In this Issue

Hello!
Intothediploma
Intomhss
Intocommunity
Intocounselling
Intobookstore
Intoarticles
Intodevelopment
Intoconnection
Intotwitter
Intoquotes
Intoseminars

Contact us

Publications

Editor: Sandra Poletto
Email: ezine@aipc.net.au
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Copyright: 2012 Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors

Hello!
 
Welcome to Edition 169 of Institute Inbrief. Nowhere is a discussion of dynamics in the changing family more pertinent than with lesbian and gay couples, and of the four functions that a family is meant to carry out for its members, the question of family formation is primary. In this edition we analyse some common challenges faced by same-sex couple families.
 
Also in this edition:
  • MHSS Workshops
  • Lert – Our Social Responsibility Program
  • Previously Published Articles
  • Blog and Twitter updates
  • Upcoming seminar dates
If you would like to access daily articles & resources, and interact with over 5300 peers, join our Facebook community today: www.facebook.com/counsellors. It is a great way to stay in touch and share your interest and knowledge in counselling.
 
Enjoy your reading,
 
 
Editor
 
 
Join our community:
 
 
Help those around you suffering mental illness in silence: www.mhss.net.au
 
Intothediploma
 
AIPC provides you with Flexible Course Delivery Modes
So YOU set the rules for how and when you learn...
 
AIPC’s accredited and nationally recognised Diploma of Counselling is designed so that you determine the manner and pace you study. You study entirely at your own pace (except of course if you’re receiving a government benefit such as Austudy) and you can start at any time, graduating in only 18-months.
 
Not only can you set the pace you study, you also determine the mode you want to study. You can study externally (at home with phone and email access to our counselling tutors); in-Class; online or any combination… all the time fully supported by our huge national team throughout our 8 Student Support Centres.
 
External learning means you can complete your entire course from the comfort of your home (or office, or overseas, or virtually anywhere). Your course comes complete with fully self-contained, referenced and professionally presented learning materials including 18 individual workbooks and readings. It really is as simple as working through the material and contacting us for support along the way. If you live locally to one of our support centres you can also attend tutorials to provide you with face to face contact if you wish (this option is ideal if you enjoy working more independently or have a busy schedule).
 
In-Class learning is a classroom forum where you learn with other students from a qualified lecturer. Classes are available in most main cities, at flexible times. In-Class is a great way for you to accelerate your learning, interact with other students and stay highly motivated. (This option is particularly suitable if you enjoy learning in the classroom environment with other students).
 
Online learning allows you to complete your learning entirely via your PC. You still receive all the high quality hardcopy resources (so you don’t miss out on anything!), but you’ll access all your learning materials and complete assessments online.
 
Any Combination. Of course you don’t have to stick with one learning method throughout your studies. You’re welcome to use whichever method suits your needs and desires at the time. You may choose to complete one workbook in-Class, another online, then externally. Whatever is most convenient!
 
Learn more - visit www.aipc.net.au/lz today!
 
Watch inspirational stories from some of our Graduates: www.aipc.net.au/gradvideo
 
Hear what Employers say about our Graduates: www.aipc.net.au/employervids
 
Intomhss
 
Australia Is Suffering A Mental Health Crisis
 
Our suicide rate is now TWICE our road toll. Many suicides could possibly be averted, if only the people close to the victim were able to identify the early signs and appropriately intervene.
 
RIGHT NOW someone you care about – a family member, friend, or colleague – may be suffering in silence, and you don’t know.
 
With the right training, you can help that family member, friend or colleague.
 
Save $100 when you book your seat in an upcoming MHSS Workshop:
Other dates and locations: www.mhss.net.au/find-a-course
 
Your registration includes the 2-day facilitated workshop; a hardcopy of the MHSS Student Workbook; and access to an online dashboard where you can obtain your certificate, watch role-play videos, and much more.
 
MHSS Specialties
 
Once you complete the MHSS Core program you can undertake the MHSS Specialty Programs:
 
 
Book your seat at the next MHSS Workshop now and save $100.
 
If you have any queries, please contact Pedro Gondim on pedro@mhss.net.au.
 
PS Members of the ACA can accrue 28 OPD points by attending the MHSS Workshop.
 
Intocommunity
 
“Be Alert... The World Needs More Lerts”
 
Lert is a national organisation of members – everyday folk – that are collectively interested in supporting our communities understand and overcome the issues of mental health.
 
