In this Issue

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Intobachelor
Intothediploma
Intomhss
Intocounselling
Intostories
Intobookstore
Intoarticles
Intodevelopment
Intoconnection
Intotwitter
Intoquotes
Intoseminars

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Copyright: 2012 Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors

Hello!
Welcome to Edition 174 of Institute Inbrief. In this edition’s featured article we talk about the problem spending, also referred to as “shopping addiction”. You’ll learn its definitions, signs and symptoms, and review the cycle of (spending) compulsivity.
 
Also in this edition:
  • Bachelor of Counselling and Psychological Science – Closing Soon
  • MHSS Workshops
  • Graduate story
  • Blog and Twitter updates
  • Upcoming seminar dates
Enjoy your reading,
 
 
Editor.
 
 
Join our community:
 
 
Help those around you suffering mental illness in silence: www.mhss.net.au
 
Intobachelor
 
Bachelor of Counselling and Bachelor of Psychological Science
Limited Places for the Semester 1, 2013 Intake – Closing Soon
 
Last month we opened up enrolments into the Bachelor of Counselling and Bachelor of Psychological Science, and already many of the available places have been filled.
 
But there are still places remaining.
 
Our unique learning model means you can earn-while-you-learn, so you don’t have to give up work to fit in your studies.
  • Get started with NO MONEY DOWN with government Fee-Help.
  • Study externally from anywhere in Australia, even overseas.
  • Residential Schools in Melbourne*, Sydney* and Brisbane.
  • [Psych] Save up to $40,000 on your qualification.
  • [Couns] Save up to $26,400 on your qualification.
  • Start with just 1 subject.
  • Online learning portal with access to all study materials, readings and video lectures.
  • [Psych] Accredited by the Australian Psychology Accreditation Council (APAC).
  • No minimum HSC or OP results required to gain entry.
  • Learn in a friendly, small group environment.
If you’re interested in pursuing a rewarding career in Counselling or Psychology, please submit your obligation free expression of interest.
 
Bachelor of Counselling: www.aipc.edu.au/degree 
 
Bachelor of Psychological Science here: www.aip.edu.au/degree
 
We expect to hit capacity enrolments for Semester 1 2013 very soon. So if you’re thinking about a career in psychology or counselling, please act now.
 
*Bachelor of Psychological Science - Residential Schools in Melbourne and Sydney are available for CORE subjects only.
 
Watch our 2013 TV ad – Bachelor of Counselling: www.aipc.net.au/tv2013
Watch our 2013 TV ad – Bachelor of Psychological Science: www.aip.edu.au/tv2013
 
Intothediploma
 
Diploma of Counselling - the HIGHEST standard of any accredited
Diploma in counselling available in Australia today!
 
AIPC’s Diploma of Counselling is a qualification that’s extremely well regarded in counselling circles across the country. Our graduates are highly sought after and earn the respect of their peers for their skills and problem solving abilities.
 
The Diploma is a Nationally Recognised Training Program under the Australian Qualifications Framework (the standards which all accredited qualifications are required to comply with). Upon graduation you’ll be qualified to immediately register with Australia’s leading member Association (Australian Counselling Association) as a registered and qualified counsellor.
 
The 18 Workbook course has been painstakingly developed and refined over 19 years in close consultation with industry leading professionals and employers of counsellors. Together with completing written workbooks, you also complete 11 practical days. This is where you’ll demonstrate your skills and apply what you’ve learnt in ‘real life’ counselling scenarios. You’ll find the experience extremely empowering and rewarding.
 
Of course, if you’re studying externally and can’t physically attend the practical days there are several alternate means to learn and apply these skills, including self-recording and web conferencing modes.
 
Want to find out more? Visit www.aipc.net.au/lz today!
 
Intomhss
 
Australia is suffering a Mental Health Crisis
 
Our suicide rate is now TWICE our road toll. Many suicides could possibly be averted, if only the people close to the victim were able to identify the early signs and appropriately intervene.
 
