factors outside themselves for negative events, the more they see events/setbacks as temporary, and the more they see them as specific, affecting just one area of life (as opposed to being global or pervasive), the more optimistic they are.
 
On this instrument, the highest possible score is 72: six points possible for each of 12 situations. The lowest possible score is -72. The lower the scores (especially including total scores that are below zero and thus in negative territory), the more optimistic the person’s explanatory (attributional) style. The higher the total score, the more the person is engaging in pessimistic thought and is thus low on optimism. Those who score low on optimism can be trained to boost their optimistic outlook.
 
This article is an extract of the Mental Health Academy course “Fostering Resilience in Clients”. For more information, visit www.mentalhealthacademy.com.au.  
 
References:
 
Carbonatto, M. (2009). Back from the edge. Auckland, New Zealand: Cape Catley, Ltd.
 
Cash, T. F. C., Walker, D., and Butters, J.W. Mirror, mirror on the wall...? Contrast effects and self-evaluations of physical attractiveness. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin 9 (3), pp 351 – 358.
 
Dykema, J., Bergbower, K., Doctora, J., and Peterson, C. (1996). An Attributional style questionnaire for general use. Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, 14, pp 100 – 108. Retrieved on 10 December, 2012, from: hyperlink          
 
Schkade, D.A. and Kahneman, D. (1987). Does living in California make people happy? A focusing illusion in judgments of life satisfaction. Psychological Science, Vol 9 (5), pp 340 – 346.
 
Seligman, M. (1992). Learned optimism. Australia: Random House.
 
Seligman, M. (2011). Building resilience. Harvard Business Review. Harvard Business School Publishing. Retrieved on 3 December, 2012, from: hyperlink
 
Join our community:
 
 
Intoteam
 
Stephanie Malone
 
Australian Institute of Psychology
 
Stephanie obtained her BSc (hons) Psychology from Lancaster University in 2006 where her research focused on the ability of children with autism to learn words. Many questions relating to the language skills of children with autism were raised by this research project which led Stephanie to continue this research during her Masters in Psychological Research Methods at Lancaster. This experience consolidated her love of working with people with learning disabilities and developmental disorders and applying knowledge of Psychology to offer support. Upon completing the Master course, Stephanie took a year out from academia and undertook the role of Assistant Clinical Psychologist at a further education residential college for 18-25 year olds with cerebral palsy and additional needs in the UK.
 
In 2008, Stephanie was awarded a Teaching Studentship at Lancaster University to conduct her doctoral research into the word learning of children with autism within non-ostensive contexts. Over the course of the next three years, Stephanie examined word learning within a variety of non-ostensive contexts demonstrating that children with autism have an unexpected degree of word learning ability in these contexts. Her doctoral research teased apart the mechanisms that these children may be using to learn words rather than drawing upon social pragmatic skills (including gaze following and understanding others’ intentions) alone.
 
During the final year of her PhD, Stephanie was offered a permanent lectureship at Edge Hill University, England. Here she specialized in teaching Educational Psychology and Research Methods and Statistics. In 2012, she moved to Brisbane where she started working with the Australian Institute of Psychology.
 
Stephanie’s research explores the impact of social pragmatic skills on word learning in typically developing children and children with autism. Additionally, her research has explored the mechanisms which underlie the word learning constraint of mutual exclusivity.
 
 
Intobookstore
 
The Institute has a list of recommended textbooks and DVDs that can add great value to your learning journey - and the good news is that you can purchase them very easily. The AIPC bookstore will give you discounted prices, an easy ordering method and quality guarantee!
 
This fortnight's feature is...
 
Name: Basic Personal Counselling, 7th edition
Authors: Geldard D. & Geldard K.
AIPC Code: GELDARD
AIPC Price: $50.20 (RRP $59.95)
ISBN: 978-144-254-5953
 
A training manual for counsellors which is a comprehensive, easy-to-read introduction to personal counselling, written for professional and volunteer counsellors and those who train them.
 
To order this book, contact your Student Support Centreor the AIPC Head Office (1800 657 667).
 
