In this Issue

Hello!
Intothediploma
Intomhss
Intocommunity
Intocounselling
Intobookstore
Intoarticles
Intodevelopment
Intoconnection
Intotwitter
Intoquotes
Intoseminars

Contact us

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Editor: Sandra Poletto
Email: ezine@aipc.net.au
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Copyright: 2012 Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors

Hello!
Welcome to Edition 168 of Institute Inbrief. The meaning of the word “depression” varies widely. Some people may say they are depressed when they have a bad day, but the mood passes by the next day; this situation would not be classed as depression in a clinical sense. For others, though, feeling unhappy, “down”, or “low” may persist for weeks, months, or even years, and other symptoms may develop along with it.
 
In this edition’s featured article, we’ll review core and associated features of depression, and distinguish between several different types of depression (or depressive disorders).
 
Also in this edition:
  • MHSS Workshops
  • Lert – Our Social Responsibility Program
  • Previously Published Articles
  • Blog and Twitter updates
  • Upcoming seminar dates
If you would like to access daily articles & resources, and interact with over 5200 peers, join our Facebook community today: www.facebook.com/counsellors. It is a great way to stay in touch and share your interest and knowledge in counselling.
 
Enjoy your reading,
 
 
Editor
 
 
Join our community:
 
 
Help those around you suffering mental illness in silence: www.mhss.net.au
 
Intothediploma
 
AIPC Is Determined To Make Counselling An Attainable Career For You,
Just Like Over 55,000 Other Students In The Past 20 Years!
 
We have helped over 55,000 people from 27 countries pursue their dream of assisting others with a recognised Counselling qualification.
 
It's been a wonderful journey over the last 20 years (the Institute was first established in 1990). And it's been a pleasure to assist so many people realise their counselling aspirations in that time.
 
Why are so many people delighted with their studies? Our research over the years highlights three keys points...
  1. Our courses and personnel have just ONE specific focus... Excellence in Counselling Education. We live and breathe counselling education. Nothing else gets in the way.
  2. Exceptional value in your education investment. Our courses are always much more affordable than other providers that deliver counselling education. Our unique focus on counselling education, the large number of students undertaking our programs, and the creative way we deliver our courses provide us with cost savings that we pass on to you.
  3. The flexibility to study where, when and how you want to. You can study Externally, In-Class, On-Line or any combination. And you can undertake your studies at a pace that suits you... 12 to 18 months or over 2, 3 even 4 years or more. You decide because you are in charge.
We understand that no two people have the same circumstances. You no doubt have issues affecting your life that are unique to you and affect the speed and manner you'd like to study. You may be working full or part-time, undertaking other studies, or may not have studied for a long time.
 
Let's face it, life is not predictable and in today's fast paced society it's important that your education is flexible enough to fit in with your other obligations. AIPC provides you with flexible course delivery modes so YOU set the rules for how and when you learn.
 
Want to find out more? Visit www.aipc.net.au/lz today!
 
Watch inspirational stories from some of our Graduates:www.aipc.net.au/gradvideo
 
Hear what Employers say about our Graduates: www.aipc.net.au/employervids
 
Intomhss
 
Australia Is Suffering A Mental Health Crisis
 
Our suicide rate is now TWICE our road toll. Many suicides could possibly be averted, if only the people close to the victim were able to identify the early signs and appropriately intervene.
 
RIGHT NOW someone you care about – a family member, friend, or colleague – may be suffering in silence, and you don’t know.
 
With the right training, you can help that family member, friend or colleague.
 
Save $100 when you book your seat in an upcoming MHSS Workshop:
Other dates and locations: www.mhss.net.au/find-a-course
 
Your registration includes the 2-day facilitated workshop; a hardcopy of the MHSS Student Workbook; and access to an online dashboard where you can obtain your certificate, watch role-play videos, and much more.
 
MHSS Specialties
 
Once you complete the MHSS Core program you can undertake the MHSS Specialty Programs:
Book your seat at the next MHSS Workshop now and save $100.
 
If you have any queries, please contact Pedro Gondim on pedro@mhss.net.au.
 
PS Members of the ACA can accrue 28 OPD points by attending the MHSS Workshop.
 