RIGHT NOW someone you care about – a family member, friend, or colleague – may be suffering in silence, and you don’t know.
 
With the right training, you can help that family member, friend or colleague.
 
Save $100 when you book your seat in an upcoming MHSS Workshop.
 
Upcoming workshops (February/March):
 
Adelaide (Glandore), SA: 16 & 17 February (call 08 8297 5111)
Robina (Gold Coast), QLD: 23 & 24 February
Canning Vale, WA: 28 February & 1 March
East Doncaster, VIC: 7 & 8 March
Lavington (Albury Wodonga), NSW: 18 & 19 March
 
Book your seat now: www.mhss.net.au/find-a-course
 
Your registration includes the 2-day facilitated workshop; a hardcopy of the MHSS Student Workbook; and access to an online dashboard where you can obtain your certificate, watch role-play videos, and much more.
 
MHSS Specialties
 
Once you complete the MHSS Core program you can undertake the MHSS Specialty Programs:
  1. Aiding Addicts;
  2. Supporting those with Depression or Anxiety;
  3. Supporting the Suicidal and Suicide Bereaved and;
  4. Supporting Challenged Families.
Book your seat at the next MHSS Workshop now and save $100.
 
If you have any queries, please contact Pedro Gondim on pedro@mhss.net.au.
 
PS Members of the ACA can accrue 28 OPD points by attending the MHSS Workshop.
 
Intocounselling
 
Understanding Shopping Addiction
 
Spending too much, too often, goes by several names: “shopping addiction”, “over-shopping” or “overspending”, “compulsive shopping”, and “oniomania”. People even designate themselves as “shopaholics”.
 
Definition
 
Donald Black, a doctor and professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, describes compulsive shopping and spending as “inappropriate, excessive, and out of control. Like other addictions, it basically has to do with impulsiveness and lack of control over one’s impulses.” He explains that, in the United States (and many would say, in most affluent western nations), shopping is embedded in the culture, so often impulsiveness comes out as excessive shopping (Hatfield, H., 2004).
 
Everyone needs to spend money sometimes, and at certain times of the year, such as the Christmas holidays, people are particularly prone to rack up bills as they try to find those perfect gifts for loved ones. But compulsive spenders behave in a way similar to other addicts. People who “shop til they drop” often run their credit cards up to the limit: not just once or twice a year, but frequently. They believe that if they bring home a good collection of packages they will feel better, but as with other drive (compulsion) disorders, compulsive shopping or shopping addiction makes a person feel worse.
 
A 2006 Stanford University study found that compulsive spending affects about six per cent of the population (17,000,000 in the United States), and that men and women suffer equally (Healthy Place, 2008).
 
Signs and symptoms
 
If you are extending support to someone who appears to be destroying their life with out-of-control spending, some questions you can ask them are:
  • Have you ever gone on a shopping spree or spent money because you were feeling disappointed, angry, or scared?
  • Are you ever upset after a shopping session, or when you are thinking about your spending habits? Have others been upset by your spending?
  • Have you had arguments with people close to you about your shopping or spending habits?
  • Do you sometimes feel lost or vulnerable going out without your credit cards?
  • Do you sometimes buy items on credit that you would not buy if you had to pay cash for them?
  • Do you often get a rush of euphoria, possibly mixed with anxiety, when you are spending money?
  • Do you feel guilty, ashamed, embarrassed, or confused after you have been shopping or spending money?
  • Have you ever lied to others, especially those close to you, about purchases you made or how much money you spent?
  • Do you think a lot of the time about money?
  • Have you ever had periods where you spent a lot of time juggling accounts or bills in order to accommodate your spending? (American Psychiatric Association, n.d.)
If the person you are supporting says “yes” to four or more of the above behaviours, they may have a problem with shopping or spending.
 