Lerts are not necessarily mental health professionals. Anyone can be a Lert. Lerts are ordinary folk with an extraordinary vision of dramatically reducing the onset of mental illness through early intervention, education and community engagement.
 
Lerts share a willingness to help their communities and workplaces address the systemic problem of mental illness. They’re involved in educating their communities and workplaces about mental illness, breaking down stigma’s, implementing early intervention models, promoting support structures and much more.
 
Lerts:
  • Are sensitive to the mental health wellbeing of their family, friends and community.
  • Provide a social support through provision of education and awareness.
  • Can deliver mental health related training.
  • Can act as Lert Officers in their workplace.
  • Can be trained in Mental Health Social Support to act as a conduit of support and referral.
  • Can join and operate local Chapters to influence mental health services and education in their community.
  • Engage with local ‘centres of influence’ such as workplaces, community centres, schools, Medicare Locals, GP’s and primary health centres, and more.
  • Network with health professionals and support structures.
  • Undertake awareness programs.
  • Plus much more.
Learn more and join Lert today: www.lert.com.au/lz 
 
Like Lert Facebook here: www.facebook.com/RUaLert
Follow Lert Twitter here: www.twitter.com/RUaLert
 
Intocounselling
 
Challenges of Same-Sex Couple Families
 
Nowhere is a discussion of dynamics in the changing family more pertinent than with lesbian and gay couples, and of the four functions that a family is meant to carry out for its members, the question of family formation is primary. Although gays and lesbians are not permitted to marry in most locations around the world, they do come together in civil unions, and many post-divorce families consist of a gay or lesbian couple with the children of one or both of them from a previous heterosexual marriage.
 
All of the problems inherent in step families are relevant, but in addition, same-sex couples bear the burdens of secrecy and isolation in an attempt to avoid rejection from their families of origin and stigmatisation by the wider (heterosexual) society. In terms of creating a sense of family membership, gays and lesbians are also confronted with the lack of legal sanction for their committed relationships, and challenges with parental rights (Oswald, 2002).
 
Dealing with prejudice due to unconscious traditional assumptions
 
Martin (1998) summarises the situation for same-sex couple families by commenting that the issues that arise for gays and lesbians in parenting are a function of two things: the rich variety of constellations same-sex families comprise, and the fact that the society they are living in does not value rich variety! The presumptions supporting “traditional” family make-up (and at the same time condemning gay/lesbian family compositions) are strong, and often unconscious. Some of these are:
  • That there should be two parents
  • That the two parents should be one of each gender
  • That they will be romantic partners of one another
  • That they will live under one roof
  • That they will both be biologically related to the children they raise
  • That they will be recognised legally as a family.
Perhaps because this model of “family” cannot apply to any same-sex couple family, there has been strong opposition to gays and lesbians forming families with the same legal, medical, and other rights as heterosexual, “Mum and Dad” nuclear families. Critics have claimed that same-sex couple family constellations harm the children, although many studies have asserted that children brought up by lesbians and gays are “indistinguishable” from children raised by heterosexuals (Patterson, 1992). To counteract these scientifically unsupported assertions against same-sex marriages, several prominent bodies have come out in recent years with statements such as the one by the American Academy of Pediatrics (2006):
 
“More than 25 years of research have documented that there is no relationship between parents’ sexual orientation and any measure of a child’s emotional, psychosocial, and behavioral adjustment. These data have demonstrated no risk to children as a result of growing up in a family with 1 [sic] or more gay parents. Conscientious and nurturing adults, whether they are men or women, heterosexual or homosexual, can be excellent parents. The rights, benefits, and protections of civil marriage can further strengthen these families.” (Pawelski, Perrin, Foy, et al., July 2006)
 
Similarly, in Australia, the Australian Psychological Society declared:
 
“The family studies literature indicates that it is family processes (such as the quality of parenting and relationships within the family) that contribute to determining children’s wellbeing and ‘outcomes’, rather than family structures, per se, such as the number, gender, sexuality and co-habitation status of parents. The research indicates that parenting practices and children’s outcomes in families parented by lesbian and gay parents are likely to be at least as favourable as those in families of heterosexual parents, despite the reality that considerable legal discrimination and inequity remain significant challenges for these families.” (Short, Riggs, Perlesz, Brown, & Kane, 2007)
 
Family membership looks different in same-sex couple families
 
Some of the family formation issues can be found in the following examples:
 
A seven-year-old boy has three parents in two households. In one household resides his gay biological father, and in the other are his two lesbian moms, neither of whom is biologically related to him. The mothers share half-time custody with the father, including involvement in school activities, but have no legal rights to the child, should anything happen to the father. The boy’s father has a partner, but he is not a designated parent in this family system. The biological mother is not around.
 
