In this Issue

Hello!
Intobachelor
Intothediploma
Intoreview
Intomhss
Intopractice
Intocounselling
Intostories
Intocommunity
Intobookstore
Intoarticles
Intodevelopment
Intoconnection
Intotwitter
Intoquotes
Intoseminars

Contact us

Publications

Editor: Sandra Poletto
Email: ezine@aipc.net.au
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Copyright: 2012 Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors

Hello!
Welcome to Edition 173 of Institute Inbrief. Also referred to as “food addiction” and “binge-eating disorder” (BED), compulsive overeating is characterised by an obsessive-compulsive relationship to food. This condition is not only manifested by abnormal (amount of) food intake, but also by the intake and craving for foods that are, in themselves, harmful to the individual. In this edition, we look at signs, symptoms and the underlying biochemistry of food addiction.
 
Also in this edition:
  • Bachelor of Counselling and Psychological Science – Closing Soon
  • A Message from our CEO
  • MHSS Workshops
  • Graduate story
  • Blog and Twitter updates
  • 2013 seminar dates
Office closure dates
 
Each of the Institute Student Support Centres will be closing for a short break over the Christmas and New Year period. Hopefully you will be able to a take a bit of a break too and put your studies aside for a little rest and relaxation over the festive season.
 
During the holiday season Head Office will be accepting completed assessments however you will need to allow a little extra time for their return.
 
Please remember that if you are receiving Centrelink benefits whilst you are completing your course, you will need to submit your assessments in accordance with the due dates on your Course Outline.
 
Institute Student Support Centre (except for Regional QLD which will be closed from Thursday 13th of December) will be closed from Friday 21st December at 12pm. All centres will re-open on Monday 7th of January 2013 at 9am.
 
Enjoy your reading,
 
 
Editor.
 
 
Join our community:
 
 
Help those around you suffering mental illness in silence: www.mhss.net.au
 
Intobachelor
 
Bachelor of Counselling and Bachelor of Psychological Science
Limited Places for the Semester 1, 2013 Intake – Closing Soon
 
Last month we opened up enrolments into the Bachelor of Counselling and Bachelor of Psychological Science, and already many of the available places have been filled.
 
But there are still places remaining.
 
Our unique learning model means you can earn-while-you-learn, so you don’t have to give up work to fit in your studies.
  • Get started with NO MONEY DOWN with government Fee-Help.
  • Study externally from anywhere in Australia, even overseas.
  • Residential Schools in Melbourne*, Sydney* and Brisbane.
  • [Psych] Save up to $40,000 on your qualification.
  • [Couns] Save up to $26,400 on your qualification.
  • Start with just 1 subject.
  • Online learning portal with access to all study materials, readings and video lectures.
  • [Psych] Accredited by the Australian Psychology Accreditation Council (APAC).
  • No minimum HSC or OP results required to gain entry.
  • Learn in a friendly, small group environment.
If you’re interested in pursuing a rewarding career in Counselling or Psychology, please submit your obligation free expression of interest.
 
Bachelor of Counselling: www.aipc.edu.au/degree 
 
Bachelor of Psychological Science here: www.aip.edu.au/degree
 
We expect to hit capacity enrolments for Semester 1 2013 very soon. So if you’re thinking about a career in psychology or counselling, please act now.
 
*Bachelor of Psychological Science - Residential Schools in Melbourne and Sydney are available for CORE subjects only.
 
Watch our 2013 TV ad – Bachelor of Counselling: www.aipc.net.au/tv2013
Watch our 2013 TV ad – Bachelor of Psychological Science: www.aip.edu.au/tv2013
 
Intothediploma
 
Diploma of Counselling - the HIGHEST standard of any accredited
Diploma in counselling available in Australia today!
 
AIPC’s Diploma of Counselling is a qualification that’s extremely well regarded in counselling circles across the country. Our graduates are highly sought after and earn the respect of their peers for their skills and problem solving abilities.
 
The Diploma is a Nationally Recognised Training Program under the Australian Qualifications Framework (the standards which all accredited qualifications are required to comply with). Upon graduation you’ll be qualified to immediately register with Australia’s leading member Association (Australian Counselling Association) as a registered and qualified counsellor.
 
The 18 Workbook course has been painstakingly developed and refined over 19 years in close consultation with industry leading professionals and employers of counsellors. Together with completing written workbooks, you also complete 11 practical days. This is where you’ll demonstrate your skills and apply what you’ve learnt in ‘real life’ counselling scenarios. You’ll find the experience extremely empowering and rewarding.
 
Of course, if you’re studying externally and can’t physically attend the practical days there are several alternate means to learn and apply these skills, including self-recording and web conferencing modes.
 