The maintaining cycle of (spending) compulsivity
 
Health professionals sometimes talk about “maintaining cycles”: that is, sets of behaviours which continue to repeat cyclically, despite the client’s expressed wish for them to end (Helen Palmer, communication to author, 1997). Let’s take a moment to show how these can occur with spending addiction.
 
The Cycle:
  1. The person feels “down”, angry, lonely, discouraged, or somehow “less than”.
  2. The person decides to go shopping (substitute “binge eat”, “have a sexual experience”, “get drunk”, “get high on drugs”, or “gamble”) in order to assuage the painful feelings.
  3. The shopping (or other) behaviour brings a feeling of happiness and power, temporarily chasing away the bad feelings. The person feels gratified.
  4. When the person comes off the shopping (or other) high, the painful feelings may return, probably even stronger than before.
  5. Because the shopping (or other) behaviour has been associated with pleasure and gratification, the person returns as soon as possible to the behaviour: meaning another spending spree (or drinking/drugs/gambling/sex/overeating session).
  6. The person again experiences the high, followed by after-effects of remorse, guilt, and other difficult emotions (on top of the now probably “squashed down” original bad feelings).
  7. In order to escape the difficult emotions, the person is driven even more strongly back to the spending (or other destructive) behaviour.
  8. As the habit develops, so does tolerance, where the brain chemistry re-wires itself to only allow the release of its “feel good” chemicals with higher and higher levels of the shopping behaviour: that is, more time and money spent on shopping (or gambling, eating, out-of-order sexual experiences, alcohol, or drugs).
  9. The price of maintaining/increasing the spending (or eating/drinking/drug-taking/ sex/gambling) “at all costs” becomes increasingly obvious: depleted bank accounts, ruined relationships, destroyed careers and unemployment, physical and mental health consequences, and legal trouble.
  10. The person felt bad about themselves before, but (back at Step 1 now for another run of the cycle) life is now unrelentingly unbearable. In full grip of the spending (or other) obsession/ addiction, the person must continue the cycle of “shopaholism” (or other behaviour) – that is, going onward to Step 2 -- doing it until physically unable; the cycle carries on.
Healing maintaining cycles: not a takeaway job
 
One of the counter-intuitive aspects of maintaining cycles is that they are not broken (healed) by taking away something. Addicts often lament, “Oh, if I could just have these cravings (or these bad feelings about myself, or these urges to gamble/ spend/ view pornography) taken away! Life, and conquering the addiction, would be so much easier.” It would seem so, but unfortunately in this case the ruling maxim is, “Nature hates a vacuum.” That is, if we take away parts of the cycle, there is a vacuum, which our psyche rushes to fill with something else, which may be equally undesirable. Surprisingly, the best way to get out of a maintaining cycle is to add something into it -- at some strategic step which interrupts the cycle.
 
Think about times when you may have been caught in a repetitive rut with behaviours you didn’t like in yourself, but which you somehow managed to keep repeating. It could be anything from setting up unhealthy relationships to a habit of procrastination to staying up late and then drinking too much coffee the next day. See if you can map out the steps in your cycle. Hint: you can start at any stage in the cycle and then keep adding “the next step”, writing each as the next point in a circle; when you see how your last step leads back into your first one (completing the circle), you have understood the cyclical nature of it. Once you can draw it as an infinite circle of behaviours, you can work out at which point in the circle you can be most effective at interrupting the cycle. You do this by adding in a behaviour (or attitude or belief).
 
You can think of it as a circle of dominoes placed equidistant from one another, but within reach of each other, in a circular pattern. When your maintaining cycle is in full swing, all you have to do (or all the addict has to do) is engage the action(s) at one stage of the cycle and the rest of the dominoes fall, one after the other. However, if you place a heavy block in between two of the dominoes, the domino right in front of the block will fall onto the block, but the weight of the block will hold it stationary, preventing the rest of the dominoes from falling.
 