In a different family, a gay man’s sister agreed to become pregnant as a surrogate mother. She was inseminated with the sperm of his partner, gave birth to a little girl, and gave the baby to the two men, who are considered the child’s only parents. The girl’s biological mother is an aunt, both biologically and functionally. Her husband is an uncle, and her three children are the girl’s cousins, both biologically and functionally. They are not considered “siblings” at all. (Martin, 1998)
 
Martin (1998) claims that children in these relationships are not confused when adults speak to them openly and honestly about whom their biological parents are (those who made them) and whom their caregiving parents are (those who are bringing them up). At an institutional level, however, these children have the challenge to know how to fill in endless forms asking for “Name of Mother” and “Name of Father”. Who does the seven-year-old boy above put for “Mother”, and does he add in an extra line for “Other mother”? Does the girl above write in her biological father’s name, and then cross out “Name of Mother”, writing “Other father” instead?
 
Even if total disclosure is desired, there is the problem of appropriate language. What, for example, does a mother of a lesbian call her daughter’s primary relationship: girlfriend? Lover? Life-partner? If the lesbian women have a child through artificial insemination, what is the name for the non-birth mother? And what is the name for the relationship between such a child and the non-birth-mother’s mother? (Slater, 1995, in Johnson & Colucci, 2005)
 
Being totally open and disclosing affords the opportunity for the families to receive all the support and community services available in their towns. Being open puts the children in the strongest position to deal with some of the social situations arising from having gay or lesbian parents. They can become children more capable of authenticity and intimacy, people who demand respectful treatment for themselves and have some trust in their ability to cope with others who are intolerant. And school and medical personnel are in the best possible position to evaluate the children’s experience in terms of decisions needing to be made (Martin, 1998).
 
Stress and danger for same-sex family disclosers
 
Unfortunately, the above non-traditional families, upon disclosing their status, also open themselves to taunts and ridicule from homophobic others, potential loss of support from extended family, and even loss of jobs or housing. Some may experience violence upon disclosure. Sadly, lesbian and gay couples are also advised not to disclose the true status of their relationship until custody is ironclad (meaning: for whichever parent gets to be the “legal” one), for there is the real danger of losing the child altogether.
 
Even if a family lives in a relatively tolerant, liberal society where these dangers do not necessarily lurk, just the thought that they could arise generates considerable anxiety for the same sex couple and their family. The anxiety may be unbearable for a same-sex parent which does not have legal recognition as a parent, because the child could be taken from them in a heartbeat if the parent with legal recognition dies. Too, grandparents may be unwilling to invest time in a grandchild that they are afraid will be taken away. Employers may not offer family leave or recognise family emergencies that an employee must take off for. Insurance companies may not cover the child of a non-legal parent, yet in most communities, a child is not legally permitted to have two same-sex parents.
 
Apart from those stressors in the outer environment, there is the ever-present danger that the same-sex couple will separate. In this case, the non-legal parent may lose total access to the child, as the biological parent resorts to legal privilege. (Martin, 1998)
 
Looking at the typical life-cycle of a human being, we can see that lesbian and gay people are challenged to go through all the same family life-cycle phases as heterosexuals. Yet from the stage of adolescence -- a fraught time of confusion and destabilisation for teenagers in the best of times --gay or lesbian adolescents with heterosexual parents must do the same individuation (separation from parents) tasks as heterosexual teens, but often without support from the family. They must plan for an adulthood that will be different than anything that their parents are able to help them prepare for.
 
If such teens do out themselves, families frequently become alienated, disoriented and full of self-blame and guilt. Many families threaten the teen with expulsion and violence. The support that such an adolescent might have had from community organisations for gay and lesbian people is often blocked, as parents fear that association with such groups will expose the teen to exploitation and HIV (Johnson & Colucci, 2005).
 
In young adulthood, a gay or lesbian faces all the normal developmental life tasks, but must continue to handle the ins and outs of developing gay/lesbian identity, along with the stresses of living in a stigmatising broader culture. Some people delay disclosing their gay/ lesbian orientation for years, being known to the outside world as merely a “single” person. While society often disadvantages a single person, seeing them as “eternal young adults”, the further disadvantage is that a gay or lesbian person’s family may also continue to be in denial about their child’s homosexuality.
 