Want to find out more? Visit www.aipc.net.au/lz today!
 
Intoreview
 
A Message from the CEO
 
Hello everyone, as we come to the end of another year, it’s important to reflect on some of our wonderful achievements this year. Congratulations to all of our Graduates whom have finished their courses during 2012. It has been a pleasure assisting you with your studies and your achievements make it worthwhile for all of us here at the Institute. After all, assisting students to finish their studies and progress onto exciting opportunities is what we are here to do! Your tenacity, commitment and dedication to finish your courses are an inspiration!
 
2012 was the inaugural year for our Bachelor of Psychological Science. Our first group of students enrolled in Semester 1, and then our second cohort in Semester 2. We are looking forward to rolling out the second year Psychology subjects in 2013, and having more students join the program. 
 
We are regularly looking for ways to improve accessibility to quality education for our students. One of our latest developments this year is the introduction of Residential Schools in Melbourne and Sydney for the Bachelor of Counselling and Core subjects in the Bachelor of Psychological Science. This means that new higher education students who live inter-state have the option of attending Residential Schools in these locations, rather than travelling to Brisbane. We hope this will make it a little easier, and more affordable, for higher education students studying with us.
 
During 2012, we also updated and re-accredited our Vocational Graduate Diploma of Counselling with the revised qualification coming available in September. Graduates of our Vocational Graduate Diploma courses satisfy the education requirements for membership of the respective ACA Professional Colleges. For more information, visit www.aipc.net.au/vgd.
 
2012 has also seen me reach 10 years of employment with the Institute; 10 years which I have enjoyed immensely. I look back over the last 10 years with affection and enjoy reflecting on how we have evolved and grown as an educational institute over this time because of the valuable contributions of every single staff member. However, while we now offer a range of programs in the vocational training, higher education and professional development sectors, there is one thing that has not changed with us. And that is the commitment of the Institute and our staff in creating a positive and flexible educational experience to assist our students in reaching their goal of graduating from their course.
 
There are a number of staff members whom I would also like to acknowledge in being employed or affiliated with the Institute for many, many years. They are: 
  • Russell Reeves (Private Assessor and Seminar Presenter – NSW)
  • Toula Gordillo (Private Assessor – QLD)
  • Sandra Johnson (Seminar Presenter and Facilitator – NSW)
  • David Hayden (former Diploma graduate, Private Assessor and Seminar Presenter – TAS), and,
  • Stacey Lloyd (Seminar Presenter and Marker – QLD) (You will actually get to see a little more of Stacey on the Diploma Online Resource Centre next year as she has just finished recording a series of videos for the Diploma of Counselling Workbooks. These videos will be a useful resource for students to watch while working through their workbooks.)
There are also a few staff members whom have gone above and beyond the requirements of their positions this year, and we would like to acknowledge their contribution through a Special Appreciation Award. They are:
  • Brona Nic Giolla Easpaig (Lecturer – Higher Education) 
  • Navvii Lingam (Student Support Officer – Higher Education)
  • Melissa Wishart (Project Officer – Vocational Training)
Congratulations to all of these staff members whom have contributed significantly to the educational experience of our students. Best wishes for a wonderful festive season. I hope you all have a special time with your families and friends, and we’ll see you in 2013!
 
Sandra Poletto – AIPC CEO.
 
Intomhss
 
Australia is suffering a Mental Health Crisis
 
Our suicide rate is now TWICE our road toll. Many suicides could possibly be averted, if only the people close to the victim were able to identify the early signs and appropriately intervene.
 
RIGHT NOW someone you care about – a family member, friend, or colleague – may be suffering in silence, and you don’t know.
 
With the right training, you can help that family member, friend or colleague.
 
Save $100 when you book your seat in an upcoming MHSS Workshop:
 
 
Your registration includes the 2-day facilitated workshop; a hardcopy of the MHSS Student Workbook; and access to an online dashboard where you can obtain your certificate, watch role-play videos, and much more.
 
MHSS Specialties
 
Once you complete the MHSS Core program you can undertake the MHSS Specialty Programs:
  1. Aiding Addicts;
  2. Supporting those with Depression or Anxiety;
  3. Supporting the Suicidal and Suicide Bereaved and;
  4. Supporting Challenged Families.
Book your seat at the next MHSS Workshop now and save $100.
 
If you have any queries, please contact Pedro Gondim on pedro@mhss.net.au.
 
PS Members of the ACA can accrue 28 OPD points by attending the MHSS Workshop.
 
Intopractice
 
ACA 2 x 1 Day Workshops
 
Presented by Philip Armstrong, CEO of the Australian Counselling Association.
 