Similarly, a weighty (strategic) action added into the cycle acts as the block, keeping the rest of the dominoes (compelled behaviours) from coming into play. Exercise: Draw a maintaining cycle of your own on a blank piece of paper. Once you have identified all the steps, have a go at coming up with a “block”: an interrupting action or attitude. Then make notes about what you have discovered.
 
Concluding thoughts
 
Research has shown that many compulsive spenders also suffer from mood disorders, substance abuse, or eating disorders: an unsurprising fact, given that we have just demonstrated how the regressive cycle of behaviour is the same for any of the addictions or compulsive behaviours. Often the extent of the financial damage is discovered only after the spender (drinker/ drug addict/ gambler, etc.) has accumulated a huge debt that requires a radical change in lifestyle to resolve (American Psychiatric Association, n.d.).
 
This article is an extract of the Mental Health Social Support Specialty “Aiding Addicts”. For more information on MHSS, visit www.mhss.net.au.
 
References:
 
American Psychiatric Association. (Undated). In: Shopping: What are warning signs of compulsive shopping and spending? Illinois Institute for Addiction Recovery: Proctor Hospital. Retrieved on 11 May, 2012, from: http://www.addictionrecov.org/Addictions/?AID=34
 
Hatfield, H. (2004). Shopping Spree, or Addiction? What happens when shopping spirals out of control, and in some cases, becomes an addiction? WebMD, Inc. Retrieved on 8 May, 2012, from: http://www.webmd.com/mental-health/features/shopping-spree-addiction?page=2
 
Healthy Place: Trusted mental health information. (2008). Addictions Community: Shopping addiction: over-shopping, compulsive shopping. Healthy Place: Trusted mental health information. Retrieved on 8 May, 2012, from: http://www.healthyplace.com/addictions/shopping-addiction/shopping-addiction-compulsive-shopping/
 
Join our community:
 
 
Intostories
 
Sandra Becham (South Australia)
 
I enrolled in the Diploma of Counselling course at the Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors and when the first pack of books arrived I was absolutely terrified. I hadn’t studied for years and was wondering how I was going to achieve a Diploma in Counselling.
 
I completed my first unit and handed it in, a year later. Then I attended the IN-CLASS STUDIES and came away with a greater insight into the units I was studying and I gained new friendships and study partners. The AIPC On-line Resource Centre is a valuable tool that I would use frequently.
 
I have finally come to the end of my study and want to thank the Staff and Management for their unconditional support and guidance. I am currently working on two study majors (Relationships and Conflict, Grief and Loss).
 
Now I am a qualified Counsellor I look forward working in the community where I can utilise my counselling knowledge and I want to also work in Case Management and run Groups. The Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors works at a high professional standard and I have decided to enrol in the Bachelor of Counselling in Semester 1, 2013
 
Carol, thank you so much. You are worth your weight in Gold.
 
Sandra Becham
AIPC Graduate
 
Watch inspirational stories from some of our Graduates: www.aipc.net.au/gradvideo
Hear what Employers say about our Graduates: www.aipc.net.au/employervids
 
Intobookstore
 
The Institute has a list of recommended textbooks and DVDs that can add great value to your learning journey - and the good news is that you can purchase them very easily. The AIPC bookstore will give you discounted prices, an easy ordering method and quality guarantee!
 
This fortnight's feature is...
 
Name: Psychology 8th edition package
Authors: Wade, C. and Travis, Carol
AIPC Code: WADE
AIPC Price: $101.65 (RRP $112.95)
ISBN: 978-013-192-6844
 
This book defines models and practices critical and scientific thinking.
 
To order this book, contact your Student Support Centreor the AIPC Head Office (1800 657 667).
 
Intoarticles
 
Signs and Symptoms of Compulsive Eating
 
Also referred to as “food addiction” and “binge-eating disorder” (BED), compulsive overeating is characterised by an obsessive-compulsive relationship to food. This condition is not only manifested by abnormal (amount of) food intake, but also by the intake and craving for foods that are, in themselves, harmful to the individual.
 