Intocommunity
 
“Be Alert... The World Needs More Lerts”
 
Lert is a national organisation of members – everyday folk – that are collectively interested in supporting our communities understand and overcome the issues of mental health.
 
Lerts are not necessarily mental health professionals. Anyone can be a Lert. Lerts are ordinary folk with an extraordinary vision of dramatically reducing the onset of mental illness through early intervention, education and community engagement.
 
Lerts share a willingness to help their communities and workplaces address the systemic problem of mental illness. They’re involved in educating their communities and workplaces about mental illness, breaking down stigma’s, implementing early intervention models, promoting support structures and much more.
 
Lerts:
  • Are sensitive to the mental health wellbeing of their family, friends and community.
  • Provide a social support through provision of education and awareness.
  • Can deliver mental health related training.
  • Can act as Lert Officers in their workplace.
  • Can be trained in Mental Health Social Support to act as a conduit of support and referral.
  • Can join and operate local Chapters to influence mental health services and education in their community.
  • Engage with local ‘centres of influence’ such as workplaces, community centres, schools, Medicare Locals, GP’s and primary health centres, and more.
  • Network with health professionals and support structures.
  • Undertake awareness programs.
  • Plus much more.
Learn more and join Lert today: www.lert.com.au/lz 
 
Like Lert Facebook here: www.facebook.com/RUaLert
Follow Lert Twitter here: www.twitter.com/RUaLert
 
Intocounselling
 
Depression and Depressive Disorders
 
The meaning of the word “depression” varies widely. Some people may say they are depressed when they have a bad day, but the mood passes by the next day; this situation would not be classed as depression in a clinical sense. For others, though, feeling unhappy, “down”, or “low” may persist for weeks, months, or even years, and other symptoms may develop along with it.
 
The low mood associated with depression can range from a mild form, where people still lead a normal life (although the depression makes that harder and less enjoyable) to a severe form, which can be life-threatening, because people are at risk of suicide. At the very least, severe depression has a major and sometimes lasting impact on the person’s life, work, and relationships.
 
Because there is sometimes a sense of failure or serious mental illness associated with the term “depression”, people will often not admit to feeling depressed. Rather, they may acknowledge feeling unhappy, sad, or low. They may talk about not having interest in things anymore, or feeling tired most of the time.
 
To decide if someone is “clinically depressed,” a doctor or mental health professional will focus on the symptoms the person is feeling. In order to be classified as “depression”, and in order to distinguish the low mood from other mood problems and from normal, everyday experiences and problems, the clinician will ask the person about core features (which are essential for a diagnosis of depression) and associated features: additional symptoms, some of which the person will need to have in order to meet the criteria for depression.
 
Core and associated features
 
Core features include a lowered mood and a lack of interest or pleasure in usual activities. Either one or both of these must be present for a person to be diagnosed as depressed.
 
As well as the two core features, there are additional symptoms which constitute a clinical finding of depression. These are either physical, psychological, or social features:
 
Physical features:
  • Disturbed sleeping: waking in the night or earlier than usual, or sleeping too much
  • Loss of appetite or overeating; changes in weight
  • Tiredness or ongoing lack of energy
  • Aches and pains which are not explained by medical diagnoses of problems
  • Loss of libido
  • Either markedly slowed movement, or increased agitation and restlessness
Psychological features:
  • Feeling unhappy or sad or having a low mood
  • Experiencing a loss of confidence or self-esteem
  • Feeling guilty or self-blaming
  • Being unable to enjoy things like before
  • Feeling that things won’t improve in the future
  • Pessimism or sense of hopelessness
  • Thoughts of self-harm or suicide
Social function features:
  • Poor concentration and/or memory
  • Difficulties managing work, family responsibilities or other usual activities
  • Irritability or more frequent arguments with people in the person’s life
  • Not wanting to see people or do things
  • Frequent visits to the doctor (Haddad, M., Buszewicz, M., & Murphy, B., 2010).
Depression, also called a “major depressive episode”, is classified as mild, moderate, or severe, or as “dysthymia”, according to the following:
 
Mild depression: At least two core symptoms and at least two additional symptoms; the person has some difficulty with ordinary activities, but can still do them.
 
Dysthymia: Mild depression for more than two years.
 