Build a Private Practice - Basic Foundations (workshop 10am to 4pm)
 
Ins and outs of starting a practice, this workshop will look at issues related to setting up a practice:
  • Identifying Competition
  • Naming and Branding
  • Positioning
  • Costs
  • Policies and Procedures
  • Location
  • Business structures
  • Business Plan
  • Note taking
  • Insurance
  • Documentation
  • Confidentiality issues
  • I.T.
  • Business Cards
  • Basics of Marketing
Dates: Sydney (31/01/13), Melbourne (04/02/13), Brisbane (11/02/13), Adelaide (04/03/13)
 
Private Practice - Marketing Master Class
 
Get it right the first time to succeed and grow. This Master class focuses on strategies related to:
  • Marketing a non-tangible service
  • Butterfly Effect
  • Brochure and Printing design rules
  • How to identify trends & new markets
  • Niche markets - tomorrows market for allied health providers
  • Marketing fallacies - what's true and what's not
  • Keeping Clients - being good is not good enough on its own
  • Advertising - what works and what doesn't
Dates: Sydney (01/02/13), Melbourne (05/02/13), Brisbane (12/02/13), Adelaide (054/03/13)
 
Investment:
 
Non ACA member: 1 x day = $350.00, both days = $600.00
Register before 4pm Friday December 21st 2012: Early bird: $500 for both days
Includes: Tea/Coffee & a PDF copy of PP presentation. BYO Lunches.
 
This is an ACA activity and all ACA participants will receive 12 OPD points per activity.
 
For more information and to register, email jovana@theaca.net.au.
 
Intocounselling
 
Signs and Symptoms of Compulsive Eating
 
Also referred to as “food addiction” and “binge-eating disorder” (BED), compulsive overeating is characterised by an obsessive-compulsive relationship to food. This condition is not only manifested by abnormal (amount of) food intake, but also by the intake and craving for foods that are, in themselves, harmful to the individual.
 
People suffering from this disorder engage in frequent episodes of uncontrolled eating, or binge eating, during which they may feel out of control, often consuming food in frenzy, past the point of being comfortably full. The binge is usually followed by feelings of guilt, shame, and depression. In order to feel better about themselves, binge eaters will surrender to cravings with another binge, which they hope will numb out the bad feelings; thus, the cycle repeats itself.
 
Compulsive eating is less well-known than the eating disorders of anorexia nervosa or bulimia, and it can be differentiated from bulimia, which also involves binge eating, by the fact that binge eaters do not attempt to compensate for their bingeing with vomiting, fasting, or laxative use. People with this disorder also engage in grazing, during which they return to consume small amounts of food throughout the day. While each incident of grazing may not involve a lot of food, it adds up over the course of the day. Altogether, compulsive overeaters may eat between 5000 and 15,000 calories per day, resulting in a temporary release from psychological stress through an addictive high not unlike that experienced through drug abuse. (All About Life Challenges, 2012; Wikipedia, 2012).
 
Signs and symptoms of compulsive eating and/or food addiction
 
People caught up in this disease exhibit a wide array of symptoms. If you are supporting a compulsive eater through a treatment and recovery process, or even just trying to get them into treatment, it is important for you to know that many of the signs are not observable by you or anyone else; they are occurring either in secret (because the food addict needs it to be that way), or else they are happening as feelings or sensations inside the addict. The person:
  1. Is obsessed with thoughts about food
  2. “Comfort eats” in order to relieve stress or worry
  3. Eats much more rapidly than normal (so that they can eat more)
  4. Eats alone or hides food in order to eat in secret due to shame and embarrassment
  5. Eats very little in public, but maintains a high body weight
  6. Feels guilty due to overeating, and/or eats more than intended to when began
  7. Feels sluggish or lethargic from overeating
  8. Binge eats or eats uncontrollably even when not physically hungry
  9. Eats everything on the plate, even when full
  10. Goes on a food binge after dieting or trying to cut back
  11. Eats until feeling sick
  12. Feels anxious while eating, which results in more eating
  13. Does not like to feel hunger
  14. Gets depressed or has mood swings
  15. May be aware that eating patterns are abnormal
  16. Is preoccupied with body weight
  17. Over time, has felt the need to eat more and more to get the desired emotional state
  18. Has experienced withdrawal when cutting down/out certain foods (not including caffeine)
  19. Experiences rapid weight gain or seemingly sudden obesity
  20. Has a history of weight fluctuations
  21. Has difficulty moving around due to weight gain
  22. Sometimes consumes certain foods so often or in such large quantities that spends time dealing with negative emotions instead of working, spending time with family or friends, or engaging in other important or enjoyed activities
  23. Has withdrawn from activities because of embarrassment about weight
  24. Has a history of many unsuccessful diets
  25. Has low self-esteem and (therefore) feels the need to eat greater and greater amounts
  26. Sees food as something to be avoided, harmful (All About Life Challenges, 2012).
(Wikipedia, 2012; Gearhardt, A.N., Corbin, W.R., and Brownell, K.D., 2009).
 