People suffering from this disorder engage in frequent episodes of uncontrolled eating, or binge eating, during which they may feel out of control, often consuming food in frenzy, past the point of being comfortably full. The binge is usually followed by feelings of guilt, shame, and depression. In order to feel better about themselves, binge eaters will surrender to cravings with another binge, which they hope will numb out the bad feelings; thus, the cycle repeats itself.
 
Click here to continue reading this article.
 
 
A Guide to Helping the Suicide-Bereaved
 
How can you best offer support to someone who is bereaved by suicide? What attitudes, translated into caring actions, can best facilitate the bereaved person’s coping in the immediate and short term, and their healing in the longer term? Because of the remaining societal stigma and also the lack of knowledge about how to be with the suicide-bereaved in a sensitive way, many friends and even family members simply avoid the situation – including the bereaved person – altogether. So how can you help? What is your best role as support person? Below is a guide to clarify what you can do to help the suicide-bereaved.
 
Click here to continue reading this article.
 
Other articles: www.aipc.net.au/articles
 
Intodevelopment
 
Get access to the largest range of CPD courses and video workshops...
By some of the world's leading mental health experts
 
Mental Health Academy (MHA) is the largest provider of continuing professional development (CPD) education for the mental health industry in Australia.
 
Mental Health Academy programs have been specially developed by psychologist and counsellor educators. These high quality educational programs can provide you with insight into how you got to this point in your life, how to heal, and how best to move forward. They cover a range of key areas that can assist you – or those you love – throughout your life journey.
 
Program areas include:
  • Conflict & Mediation
  • Stress Management
  • Relationships
  • Grief & Loss
  • Children & Adolescents
  • Multicultural Issues
  • Communication Skills
  • Addictions
  • Bullying
  • Mental Health Disorders
  • Counselling Therapies
  • Incident & Trauma
  • And much more.
Some benefits becoming a Mental Health Academy member:
  • Unlimited access to over 100 courses and videos
  • New courses and videos released every month
  • Online, 24/7 access to resources
  • Tailored student dashboard with access to history and account details
  • Branded certificates available for every course or video you complete
  • CPD points/ hours for counsellors, psychologists and social workers
  • Plus much more.
Learn more and join today: www.mentalhealthacademy.com.au
 
Intoconnection
 
Have you visited theCounselling Connection Blog yet? There are over 600 interesting posts including case studies, profiles, success stories, videos and much more. Make sure you too get connected (and thank you for those who have already submitted comments and suggestions).
 
A dilemma on confidentiality
 
You work as a counsellor for an organisation that offers counselling services to the general public. The free service is aimed at community members who cannot afford counselling services otherwise. You start counselling a young man who made an appointment with the service when he saw the advertisement in the local community newspaper.
 
In your initial session you learn that he is 16 years old and sought counselling on his own without the knowledge of his parents. He tells you confidentiality is very important to him and he doesn’t want his parents to know he is in counselling. He tells you that he is afraid his parents might ridicule him for this if they find out since they have ridiculed him about other things in the past. He says he struggles with motivation, getting out of bed in the morning and has low self-esteem. He also says he doesn’t even feel like seeing his friends anymore. He wants to address these issues with you in counselling.
 
What do you do in this case? What are the ethical issues you need to consider?
 
Click here to read responses from professionals, and to share your own comments.
 
Get new posts delivered by email! Visit our FeedBurner subscription page and click the link on the subscription box.
 
 
Intotwitter
 
Follow us on Twitter and get the latest and greatest in counselling news. To follow, visit http://twitter.com/counsellingnews and click "Follow".
 
Featured Tweets
 
 
 
AIPC Article Library » Challenges of Same-Sex Couple Families: http://www.aipc.net.au/articles/?p=342
 
 
The fight against bullying: A new professional’s perspective: http://ct.counseling.org/2013/02/the-fight-against-bullying-a-new-professionals-perspective/
 
 
Note that you need a Twitter profile to follow a list. If you do not have one yet, visit http://twitter.com to create a free profile today!
 