Intoarticles
 
Groups and Group Therapy
 
Group therapy is a popular mode of therapy for both therapists and clients. Group therapy is a highly effective form of psychotherapy that is based on interdependence and interaction among the group members who mutually disclose personal material (Lasky & Riva, 2006). Group psychotherapy began in the late 1800′s/early 1900′s when Joseph Pratt, a Boston physician, recognised the positive effects on tuberculosis patients who did not have access to sanatoria (Laski & Riva, 2006). Because their recovery required strict hygienic regimens in their impoverished homes, he used regular group meetings to educate his patients on how to combat the diseases.
 
Other psychiatrists were influenced by this method. For example one psychotherapist, Cody Marsh, even included dance classes in his hospital (Brabender, Fallon & Smolar, 2004; Laski & Riva, 2006). The role of the charismatic leader and the dynamics of group relationships were recognised by Freud later.
 
Click here to continue reading this article.
 
 
Understanding Self Harming
 
Self harming is a dangerous and pervasive problem especially common among adolescents and young adults (Craigen & Foster, 2009; Craigan & Foster, 2009). Self harming is considered to be a common reason for emergency admission to hospital and also a common reason for suicide (Low, Jones, Duggan, Power & Mac Leod, 2001).
 
However, research suggests that self harm and suicide are different whereby self harming does not occur as an attempt to end life (Gollust, Eisenberg & Golberstein, 2008). Self harming, or self injury as it is often referred to, is defined as a deliberate destruction of one’s own body tissue without the aid of another person and without a conscious decision to suicide. Suicide refers to a self inflicted injury with an intent to end one’s own life (Knock, 2007).
 
Click here to continue reading this article.
 
Other articles: www.aipc.net.au/articles
 
Intodevelopment
 
Mental Health Academy – First to Knowledge in Mental Health
 
Get UNLIMITED access to over 50 Hours ($3,160.00 value) of personal & professional development video workshops, and over 80 specialist courses, for just $39/month or $349/year.
 
We want you to experience unlimited, unrestricted access to the largest repository of personal and professional development programs available anywhere in the country.
 
When you join our new Premium Level membership, you’ll get all-inclusive access to over 40 video workshops (presented by some of the world’s leading mental health experts) valued at $3,160.00.
 
You’ll also get access to over 80 professionally-developed courses exploring a huge range of topics, including counselling interventions, communications skills, conflict, child development, mental health disorders, stress and trauma, relationships, ethics, reflective practice, plus much more. 
 
All courses and videos have been specially developed by psychologist and counsellor educators and are conveniently accessible online, 24/7. They’re filled with content that’ll help you understand your own life, and how to improve on your current condition.
 
Benefits of becoming a premium member:
  • Unlimited access to over 80 specialist courses
  • Unlimited access to over 40 videos ($3,160.00 value)
  • Videos presented by international experts
  • New programs released every month
  • Extremely relevant topics
  • Online, 24/7 access
  • Counsellors: Over 150 hours of ACA-approved OPD
  • Psychologists: Over 150 'active' CPD Hours
Recently released and upcoming programs:
  • Narcissism: The Basics
  • Treating Narcissism In and Around Your Clients
  • Case Studies in Narcissism
  • Fostering Resilience in Clients (developed and releasing soon)
  • Principles of Psychosynthesis (developed and releasing soon)
  • Helping Clients to Integrate Subpersonalities (developed and releasing soon)
  • Understanding Will (developed and releasing soon)
  • Working with Will in the Therapy Room (developed and releasing soon)
  • Overview of Principal Personality Tests (developed and releasing soon)
  • Understanding the MBTI (Myers-Briggs Type Inventory) (coming soon)
  • The Chakra Model of Development (developed and releasing soon)
  • Keegan's Developmental Sequence (coming soon)
  • Understanding and Recognising Shadow in the Therapy Room (coming soon)
  • Decoding transference (coming soon)
  • Basic Stress Management (coming soon)
  • Brief Counselling: The Basic Skills (coming soon)
  • Coaching and Microcounselling (coming soon)
  • Counselling Children: Brief Strategies (coming soon)
  • Group Microskills: Encountering Diversity (coming soon)
  • Neuroscience: The Cutting Edge of Counselling's Future (coming soon)
  • Play Therapy: Basics for Beginning Students (coming soon)
 
 
Intoconnection
 
Have you visited theCounselling Connection Blog yet? There are over 600 interesting posts including case studies, profiles, success stories, videos and much more. Make sure you too get connected (and thank you for those who have already submitted comments and suggestions).
 