Food addiction: the underlying biochemistry
 
For many years, overeating and obesity were frequently diagnosed as eating disorders and thus treated as emotional disorders that could be overcome merely by “talk therapy” (counselling). Recently, however, researchers have been able to establish that some food substances trigger cravings with an underlying biochemistry similar to the cravings that an alcoholic has for alcohol. Those trigger foods are typically refined carbohydrates, sugar and artificial sweeteners, fatty foods, and processed foods. They affect the same addictive brain pathways that alcohol and drugs influence. Here are some of the latest scientific findings confirming that food can be addictive:
  1. Sugar stimulates the brain’s reward centers through the neurotransmitter dopamine precisely like other addictive drugs.
  2. High-sugar and high-fat foods work just like heroin, opium, or morphine in the brain, according to brain imagining scans.
  3. Such scans also show that obese people and drug addicts have lower numbers of dopamine receptors, making them more likely to crave things that boost dopamine (e.g., sugar).
  4. Foods high in fat and sweets stimulate the release of the body’s own opioids (chemicals like morphine) in the brain.
  5. Drugs used to block the brain’s receptors for heroin and morphine also reduce the consumption of and preference for sweet, high-fat foods in both normal weight and obese binge eaters.
  6. People (and rats) develop a tolerance to sugar, needing more and more of it to satisfy themselves, just like addicts do for drugs such as alcohol or heroin.
  7. Obese people, just like drug addicts or alcoholics, continue to ingest large amounts of their substance (unhealthy foods for the food addict) despite debilitating health, occupational, personal, and relational consequences.
  8. Animals and humans experience “withdrawal” when suddenly cut off from sugar, just like addicts do when detoxifying from drugs.
  9. Just as with drugs, after an initial period of enjoying the foods, the compulsive eater no longer consumes them to get high, but to feel normal (Hyman, M., 2011).
These findings have been demonstrated by food addicts who participated in 30 to 90-day residential treatment programs, only to resume eating “a small amount” of their trigger foods. In most cases, the program participants were soon back to full-fledged compulsive eating. This phenomenon has been likened to the alcoholic being told to have a small glass of wine. Probably, the alcoholic needs to abstain forever from the wine, and so does the food addict from the trigger food (Obesity and Food Addiction Summit, 2009).
 
According to Kay Shepherd, a pioneer in the treatment of food addiction, it is also like alcoholism in that it is a chronic, progressive, fatal disease:
  • Chronic, because the condition never goes away;
  • Progressive, because it gets worse over time (the compulsive overeater needs larger and larger amounts of the trigger foods to release the feel-good chemicals);
  • Fatal, because of the many complications related to the addiction, including obesity, Type II diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, sleep apnoea, depression, kidney disease, arthritis, bone deterioration, and stroke (Obesity and Food Addiction Summit, 2009).
Asleep at the plate: the experiences of binge eaters
 
If this talk about becoming addicted to food – a substance we need in order to survive – has you worried, have a heart for the compulsive eater. One of the problems binge eaters frequently experience is night time eating. In their total preoccupation with food, those with BED have been known to leave their bed in the wee hours of the morning, wandering into the kitchen in a trance-like state to have another binge.
 
Sometimes binge eaters do not know until the next morning (when they see the food wrappings and empty containers) whether what they experienced was a dream or a sad reality. They feel their most vulnerable to binges when they are alone, and most report that, once a binge has begun, it is virtually impossible to stop it, or even slow down the event. Because of the huge volatility this disease creates with blood sugar levels (wild spikes followed by massive let-downs), BED-affected individuals’ brains are adversely affected, and they often suffer severe fatigue (Natenshon, A., 2006).
 
Useful resources
 
Below are useful links to further information on compulsive eating/ Binge Eating Disorder.
  1. Obesity and Food Addiction Summit
  2. Paper: Obesity in Australia: a need for urgent action
  3. Dr Mark Hyman: Food Addiction
  4. Empowered Parents site: Binge Eating Disorder: Symptoms and remedies
  5. All About Life Challenges: Food addiction Symptoms
  6. Binge eating disorder to be recognized in the DSM-V
This article is an extract of the upcoming Mental Health Social Support Specialty “Aiding Addicts”. For more information on MHSS, visit www.mhss.net.au.
 