Tweet Count: 3854
Follower Count: 5449
 
Intoquotes
 
"Inspirations never go in for long engagements; they demand immediate marriage to action."
 
~ Brendan Francis
 
Intoseminars
 
Many students of the Diploma of Counselling attend seminars to complete the practical requirements of their course. Seminars provide an ideal opportunity to network with other students and liaise with qualified counselling professionals in conjunction with completing compulsory coursework.
 
Not sure if you need to attend Seminars? Click here for information on Practical Assessments.
 
Below are upcoming seminars available during the first semester of 2013. For a full list of seminars, visit http://www.aipc.net.au/timetables.php.
 
To register for a seminar, please contact your Student Support Centre.
 
BRISBANE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 06/04, 15/06
Communication Skills II - 09/02, 23/03, 18/05
The Counselling Process - 23-24/02, 27-28/04, 29-30/06
Counselling Therapies I - 16-17/03, 22-23/06
Counselling Therapies II - 13-14/04
Case Management - 2-3/03, 25-26/05
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 17/02, 16/06
Counselling Applications - 24/03
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 23-24/02, 27-28/04, 29-30/06
Communication Skills I - 06/04, 15/06
Communication Skills II - 09/02, 23/03, 18/05
Counselling Therapies I - 16-17/03, 22-23/06
Counselling Therapies II - 13-14/04
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 10/03, 02/06
Family Therapy - 07/04, 07/06
Case Management - 2-3/03, 25-26/05
 
GOLD COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 25/05
Communication Skills II - 26/05
The Counselling Process - 16-17/03, 29-30/06
Counselling Therapies I - 02-03/03
Counselling Therapies II - 18-19/05
Case Management - 15-16/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 20/04
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 16-17/03, 29-30/06
Communication Skills I - 25/05
Communication Skills II - 26/05
Counselling Therapies I - 02-03/03
Counselling Therapies II - 18-19/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 06/04
Family Therapy - 08/06
Case Management - 15-16/06
 
MELBOURNE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 09/02, 09/03, 27/04, 18/05, 29/06
Communication Skills II - 10/02, 10/03, 28/04, 19/05, 30/06
The Counselling Process - 15-16/02, 22-23/03, 20-21/04, 25-26/05, 21-22/06
Counselling Therapies I - 16-17/03, 13-14/04, 04-05/05, 22-23/06
Counselling Therapies II - 09-10/02, 09-10/03, 06-07/04, 18-19/05, 08-09/06
Case Management - 23-24/02, 13-14/04, 15-16/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 24/03, 02/06
Counselling Applications - 03/03, 12/05
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 15-16/02, 22-23/03, 20-21/04, 25-26/05, 21-22/06
Communication Skills I - 09/02, 09/03, 27/04, 18/05, 29/06
Communication Skills II - 10/02, 10/03, 28/04, 19/05, 30/06
Counselling Therapies I - 16-17/03, 13-14/04, 04-05/05, 22-23/06
Counselling Therapies II - 09-10/02, 09-10/03, 06-07/04, 18-19/05, 08-09/06
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 17/02, 11/05
Case Management - 23-24/02, 13-14/04, 15-16/06
 
NORTHERN TERRITORY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 09/02, 11/05
Communication Skills II - 02/03, 01/06
The Counselling Process - 23-24/03, 29-30-06
Counselling Therapies I - 23-24/02
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/04
Case Management - 16-17/02, 15-16/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 06/04
Counselling Applications - 20/05
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 23-24/03, 29-30-06
Communication Skills I - 09/02, 11/05
Communication Skills II - 02/03, 01/06
Counselling Therapies I - 23-24/02
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/04
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 16/03
Family Therapy - 27/4
Counselling Applications - 20/05
 