When such a person begins to couple, the family of origin can no longer be in denial about the gay or lesbian orientation, and the full brunt of family reactivity, leading to cut-off or dis-allowing of the same-sex partner into the family’s home, may result. It is necessary to do the disclosing, however, if one would develop differentiated relationships with family members. Gay or lesbian adults need social support as much as their heterosexual counterparts: perhaps more so, given the homophobic environment in which so many live.
 
The family functions of “family formation and membership” and “nurturance, education and socialisation” tended to with intentionality and redefinition
 
With family of origin either cut off or too alienated to be supportive, gay and lesbian couples have adopted some strategies for carrying out Function One (family membership and belonging), and also Function Three (education and socialisation). Family systems experts name these resilience-promoting efforts as intentionality and redefinition.
 
Intentionality occurs when gays and lesbians consciously act to validate themselves as family members, creating a sense of family in a hostile environment. Intentionality is happening when same-sex couples “choose” their kin -- perceiving friends as members of the family, when they become parents either by natural means or by adoption, and when they integrate heterosexuals, including biological family members, into their lives.
 
Through these means the same-sex couple creates what is called a “family of choice”. Through intentionality, such couples also carefully manage disclosure and develop networks and communities which support them both materially and socially. Gays and lesbians may also solidify their identity and strengthen their relationships by creating rituals, and by ingeniously working out ways to achieve legalisation (Oswald, 2002).
 
Redefinition involves the ongoing development of belief systems which affirm gays and lesbians. A chief aspect of redefinition is politicisation, in which same-sex couples become activists, attempting to educate not only their children but also the wider community in the management of stigma. One way in which gays and lesbians do this is through naming, the process of creating labels for parents and other non-kin family members. They also may choose a common surname.
 
Also, same-sex couple families are helped by integrating their homosexuality with other aspects of themselves that are shared by all, such as ethnicity or religion. Last but not least, gays and lesbians can re-define the concept of family itself, refusing to see it as a bio-legal set of relationships which punish all those who flout the norms. Rather, “family” for same-sex-couple families can come to mean an entity whose ongoing construction is not only tolerant of human differences, but which positively affirms it (Oswald, 2002). Although coming into a same-sex couple family can be a challenging transition, the experience does not put safety at risk in any way like the experience of family violence.
 
This article is an extract of the Mental Health Social Support Specialty “Supporting Challenged Families”. For more information on MHSS, visit www.mhss.net.au.
 
References:
 
Johnson, T.W., & Colucci, P. (2005). Lesbians, gay men, and the family life cycle. In Carter, B., and McGoldrick, M., Eds. (2005). The expanded family life cycle: Individual, family, and social perspectives (third edition). Boston, Massachusetts: Allyn and Bacon.
 
Martin, A. (1998). Issues for Lesbian- and gay-parented families. Parenthood in America. Retrieved on 5 July, 2012, from: http://parenthood.library.wisc.edu/Martin/Martin.html
 
Oswald, R.F. (2002). Resilience within the family networks of lesbians and gay men: Intentionality and redefinition. Journal of marriage and family, 64, 374-383.
 
Patterson, C. (October, 1992). “Children of Lesbian and Gay Parents.” In Child Development, October, 1992, 63 (5), pp 1025 – 1042).
 
Pawelski, J.G., Perrin E. C., Foy, J.M., et al. (July 2006). “The effects of marriage, civil union, and domestic partnership laws on the health and well-being of children”. Pediatrics 118 (1): 349–64. DOI:10.1542/peds.2006-1279. PMID 16818585. Retrieved on 5 July, 2012, from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Same-sex_marriage_and_the_family
 
Short, E., Riggs, D.W., Perlesz, A., Brown, R., & Kane, G. (2007). Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) Parented Families – A Literature Review prepared for The Australian Psychological Society” (PDF). http://www.psychology.org.au/Assets/Files/LGBT-Families-Lit-Review.pdf. Retrieved on 5 July, 2012, from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Same-sex_marriage_and_the_family
 
 
Join our community:
 
 
Intobookstore
 
The Institute has a list of recommended textbooks and DVDs that can add great value to your learning journey - and the good news is that you can purchase them very easily. The AIPC bookstore will give you:
  • Discounted prices.
  • Easy ordering method.
  • Quality guarantee.
This fortnight's feature is...
 