References:
 
All about life challenges. (2012). Food addiction. All about life challenges. Retrieved on 30 April, 2012, from: http://www.allaboutlifechallenges.org/food-addiction-symptoms-faq.htm
 
American Psychiatric Association. (2000). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (fourth edition, text revision. Washington D.C.: American Psychiatric Association.
 
American Psychiatric Association. (2000). Quick reference to the diagnostic criteria from DSMIV-TR. Washington, D.C.: American Psychiatric Association.
 
Drug and Alcohol Rehab Asia. (2012a) Alcoholism explained. Drug and Alcohol Rehab Asia. Retrieved on 7 May, 2012 from: http://alcoholrehab.com/alcohol-rehab/alcoholism-explained/
 
Drug and Alcohol Rehab Asia. (2012b) What to expect in advanced recovery. Drug and Alcohol Rehab Asia. Retrieved on 21 May, 2012 from: http://alcoholrehab.com/alcohol-rehab/what-toexpect-in-advanced-recovery/
 
Gearhardt, A.N., Corbin, W.R., and Brownell, K.D. (2009). Primary validation of the Yale Food Addiction Scale. Appetite. 52 (2): 430-436.
 
Hyman, M. (2011). Food addiction: Could it explain why 70 per cent of America is fat? Dr Hyman.com. Retrieved on 7 May, 2012, from: http://drhyman.com/blog/conditions/food-addiction-could-it-explain-why-70-percent-of-america-is-fat/
 
Natenshon, A. (2006). Binge eating disorder (compulsive overeating): Symptoms and remedies. The experience of the binge eater. Empowered parents.com. Retrieved on 30 April, 2012, from: http://www.empoweredparents.com/1eatingdisorders/binge.htm
 
Obesity and Food Addiction Summit. (2009). Food addiction: what is food addiction? Obesity and Food Addiction Summit. Island Wood, Bainbridge Island, Washington. Retrieved on 7 May, 2012, from: http://www.foodaddictionsummit.org/foodaddiction.htm
 
Wikipedia. (2012). Compulsive overeating. Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. Retrieved on 30 April, 2012, from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compulsive_overeating
 
Join our community:
 
 
Intostories
 
Kaye Crerar (Regional QLD)
 
My story began as the 5th child of 13 children when circumstances beyond my control caused me to receive only grade 3 Primary education. For 50 years the shame and grief caused me to blame myself, so much so that I never spoke about it to anyone, other than some family members, and began to secretly educate myself with a Dictionary and many books.
 
The Diploma of Counselling course was given to me as a 60th Birthday gift by my daughter after I plucked up the courage to share my story with her. It was a beautiful gesture and I agreed to do it feeling it may ward-off dementia and I'd learn how to help people in the correct manner.
 
A couple of months later, after getting a few questions wrong in Workbook 2 negative thoughts made me decide I was a failure and sent all my Workbooks back. Luckily Peter Kesper phoned me to inquire as to what was the problem. I decided to be honest by stating "I have not had the education to proceed further" then Peter said "tell me about it?"
 
That began the most changing day in my life as I felt the burden lift from my shoulders. I was grateful when Peter informed me that I had passed Workbook 2, while adding he felt I had the ability to succeed. He then proceeded to instil belief, by reminding me of my strengths. I agreed for him to mail my Workbooks back to me.
 
I then tried new strategies, e.g. changing study times and my behaviour to positive thought patterns, and I colour coded my Readings as I studied them, with the brightest colour meaning - the most important, this was beneficial as it helped me memorise the content, and it also provided for easy reference.
 
It took me 18 months to complete 18 Units. The interaction with other students at the Practical Seminars was very enjoyable, as it helped me gain confidence. The writing and study helped me grow as a person, and not be judgemental, as I grieved, forgave and healed.
 
Since attaining my Diploma of Counselling, I have commenced further study with an Advanced Study Major in Grief and Loss Counselling, and I now intend to go into private practice.
 
Kaye Crerar,
AIPC Graduate.
 
Watch inspirational stories from some of our Graduates: www.aipc.net.au/gradvideo
Hear what Employers say about our Graduates: www.aipc.net.au/employervids
 
Intocommunity
 
“Be Alert... The World Needs More Lerts”
 
Lert is a national organisation of members – everyday folk – that are collectively interested in supporting our communities understand and overcome the issues of mental health.
 
Lerts are not necessarily mental health professionals. Anyone can be a Lert. Lerts are ordinary folk with an extraordinary vision of dramatically reducing the onset of mental illness through early intervention, education and community engagement.
 