Moderate depression: At least two core symptoms and at least three or four additional symptoms; the person has a fair amount of difficulty carrying on with normal work and social activity.
 
Severe depression: Two core symptoms, and at least four or five additional symptoms, some of which are severe. The person shows considerable distress and agitation (or else slowing), and is unlikely to be able to continue with their normal activities (Haddad et al, 2010).
 
The different types of depressive disorders
 
Mental health professionals distinguish between several different types of depression. The main ones are:
 
Major depressive disorder: As described above, an episode of depression may be referred to as “major depression”, “clinical depression”, “unipolar depression”, or just “depression”. The person would experience the symptoms from the core and associated features lists (above) most days for at least two weeks, and they would generally interfere with his or her social relationships and work. Dysthymia is included in this category of major depressive disorder.
 
Bipolar disorder: Formerly known as “manic depression”, bipolar disorder is characterised by periods of depression alternating with periods of mania, during which the person seems to have limitless energy, need very little sleep, talk fast, have difficulty focusing, and do unwise things such as give away the family silver or rack up huge debt on credit cards. The person may have normal moods in between the mania and the depression.
 
Psychotic depression: This depression occurs when people lose contact with reality. People may believe that they are being persecuted or punished.
 
Post-partum (postnatal depression): After women have given birth, the hormonal and physical changes in their bodies plus the new responsibilities of caring for the baby put them at higher risk for depression. While the symptoms of “baby blues” are the same as those for “regular” depression, the stakes are higher in that being depressed may significantly interfere with mothering, and with mother-child bonding.
 
Seasonal affective disorder (SAD): There is a higher incidence of this depression in late autumn and winter, and also in extreme northern countries, such as those of Scandinavia, where there is very little light during the months of winter. Caused by a lack of sunlight, people with this form of depression lack energy, sleep too much, crave carbohydrates, and generally are at risk of weight gain.
 
Melancholia: In this type of depressed mood, a person may awaken early, lose weight, become very slow in movements, and feel guilty. It feels different from normal sadness, and is a more biological form of depression (Jorm, A., Allen, N., Morgan, A., & Purcell, R., 2009; Haddad et al, 2010).
 
Often people diagnosed as depressed will be suffering from an anxiety disorder as well.
 
This article is an extract of the Mental Health Social Support Specialty “Supporting Those With Depression Or Anxiety”. For more information on MHSS, visit www.mhss.net.au.
 
References:
 
Haddad, M., Buszewicz, M., & Murphy, B. (2010). Supporting people with depression and anxiety: A guide for practice nurses. University College London, MRC General Practice Research Framework.
 
Jorm, A.F., Allen, N.B., Morgan, A.J., Purcell, R. (2009). A guide to what works for depression. beyondblue: Melbourne.
 
Join our community:
 
 
Intobookstore
 
The Institute has a list of recommended textbooks and DVDs that can add great value to your learning journey - and the good news is that you can purchase them very easily. The AIPC bookstore will give you:
  • Discounted prices.
  • Easy ordering method.
  • Quality guarantee.
This fortnight's feature is...
 
Name: Theories and Strategies in Counselling and Psychotherapy, 5th edition
Authors: Gilliland
AIPC Code: GILLILAND
AIPC Price: $131.35 (RRP $145.95)
ISBN: 978-020-534-3973
 
This is text that operates in “real time”. It puts the student directly into psychotherapy as it is being practised today through the latest theoretical research and delivery systems.
 
To order this book, contact your Student Support Centreor the AIPC Head Office (1800 657 667).
 
Intoarticles
 
Psychological Interventions for Depression
 
Treatments (or interventions) for depression fall into one of three categories, and often several are recommended to be taken up at once. These main groupings are: medical interventions; psychological interventions and; lifestyle interventions
 
Beyondblue, the Australian organisation set up to tackle depression in Australia, has an excellent resource, A guide to what works for depression (Jorm et al, 2009), which outlines the various interventions and rates them according to how effective they are.
 
Click here to continue reading this article.
 
 
Reacting to Your Child Being Bullied
 
If you believe that your child is a victim of bullying, you are most probably experiencing two reactions. Firstly, outrage, coupled with other emotions such as confusion and guilt. Secondly, this may raise memories of your own experiences with bullying – either as being bullied, as the bully or as a bystander.
 