Name: Stress: Myth, Theory and Research
Authors: Jones, F. & Bright, M.
AIPC Code: JONES
AIPC Price: $44.95 (RRP $49.95)
ISBN: 978-013-041-1891
 
This book attempts a clear overview of our current understanding of stress. It highlights some of the popular misconceptions about stress, providing a valuable resource in terms of suggestions for further reading and the guidance it provides through a developing and complex field.
 
To order this book, contact your Student Support Centre or the AIPC Head Office (1800 657 667).
 
Intoarticles
 
Trends and Statistics of the Contemporary Family
 
If the family is society’s “fundamental unit”, what are some of the emergent trends and statistical truths about the unit in these times of accelerated change? If one of our goals, as counsellors, is to assist families in the crisis of transition, we must understand the changes and concomitant stressors that accompany the new forms. In this article, we look at some trends and statistics of the “contemporary family”.
 
Click here to continue reading this article.
 
 
Problem Gambling: Signs, Myths and Facts
 
Also called “ludomania” or “compulsive gambling”, problem gambling occurs when someone has an urge to continuously gamble despite harmful negative consequences or a desire to stop. It is not the gambler’s behaviour which defines whether problem gambling is occurring. Rather, it is whether the gambler or others experience harm from the gambling behaviour. At the severe end, it may be referred to as clinical “pathological gambling” if the gambler’s behaviour meets certain criteria (Wikipedia, 2012).
 
Click here to continue reading this article.
 
Other articles: www.aipc.net.au/articles
 
Intodevelopment
 
74 Courses for less than $1/ Day
 
Hundreds of counsellors, psychologists and social workers already access over 150 hours of personal and professional development, for less than $1 a day. Now it’s your turn.
 
Mental Health Academy programs have been specially developed by psychologist and counsellor educators. These high quality educational programs can provide you with insight into how you got to this point in your life, how to heal, and how best to move forward. They cover a range of key areas that can assist you – or those you love – throughout your life journey.
 
Program areas include:
  • Conflict & Mediation
  • Relationships
  • Grief & Loss
  • Children & Adolescents
  • Communication Skills
  • Addictions
  • Bullying
  • Mental Health Disorders
  • Incident & Trauma
  • And much more.
New courses (being released between Oct & Dec):
  • Theories of Motivation in Sport
  • Narcissism: The Basics
  • Treating Narcissism In and Around Your Clients
  • Case Studies in Narcissism
  • Principles of Psychosynthesis
  • Helping clients to integrate subpersonalities
  • Understanding Will
  • Working with will in the therapy room
Begin your journey today. Click on the link below to register your unlimited membership and access all MHA courses for less than $1 per day. Don’t miss out:
 
 
Intoconnection
 
Have you visited theCounselling Connection Blog yet? There are over 600 interesting posts including case studies, profiles, success stories, videos and much more. Make sure you too get connected (and thank you for those who have already submitted comments and suggestions).
 
What’s happening at the Institute...
 
We’re expanding our residential schools offering to Melbourne and Sydney. This will make the attending residential schools easier for NSW, VIC and SA residents.
 
Melbourne residential schools will kick-off from Semester 3, 2012; whilst Sydney residential schools will begin from Semester 1, 2013. The residential schools in Melbourne and Sydney will be applicable to the Bachelor of Counselling and core subjects of the Bachelor of Psychological Science.
 
Click here to continue reading this post.
 
Get new posts delivered by email! Visit our FeedBurner subscription page and click the link on the subscription box.
 
 
Intotwitter
 
Follow us on Twitter and get the latest and greatest in counselling news. To follow, visit http://twitter.com/counsellingnews and click "Follow".
 
Featured Tweets
 
 
 
AIPC Article Library » Skills and Role of the Group Therapist: http://www.aipc.net.au/articles/?p=272  
 
Like meditation? Try this: http://smilingmind.com.au/
 
New research finds that children with ADHD are concerned that doctors do not understand the condition: http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2012/oct/15/adhd-study-reveals-childrens-views
 
Old Adage 'Sleep On It' Is True -- But Only If It's a Really Difficult Problem, Study Shows: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121012074741.htm
 
Note that you need a Twitter profile to follow a list. If you do not have one yet, visit http://twitter.com to create a free profile today!
 
Tweet Count: 3700
Follower Count: 5102
 
Intoquotes
 
"A happy family is but an earlier heaven."
 