Lerts share a willingness to help their communities and workplaces address the systemic problem of mental illness. They’re involved in educating their communities and workplaces about mental illness, breaking down stigma’s, implementing early intervention models, promoting support structures and much more.
 
Lerts:
  • Are sensitive to the mental health wellbeing of their family, friends and community.
  • Provide a social support through provision of education and awareness.
  • Can deliver mental health related training.
  • Can act as Lert Officers in their workplace.
  • Can be trained in Mental Health Social Support to act as a conduit of support and referral.
  • Can join and operate local Chapters to influence mental health services and education in their community.
  • Engage with local ‘centres of influence’ such as workplaces, community centres, schools, Medicare Locals, GP’s and primary health centres, and more.
  • Network with health professionals and support structures.
  • Undertake awareness programs.
  • Plus much more.
Learn more and join Lert today: www.lert.com.au/lz 
 
Like Lert Facebook here: www.facebook.com/RUaLert
Follow Lert Twitter here: www.twitter.com/RUaLert
 
Intobookstore
 
The Institute has a list of recommended textbooks and DVDs that can add great value to your learning journey - and the good news is that you can purchase them very easily. The AIPC bookstore will give you discounted prices, an easy ordering method and quality guarantee!
 
This fortnight's feature is...
 
Name: The Resilient Practitioner
Authors: Skovholt, Thomas
AIPC Code: SKOVHOLT
AIPC Price: $65.65 (RRP $72.95)
ISBN: 978-020-530-6114
 
Skovholt gives clear explanations of practitioner stress and provides remedies that can be implemented. Caring professionals will find this book to be a rich resource of encouragement for professional development.
 
To order this book, contact your Student Support Centre or the AIPC Head Office (1800 657 667).
 
Intoarticles
 
Helping Clients Deal with Narcissists
 
This article focuses on how practitioners can assist clients in dealing with narcissists. You will be introduced to some of the “positive traits” that make narcissists attractive at first sight. You will also learn the criteria for Self-Defeating Personality Disorder (SDPD) and get a range of “survival tips” to help clients deal with narcissists in their life.
 
Click here to continue reading this article.
 
 
Building Relationships with Step Children
 
One of the most common reasons for not-so-good step-family relationships is lack of communication. It is important to include the children in family processes such as formulating rules and new rituals. This is a great start! The next thing to do is to encourage communication.
 
Talking is the best way to strengthen relationships, understand emotions and keep informed of what’s happening with the entire family. However, talking can sometimes have a negative effect if feelings are ignored or people are misinformed.
 
Click here to continue reading this article.
 
Other articles: www.aipc.net.au/articles
 
Intodevelopment
 
80+ Courses for less than $1/ Day
 
Hundreds of counsellors, psychologists and social workers already access over 150 hours of personal and professional development, for less than $1 a day. Now it’s your turn.
 
Mental Health Academy programs have been specially developed by psychologist and counsellor educators. These high quality educational programs can provide you with insight into how you got to this point in your life, how to heal, and how best to move forward. They cover a range of key areas that can assist you – or those you love – throughout your life journey.
 
Program areas include:
  • Conflict & Mediation
  • Relationships
  • Grief & Loss
  • Children & Adolescents
  • Communication Skills
  • Addictions
  • Bullying
  • Mental Health Disorders
  • Incident & Trauma
  • And much more.
Just released:
  • Theories of Motivation in Sport
  • Narcissism: The Basics
  • Treating Narcissism In and Around Your Clients
  • Case Studies in Narcissism
  • Principles of Psychosynthesis (coming soon)
  • Helping clients to integrate subpersonalities (coming soon)
  • Understanding Will (coming soon)
  • Working with will in the therapy room (coming soon)
 
Intoconnection
 
Have you visited the Counselling Connection Blog yet? There are over 600 interesting posts including case studies, profiles, success stories, videos and much more. Make sure you too get connected (and thank you for those who have already submitted comments and suggestions).
 
A dilemma involving an adolescent client
 
Anna is a 17 year old student in Year 12 who has come to counselling because she is not coping with the stress of her final year. Anna is from a culture where academic success is highly important and she is under intense pressure from her parents to get good grades and go to university. She does not want to disappoint them but is constantly tired and anxious.
 
The next time you see Anna, her demeanour has improved significantly. She confides in you that she found a website where she can pay someone to write her assignments for her. Since using this system she has received “A’s” and her parents are pleased. She feels this has solved her problems and says that she does not need to come to counselling anymore.
 
Click here to continue reading this post.
 
Get new posts delivered by email! Visit our FeedBurner subscription page and click the link on the subscription box.
 