It is absolutely natural if you are experiencing these memories and feelings. However, it is better to acknowledge them and use them to your benefit, rather than letting your feelings filter through onto your child and their need for support. If your reaction is to seek justice for your child, you are not alone.
 
Click here to continue reading this article.
 
Other articles: www.aipc.net.au/articles
 
Intodevelopment
 
71 Courses for less than $1/ Day
 
Hundreds of counsellors, psychologists and social workers already access over 100 hours of personal and professional development, for less than $1 a day. Now it’s your turn.
 
Mental Health Academy programs have been specially developed by psychologist and counsellor educators. These high quality educational programs can provide you with insight into how you got to this point in your life, how to heal, and how best to move forward. They cover a range of key areas that can assist you – or those you love – throughout your life journey.
 
Program areas include:
  • Conflict & Mediation
  • Relationships
  • Grief & Loss
  • Children & Adolescents
  • Communication Skills
  • Addictions
  • Bullying
  • Incident & Trauma
  • And much more.
Begin your journey today. Click on the link below to register for a monthly or annual unlimited membership. As an unlimited member, you can access all MHA courses for less than $1 per day, and receive substantial discounts when purchasing any video workshop:
 
 
Intoconnection
 
Have you visited theCounselling Connection Blog yet? There are over 600 interesting posts including case studies, profiles, success stories, videos and much more. Make sure you too get connected (and thank you for those who have already submitted comments and suggestions).
 
Preparing for the final chapter
 
The adage is famously familiar: Nothing is certain in life except death and taxes.
 
Few counselors moonlight as accountants, and surprisingly few counselors address the subject of dying with clients, even though Thomas Nickel says they are well suited to do so. Nickel, the executive director for continuing education at Alliant International University (AIU), isn’t talking about helping clients who are grieving the loss of a loved one. He is referring to helping clients come to terms with their own mortality — a topic Nickel contends largely gets pushed to the background in our society.
 
Click here to continue reading this post.
 
Get new posts delivered by email! Visit our FeedBurner subscription page and click the link on the subscription box.
 
 
Intotwitter
 
Follow us on Twitter and get the latest and greatest in counselling news. To follow, visit http://twitter.com/counsellingnews and click "Follow".
 
Featured Tweets
 
Mental health and well-being in resident mine workers: Out of the fly-in fly-out box: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1440-1584.2012.01267.x/full
 
Mental health and well-being within rural communities: The Australian Rural Mental Health Study: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1440-1584.2009.01118.x/full
 
 
An insight into jetlags and sleeping disorders: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120925171220.htm
 
Neuroscientists are trying to work out why the brain does so much when it seems to be doing nothing at all: http://www.nature.com/news/neuroscience-idle-minds-1.11440
 
Exercise fuels the brain's stress buffers: http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/exercise-stress.aspx
 
AIPC Article Library » Fundamentals of Stress and Anxiety: http://www.aipc.net.au/articles/?p=307
 
Note that you need a Twitter profile to follow a list. If you do not have one yet, visit http://twitter.com to create a free profile today!
 
Tweet Count: 3673
Follower Count: 5030
 
Intoquotes
 
"Life can be pulled by goals just as surely as it can be pushed by drives."
 
~ Viktor Frankl
 
Intoseminars
 
Many students of the Diploma of Counselling attend seminars to complete the practical requirements of their course. Seminars provide an ideal opportunity to network with other students and liaise with qualified counselling professionals in conjunction with completing compulsory coursework.
 
Not sure if you need to attend Seminars? Click here for information on Practical Assessments.
 
Below are the remainder seminars dates and locations for 2012. You can also access this information and seminar pre-requisites via our website: www.aipc.net.au/timetables.php.
 
To register for a seminar, please contact your Student Support Centre.
 