~ George Bernard Shaw
 
Intoseminars
 
Many students of the Diploma of Counselling attend seminars to complete the practical requirements of their course. Seminars provide an ideal opportunity to network with other students and liaise with qualified counselling professionals in conjunction with completing compulsory coursework.
 
Not sure if you need to attend Seminars? Click here for information on Practical Assessments.
 
Below are the remainder seminars dates and locations for 2012. You can also access this information and seminar pre-requisites via our website: www.aipc.net.au/timetables.php.
 
To register for a seminar, please contact your Student Support Centre.
 
BRISBANE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 20/10, 01/12
Communication Skills II - 03/11
The Counselling Process - 24/11
Counselling Therapies I - 08-09/12
Counselling Therapies II - 27-28/10
Case Management - 10-11/11
Counselling Applications - 16/12
 
CDA Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 20/10, 01/12
Communication Skills II - 03/11
The Counselling Process - 24/11
Counselling Therapies I - 8-9/12
Counselling Therapies II - 27-28/10
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 17/11
Family Therapy - 15/12
Case Management - 10-11/11
 
GOLD COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 17/11
Communication Skills II - 15/12
The Counselling Process - 27/10, 01/12
Counselling Therapies II - 23-24/11
Case Management - 19-20/10
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 27/10, 01/12
Communication Skills I - 17/11
Communication Skills II - 15/12
Counselling Therapies II - 23-24/11
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 26/10
Case Management - 19-20/10
 
MELBOURNE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 03/11, 01/12
Communication Skills II - 04/11, 02/12
The Counselling Process - 27/10, 23/11, 14/12
Counselling Therapies I - 10-11/11, 8-9/12
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/10, 17-18/11, 15-16/12
Case Management - 27-28/10, 24-25/11
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 27/10, 23/11, 14/12
Communication Skills I - 03/11, 01/12
Communication Skills II - 04/11, 02/12
Counselling Therapies I - 10-11/11, 8-9/12
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/10, 17-18/11, 15-16/12
Case Management - 27-28/10, 24-25/11
 
NORTHERN TERRITORY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 01/12
Communication Skills II - 08/12
The Counselling Process - 10/11
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/11
Counselling Therapies II - 15-16/12
Case Management - 24-25/11
Counselling Applications - 27/10
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 10/11
Communication Skills I - 01/12
Communication Skills II - 08/12
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/11
Counselling Therapies II - 15-16/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 03/11
Case Management - 24-25/11
 
SOUTH AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 10/11
Communication Skills II - 11/11
The Counselling Process - 09/12
Counselling Therapies I - 24-25/11
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 09/12
Communication Skills I - 10/11
Communication Skills II - 11/11
Counselling Therapies I - 24-25/11
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 08/12
 
SUNSHINE COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 10/11
Communication Skills II - 11/11
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/10
Counselling Applications - 03/11
 
CDA Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 10/11
Communication Skills II - 11/11
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/10
 
SYDNEY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 15/11
Communication Skills II - 20/10, 30/11
The Counselling Process - 03/11, 26/11, 13/12
Counselling Therapies I - 23-24/11
Counselling Therapies II - 14-15/12
Case Management - 26-27/10, 06-07/12
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 17/12
Counselling Applications - 18/12
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 03/11, 26/11, 13/12
Communication Skills I - 15/11
Communication Skills II - 20/10, 30/11
Counselling Therapies I - 23-24/11
Counselling Therapies II - 14-15/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 19/11
Family Therapy - 20/11
Case Management - 26-27/10, 06-07/12
 
TASMANIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 16/12
Communication Skills II - 04/11
The Counselling Process - 25/11
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/11
Counselling Therapies II - 01-02/12
Case Management - 10-11/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 21/10
Counselling Applications - 28/10
 
CDA Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 16/12
Communication Skills II - 04/11
The Counselling Process - 25/11
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/11
Counselling Therapies II - 01-02/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 09/12
Case Management - 10-11/11
 
WESTERN AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 27/10, 08/12
Communication Skills II - 28/10, 09/12
The Counselling Process - 03/11, 01/12
Counselling Therapies I - 24-25/11
Counselling Therapies II - 15-16/12
Case Management - 10-11/11
Counselling Applications - 04/11
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 03/11, 01/12
Communication Skills I - 27/10, 08/12
Communication Skills II - 28/10, 09/12
Counselling Therapies I - 24-25/11
Counselling Therapies II - 15-16/12
Case Management - 10-11/11
 
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