 
Intotwitter
 
Follow us on Twitter and get the latest and greatest in counselling news. To follow, visit http://twitter.com/counsellingnews and click "Follow".
 
Featured Tweets
 
Scapegoating, Stereotyping, & Projecting Won’t Make Us Safe: Violence in the aftermath of trauma: http://bit.ly/UAs0VR
 
A Long-Term Approach to Studying Antisocial Behavior: http://www.psychologicalscience.org/index.php/publications/observer/obsonline
 
If you're looking for something to test the limits of your imagination, check out the book "Phi", by Giulio Tononi: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=mind-reviews-phi
 
Watch AIPC manager Amanda Black's interview with Richard Lines from Lifeline Broken Hill: http://vimeo.com/31464933
 
Congratulations to all AIPC Graduates in South Australia! Here's a photo of their recent graduation ceremony. http://pic.twitter.com/YPM9Vevj
 
TV commercials, employer interviews and video graduate stories in the AIPC channel on Vimeo: http://vimeo.com/user1002885
 
 
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Tweet Count: 3795
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Intoquotes
 
"One half of knowing what you want is knowing what you must give up before you get it."
 
~ Sidney Howard
 
Intoseminars
 
Many students of the Diploma of Counselling attend seminars to complete the practical requirements of their course. Seminars provide an ideal opportunity to network with other students and liaise with qualified counselling professionals in conjunction with completing compulsory coursework.
 
Not sure if you need to attend Seminars? Click here for information on Practical Assessments.
 
Below are upcoming seminars available during the first semester of 2013. For a full list of seminars, visit http://www.aipc.net.au/timetables.php.
 
To register for a seminar, please contact your Student Support Centre.
 
BRISBANE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 02/02, 06/04, 15/06
Communication Skills II - 09/02, 23/03, 18/05
The Counselling Process - 23-24/02, 27-28/04, 29-30/06
Counselling Therapies I - 16-17/03, 22-23/06
Counselling Therapies II - 13-14/04
Case Management - 2-3/03, 25-26/05
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 17/02, 16/06
Counselling Applications - 24/03
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 23-24/02, 27-28/04, 29-30/06
Communication Skills I - 02/02, 06/04, 15/06
Communication Skills II - 09/02, 23/03, 18/05
Counselling Therapies I - 16-17/03, 22-23/06
Counselling Therapies II - 13-14/04
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 10/03, 02/06
Family Therapy - 07/04, 07/06
Case Management - 2-3/03, 25-26/05
 
GOLD COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 25/05
Communication Skills II - 26/05
The Counselling Process - 16-17/03, 29-30/06
Counselling Therapies I - 02-03/03
Counselling Therapies II - 18-19/05
Case Management - 15-16/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 20/04
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 16-17/03, 29-30/06
Communication Skills I - 25/05
Communication Skills II - 26/05
Counselling Therapies I - 02-03/03
Counselling Therapies II - 18-19/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 06/04
Family Therapy - 08/06
Case Management - 15-16/06
 
MELBOURNE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 19/01, 09/02, 09/03, 27/04, 18/05, 29/06
Communication Skills II - 20/01, 10/02, 10/03, 28/04, 19/05, 30/06
The Counselling Process - 12-13/01, 15-16/02, 22-23/03, 20-21/04, 25-26/05, 21-22/06
Counselling Therapies I - 02-03/02, 16-17/03, 13-14/04, 04-05/05, 22-23/06
Counselling Therapies II - 09-10/02, 09-10/03, 06-07/04, 18-19/05, 08-09/06
Case Management - 23-24/02, 13-14/04, 15-16/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 27/01, 24/03, 02/06
Counselling Applications - 03/03, 12/05
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 12-13/01, 15-16/02, 22-23/03, 20-21/04, 25-26/05, 21-22/06
Communication Skills I - 19/01, 09/02, 09/03, 27/04, 18/05, 29/06
Communication Skills II - 20/01, 10/02, 10/03, 28/04, 19/05, 30/06
Counselling Therapies I - 02-03/02, 16-17/03, 13-14/04, 04-05/05, 22-23/06
Counselling Therapies II - 09-10/02, 09-10/03, 06-07/04, 18-19/05, 08-09/06
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 17/02, 11/05
Case Management - 23-24/02, 13-14/04, 15-16/06
 
NORTHERN TERRITORY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 09/02, 11/05
Communication Skills II - 02/03, 01/06
The Counselling Process - 23-24/03, 29-30-06
Counselling Therapies I - 23-24/02
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/04
Case Management - 16-17/02, 15-16/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 06/04
Counselling Applications - 02/02, 20/05
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 23-24/03, 29-30-06
Communication Skills I - 09/02, 11/05
Communication Skills II - 02/03, 01/06
Counselling Therapies I - 23-24/02
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/04
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 16/03
Family Therapy - 27/4
Counselling Applications - 02/02, 20/05
 