Helping a client become more effective in the workplace
 
(Part of our new “Coaching Scenarios” Blog category)
 
Michael comes to you to assist him in being more effective in the workplace. He has recently started in a new position and finds it difficult to communicate with his manager who does not seem to have time for him.
 
As the coach, how would you help this client?
 
There are a couple of issues that need to be looked at in the coaching conversations. Is Michael’s desire to be more effective based on an invalid / incorrect belief that he is not meeting the expectations of his manager? In what way has Michael contributed to the current situation? How can Michael improve his communication with his manager?
 
Click here to read the full post.
 
Get new posts delivered by email! Visit our FeedBurner subscription page and click the link on the subscription box.
 
 
Intotwitter
 
Follow us on Twitter and get the latest and greatest in counselling news. To follow, visit http://twitter.com/counsellingnews and click "Follow".
 
Featured Tweets
 
 
 
 
Attachment: The Importance of First Relationships: http://dlvr.it/2ycbfR
 
 
Bilingual Babies Know Their Grammar by 7 Months: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130214111606.htm
 
 
Note that you need a Twitter profile to follow a list. If you do not have one yet, visit http://twitter.com to create a free profile today!
 
Tweet Count: 3,881
Follower Count: 5,523
 
Intoquotes
 
"Some of the world’s greatest feats were accomplished by people not smart enough to know they were impossible."
 
~ Doug Larson
 
Intoseminars
 
Many students of the Diploma of Counselling attend seminars to complete the practical requirements of their course. Seminars provide an ideal opportunity to network with other students and liaise with qualified counselling professionals in conjunction with completing compulsory coursework.
 
Not sure if you need to attend Seminars? Click here for information on Practical Assessments.
 
Below are upcoming seminars available during the first semester of 2013. For a full list of seminars, visit http://www.aipc.net.au/timetables.php.
 
To register for a seminar, please contact your Student Support Centre.
 
BRISBANE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 06/04, 15/06
Communication Skills II - 23/03, 18/05
The Counselling Process - 23-24/02, 27-28/04, 29-30/06
Counselling Therapies I - 22-23/06
Counselling Therapies II - 13-14/04
Case Management - 2-3/03, 25-26/05
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 16/06
Counselling Applications - 24/03
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 23-24/02, 27-28/04, 29-30/06
Communication Skills I - 06/04, 15/06
Communication Skills II - 23/03, 18/05
Counselling Therapies I - 16-17/03, 22-23/06
Counselling Therapies II - 13-14/04
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 10/03, 02/06
Family Therapy - 07/04, 07/06
Case Management - 2-3/03, 25-26/05
 
GOLD COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 25/05
Communication Skills II - 26/05
The Counselling Process - 16-17/03, 29-30/06
Counselling Therapies I - 02-03/03
Counselling Therapies II - 18-19/05
Case Management - 15-16/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 20/04
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 16-17/03, 29-30/06
Communication Skills I - 25/05
Communication Skills II - 26/05
Counselling Therapies I - 02-03/03
Counselling Therapies II - 18-19/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 06/04
Family Therapy - 08/06
Case Management - 15-16/06
 
MELBOURNE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 09/03, 27/04, 18/05, 29/06
Communication Skills II - 10/03, 28/04, 19/05, 30/06
The Counselling Process - 22-23/03, 20-21/04, 25-26/05, 21-22/06
Counselling Therapies I - 16-17/03, 13-14/04, 04-05/05, 22-23/06
Counselling Therapies II - 09-10/03, 06-07/04, 18-19/05, 08-09/06
Case Management - 23-24/02, 13-14/04, 15-16/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 24/03, 02/06
Counselling Applications - 03/03, 12/05
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 22-23/03, 20-21/04, 25-26/05, 21-22/06
Communication Skills I - 09/03, 27/04, 18/05, 29/06
Communication Skills II - 10/03, 28/04, 19/05, 30/06
Counselling Therapies I - 16-17/03, 13-14/04, 04-05/05, 22-23/06
Counselling Therapies II - 09-10/03, 06-07/04, 18-19/05, 08-09/06
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 11/05
Case Management - 23-24/02, 13-14/04, 15-16/06
 