SOUTH AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 23/02, 13/04, 29/06
Communication Skills II - 24/02, 14/04, 30/06
The Counselling Process - 06-07/04, 01-02/06
Counselling Therapies I - 02-03/03, 15-16/06
Counselling Therapies II - 18-19/05
Case Management - 16-17/02, 25-26/05
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 10/02, 23/06
Counselling Applications - 16/03
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 06-07/04, 01-02/06
Communication Skills I - 23/02, 13/04, 29/06
Communication Skills II - 24/02, 14/04, 30/06
Counselling Therapies I - 02-03/03, 15-16/06
Counselling Therapies II - 18-19/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 23/03
Family Therapy - 17/03, 22/06
Case Management - 16-17/02, 25-26/05
 
SUNSHINE COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 16/02, 18/05
Communication Skills II - 16/03, 22/06
The Counselling Process - 26-27/04
Counselling Therapies I - 22-23/03
Counselling Therapies II - 24-25/05
Case Management - 01-02/03
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 26-27/04
Communication Skills I - 16/02, 18/05
Communication Skills II - 16/03, 22/06
Counselling Therapies I - 22-23/03
Counselling Therapies II - 24-25/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 14/06
Family Therapy - 21/06
Case Management - 01-02/03
 
SYDNEY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 08/02, 22/03, 19/04, 20/05, 22/06
Communication Skills II - 14/02, 23/03, 26/04, 21/05, 29/06
The Counselling Process - 06-07/02, 22-23/02, 15-16/03, 08-09/04, 29-30/04, 17-18/05, 20-21/06
Counselling Therapies I - 18-19/03, 10-11/05, 19-20/06
Counselling Therapies II - 15-16/02, 11-12/04, 24-25/06
Case Management - 20-21/02, 03-04/05
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 01/03
Counselling Applications - 02/03
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 06-07/02, 22-23/02, 15-16/03, 08-09/04, 29-30/04, 17-18/05, 20-21/06
Communication Skills I - 08/02, 22/03, 19/04, 20/05, 22/06
Communication Skills II - 14/02, 23/03, 26/04, 21/05, 29/06
Counselling Therapies I - 18-19/03, 10-11/05, 19-20/06
Counselling Therapies II - 15-16/02, 11-12/04, 24-25/06
Family Therapy - 18/02, 07/05
Case Management - 20-21/02, 03-04/05
 
TASMANIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 10/02, 05/05
Communication Skills II - 03/03, 02/06
The Counselling Process - 23-24/03, 29-30/06
Counselling Therapies I - 23-24/02, 29-30/06
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/04
Case Management - 16-17/02, 15-16/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 07/04
Counselling Applications - 03/02, 19/05
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 23-24/03, 29-30/06
Communication Skills I - 10/02, 05/05
Communication Skills II - 03/03, 02/06
Counselling Therapies I - 23-24/02, 29-30/06
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/04
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 17/03
Family Therapy - 28/04  
Case Management - 16-17/02, 15-16/06
 
WESTERN AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 09/02, 09/03, 25/05, 22/06
Communication Skills II - 10/02, 10/03, 26/05, 23/06
The Counselling Process - 16-17/02, 16-17/03, 13-14/04, 11-12/05, 15-16/06
Counselling Therapies I - 06-07/04, 08-09/06
Counselling Therapies II - 23-24/02, 04-05/05
Case Management - 18-19/05
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 21/04
Counselling Applications - 23/03
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 16-17/02, 16-17/03, 13-14/04, 11-12/05, 15-16/06
Communication Skills I - 09/02, 09/03, 25/05, 22/06
Communication Skills II - 10/02, 10/03, 26/05, 23/06
Counselling Therapies I - 06-07/04, 08-09/06
Counselling Therapies II - 23-24/02, 04-05/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 01/06
Family Therapy - 20/04
Case Management - 18-19/05
 
Important Note: Advertising of the dates above does not guarantee availability of places in the seminar. Please check availability with the respective Student Support Centre.
 
 
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