BRISBANE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 20/10, 01/12
Communication Skills II - 03/11
The Counselling Process - 24/11
Counselling Therapies I - 08-09/12
Counselling Therapies II - 27-28/10
Case Management - 10-11/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 13/10
Counselling Applications - 16/12
 
CDA Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 20/10, 01/12
Communication Skills II - 03/11
The Counselling Process - 24/11
Counselling Therapies I - 06-07/10, 8-9/12
Counselling Therapies II - 27-28/10
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 17/11
Family Therapy - 15/12
Case Management - 10-11/11
 
GOLD COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 17/11
Communication Skills II - 15/12
The Counselling Process - 27/10, 01/12
Counselling Therapies II - 23-24/11
Case Management - 19-20/10
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 27/10, 01/12
Communication Skills I - 17/11
Communication Skills II - 15/10, 15/12
Counselling Therapies II - 23-24/11
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 26/10
Case Management - 19-20/10
 
MELBOURNE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 06/10, 03/11, 01/12
Communication Skills II - 07/10, 04/11, 02/12
The Counselling Process - 27/10, 23/11, 14/12
Counselling Therapies I - 13-14/10, 10-11/11, 8-9/12
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/10, 17-18/11, 15-16/12
Case Management - 27-28/10, 24-25/11
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 27/10, 23/11, 14/12
Communication Skills I - 06/10, 03/11, 01/12
Communication Skills II - 07/10, 04/11, 02/12
Counselling Therapies I - 13-14/10, 10-11/11, 8-9/12
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/10, 17-18/11, 15-16/12
Case Management - 27-28/10, 24-25/11
 
NORTHERN TERRITORY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 01/12
Communication Skills II - 08/12
The Counselling Process - 10/11
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/11
Counselling Therapies II - 15-16/12
Case Management - 24-25/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 06/10
Counselling Applications - 27/10
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 10/11
Communication Skills I - 01/12
Communication Skills II - 08/12
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/11
Counselling Therapies II - 15-16/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 03/11
Case Management - 24-25/11
 
SOUTH AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 10/11
Communication Skills II - 11/11
The Counselling Process - 14/10, 09/12
Counselling Therapies I - 24-25/11
Case Management - 06-07/10
Counselling Applications - 13/10
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 14/10, 09/12
Communication Skills I - 10/11
Communication Skills II - 11/11
Counselling Therapies I - 24-25/11
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 08/12
Case Management - 06-07/10
 
SUNSHINE COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 10/11
Communication Skills II - 11/11
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/10
Case Management - 06-07/10
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 13/10
Counselling Applications - 03/11
 
CDA Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 10/11
Communication Skills II - 11/11
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/10
Case Management - 06-07/10
 
SYDNEY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 06/10, 15/11
Communication Skills II - 20/10, 30/11
The Counselling Process - 15/10, 03/11, 26/11, 13/12
Counselling Therapies I - 23-24/11
Counselling Therapies II - 13-14/10, 14-15/12
Case Management - 26-27/10, 06-07/12
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 04/10, 17/12
Counselling Applications - 05/10, 18/12
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 15/10, 03/11, 26/11, 13/12
Communication Skills I - 06/10, 15/11
Communication Skills II - 20/10, 30/11
Counselling Therapies I - 23-24/11
Counselling Therapies II - 13-14/10, 14-15/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 19/11
Family Therapy - 20/11
Case Management - 26-27/10, 06-07/12
 
TASMANIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 16/12
Communication Skills II - 04/11
The Counselling Process - 25/11
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/11
Counselling Therapies II - 01-02/12
Case Management - 10-11/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 21/10
Counselling Applications - 28/10
 
CDA Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 16/12
Communication Skills II - 04/11
The Counselling Process - 25/11
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/11
Counselling Therapies II - 01-02/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 09/12
Family Therapy - 14/10
Case Management - 10-11/11
 
WESTERN AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 27/10, 08/12
Communication Skills II -, 28/10, 09/12
The Counselling Process - 06/10, 03/11, 01/12
Counselling Therapies I - 24-25/11
Counselling Therapies II - 15-16/12
Case Management - 10-11/11
Counselling Applications - 04/11
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 06/10, 03/11, 01/12
Communication Skills I - 27/10, 08/12
Communication Skills II - 28/10, 09/12
Counselling Therapies I - 24-25/11
Counselling Therapies II - 15-16/12
Family Therapy - 07/10
Case Management - 10-11/11
 
Important Note: Advertising of the dates above does not guarantee availability of places in the seminar. Please check availability with the respective Student Support Centre.
 
 
   Training Courses
 
 
 
Help those around you suffering mental illness in silence: www.mhss.net.au
 

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