SOUTH AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 23/02, 13/04, 29/06
Communication Skills II - 24/02, 14/04, 30/06
The Counselling Process - 02-03/02, 06-07/04, 01-02/06
Counselling Therapies I - 02-03/03, 15-16/06
Counselling Therapies II - 02-03/02, 18-19/05
Case Management - 16-17/02, 25-26/05
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 10/02, 23/06
Counselling Applications - 16/03
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 02-03/02, 06-07/04, 01-02/06
Communication Skills I - 23/02, 13/04, 29/06
Communication Skills II - 24/02, 14/04, 30/06
Counselling Therapies I - 02-03/03, 15-16/06
Counselling Therapies II - 02-03/02, 18-19/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 23/03
Family Therapy - 17/03, 22/06
Case Management - 16-17/02, 25-26/05
 
SUNSHINE COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 16/02, 18/05
Communication Skills II - 16/03, 22/06
The Counselling Process - 18-19/01, 26-27/04
Counselling Therapies I - 22-23/03
Counselling Therapies II - 24-25/05
Case Management - 01-02/03
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 18/01
Counselling Applications - 01/02
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 18-19/01, 26-27/04
Communication Skills I - 16/02, 18/05
Communication Skills II - 16/03, 22/06
Counselling Therapies I - 22-23/03
Counselling Therapies II - 24-25/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 14/06
Family Therapy - 21/06
Case Management - 01-02/03
 
SYDNEY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 21/01, 08/02, 22/03, 19/04, 20/05, 22/06
Communication Skills II - 22/01, 14/02, 23/03, 26/04, 21/05, 29/06
The Counselling Process - 18-19/01, 06-07/02, 22-23/02, 15-16/03, 08-09/04, 29-30/04, 17-18/05, 20-21/06
Counselling Therapies I - 01-02/02, 18-19/03, 10-11/05, 19-20/06
Counselling Therapies II - 15-16/02, 11-12/04, 24-25/06
Case Management - 20-21/02, 03-04/05
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 01/03
Counselling Applications - 02/03
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 18-19/01, 06-07/02, 22-23/02, 15-16/03, 08-09/04, 29-30/04, 17-18/05, 20-21/06
Communication Skills I - 21/01, 08/02, 22/03, 19/04, 20/05, 22/06
Communication Skills II - 22/01, 14/02, 23/03, 26/04, 21/05, 29/06
Counselling Therapies I - 01-02/02, 18-19/03, 10-11/05, 19-20/06
Counselling Therapies II - 15-16/02, 11-12/04, 24-25/06
Family Therapy - 18/02, 07/05
Case Management - 20-21/02, 03-04/05
 
TASMANIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 10/02, 05/05
Communication Skills II - 03/03, 02/06
The Counselling Process - 23-24/03, 29-30/06
Counselling Therapies I - 23-24/02, 29-30/06
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/04
Case Management - 16-17/02, 15-16/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 07/04
Counselling Applications - 03/02, 19/05
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 23-24/03, 29-30/06
Communication Skills I - 10/02, 05/05
Communication Skills II - 03/03, 02/06
Counselling Therapies I - 23-24/02, 29-30/06
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/04
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 17/03
Family Therapy - 28/04  
Case Management - 16-17/02, 15-16/06
 
WESTERN AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 05/01, 09/02, 09/03, 25/05, 22/06
Communication Skills II - 06/01, 10/02, 10/03, 26/05, 23/06
The Counselling Process - 12-13/01, 16-17/02, 16-17/03, 13-14/04, 11-12/05, 15-16/06
Counselling Therapies I - 19-20/01, 06-07/04, 08-09/06
Counselling Therapies II - 23-24/02, 04-05/05
Case Management - 26-27/01, 18-19/05
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 02/02, 21/04
Counselling Applications - 23/03
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 12-13/01, 16-17/02, 16-17/03, 13-14/04, 11-12/05, 15-16/06
Communication Skills I - 05/01, 09/02, 09/03, 25/05, 22/06
Communication Skills II - 06/01, 10/02, 10/03, 26/05, 23/06
Counselling Therapies I - 19-20/01, 06-07/04, 08-09/06
Counselling Therapies II - 23-24/02, 04-05/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 03/02, 01/06
Family Therapy - 20/04
Case Management - 26-27/01, 18-19/05
 
Important Note: Advertising of the dates above does not guarantee availability of places in the seminar. Please check availability with the respective Student Support Centre.
 
 
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