NORTHERN TERRITORY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 11/05
Communication Skills II - 02/03, 01/06
The Counselling Process - 23-24/03, 29-30-06
Counselling Therapies I - 23-24/02
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/04
Case Management - 15-16/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 06/04
Counselling Applications - 20/05
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 23-24/03, 29-30-06
Communication Skills I - 11/05
Communication Skills II - 02/03, 01/06
Counselling Therapies I - 23-24/02
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/04
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 16/03
Family Therapy - 27/4
Counselling Applications - 20/05
 
SOUTH AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 23/02, 13/04, 29/06
Communication Skills II - 24/02, 14/04, 30/06
The Counselling Process - 06-07/04, 01-02/06
Counselling Therapies I - 02-03/03, 15-16/06
Counselling Therapies II - 18-19/05
Case Management - 25-26/05
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 23/06
Counselling Applications - 16/03
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 06-07/04, 01-02/06
Communication Skills I - 23/02, 13/04, 29/06
Communication Skills II - 24/02, 14/04, 30/06
Counselling Therapies I - 02-03/03, 15-16/06
Counselling Therapies II - 18-19/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 23/03
Family Therapy - 17/03, 22/06
Case Management - 25-26/05
 
SUNSHINE COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 18/05
Communication Skills II - 16/03, 22/06
The Counselling Process - 26-27/04
Counselling Therapies I - 22-23/03
Counselling Therapies II - 24-25/05
Case Management - 01-02/03
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 26-27/04
Communication Skills I - 18/05
Communication Skills II - 16/03, 22/06
Counselling Therapies I - 22-23/03
Counselling Therapies II - 24-25/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 14/06
Family Therapy - 21/06
Case Management - 01-02/03
 
SYDNEY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 22/03, 19/04, 20/05, 22/06
Communication Skills II - 23/03, 26/04, 21/05, 29/06
The Counselling Process - 22-23/02, 15-16/03, 08-09/04, 29-30/04, 17-18/05, 20-21/06
Counselling Therapies I - 18-19/03, 10-11/05, 19-20/06
Counselling Therapies II - 11-12/04, 24-25/06
Case Management - 20-21/02, 03-04/05
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 01/03
Counselling Applications - 02/03
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 22-23/02, 15-16/03, 08-09/04, 29-30/04, 17-18/05, 20-21/06
Communication Skills I - 22/03, 19/04, 20/05, 22/06
Communication Skills II - 23/03, 26/04, 21/05, 29/06
Counselling Therapies I - 18-19/03, 10-11/05, 19-20/06
Counselling Therapies II - 11-12/04, 24-25/06
Family Therapy - 07/05
Case Management - 20-21/02, 03-04/05
 
TASMANIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 05/05
Communication Skills II - 03/03, 02/06
The Counselling Process - 23-24/03, 29-30/06
Counselling Therapies I - 23-24/02, 29-30/06
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/04
Case Management - 15-16/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 07/04
Counselling Applications - 19/05
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 23-24/03, 29-30/06
Communication Skills I - 05/05
Communication Skills II - 03/03, 02/06
Counselling Therapies I - 23-24/02, 29-30/06
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/04
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 17/03
Family Therapy - 28/04  
Case Management - 15-16/06
 
WESTERN AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 09/03, 25/05, 22/06
Communication Skills II - 10/03, 26/05, 23/06
The Counselling Process - 16-17/03, 13-14/04, 11-12/05, 15-16/06
Counselling Therapies I - 06-07/04, 08-09/06
Counselling Therapies II - 23-24/02, 04-05/05
Case Management - 18-19/05
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 21/04
Counselling Applications - 23/03
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 16-17/03, 13-14/04, 11-12/05, 15-16/06
Communication Skills I - 09/03, 25/05, 22/06
Communication Skills II - 10/03, 26/05, 23/06
Counselling Therapies I - 06-07/04, 08-09/06
Counselling Therapies II - 23-24/02, 04-05/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 01/06
Family Therapy - 20/04
Case Management - 18-19/05
 
Important Note: Advertising of the dates above does not guarantee availability of places in the seminar. Please check availability with the respective Student Support Centre.
 
 
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