In this Issue

Hello!
Intothediploma
Intomhss
Intocommunity
Intocounselling
Intobookstore
Intoteam
Intoarticles
Intodevelopment
Intoconnection
Intotwitter
Intoquotes
Intoseminars

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Publications

Editor: Sandra Poletto
Email: ezine@aipc.net.au
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Copyright: 2012 Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors

Hello!
Welcome to Edition 165 of Institute Inbrief. Also called “ludomania” or “compulsive gambling”, problem gambling occurs when someone has an urge to continuously gamble despite harmful negative consequences or a desire to stop. In this edition’s featured article we explore signs, myths and facts associated with problem gambling.
 
Also in this edition:
  • MHSS Workshops
  • Lert – Our Social Responsibility Program
  • Previously Published Articles
  • Professional Development news
  • Blog and Twitter updates
  • Upcoming seminar dates
If you would like to access daily articles & resources, and interact with over 5000 peers, join our Facebook community today: www.facebook.com/counsellors. It is a great way to stay in touch and share your interest and knowledge in counselling.
 
Enjoy your reading,
 
 
Editor
 
 
Join our community:
 
 
Help those around you suffering mental illness in silence: www.mhss.net.au
 
Intothediploma
 
AIPC provides you with Flexible Course Delivery Modes
So YOU set the rules for how and when you learn...
 
AIPC’s accredited and nationally recognised Diploma of Counselling is designed so that you determine the manner and pace you study. You study entirely at your own pace (except of course if you’re receiving a government benefit such as Austudy) and you can start at any time, graduating in only 18-months.
 
Not only can you set the pace you study, you also determine the mode you want to study. You can study externally (at home with phone and email access to our counselling tutors); in-Class; online or any combination… all the time fully supported by our huge national team throughout our 8 Student Support Centres.
 
External learning means you can complete your entire course from the comfort of your home (or office, or overseas, or virtually anywhere). Your course comes complete with fully self-contained, referenced and professionally presented learning materials including 18 individual workbooks and readings. It really is as simple as working through the material and contacting us for support along the way. If you live locally to one of our support centres you can also attend tutorials to provide you with face to face contact if you wish (this option is ideal if you enjoy working more independently or have a busy schedule).
 
In-Class learning is a classroom forum where you learn with other students from a qualified lecturer. Classes are available in most main cities, at flexible times. In-Class is a great way for you to accelerate your learning, interact with other students and stay highly motivated. (This option is particularly suitable if you enjoy learning in the classroom environment with other students).
 
Online learning allows you to complete your learning entirely via your PC. You still receive all the high quality hardcopy resources (so you don’t miss out on anything!), but you’ll access all your learning materials and complete assessments online.
 
Any Combination. Of course you don’t have to stick with one learning method throughout your studies. You’re welcome to use whichever method suits your needs and desires at the time. You may choose to complete one workbook in-Class, another online, then externally. Whatever is most convenient!
 
Learn more - visit www.aipc.net.au/lz today!
 
Watch inspirational stories from some of our Graduates: www.aipc.net.au/gradvideo
 
Hear what Employers say about our Graduates: www.aipc.net.au/employervids
 
Intomhss
 
Mental Health Social Support Workshops
 
The mental health of Australians is deteriorating. And that’s putting your family, friends and colleagues at increasing risk of depression, anxiety, alcohol and drug use, and suicide.
 
The statistics are frightening:
  • 45% of adult Australians will experience a mental illness.
  • Mental illness is the leading cause of 'healthy life' lost.
  • 3 million Australians will experience a major depressive illness.
  • 26% of 16-24 year olds have experienced a mental disorder in the last 12-months.
  • Mental disorders are the leading contributor to the total burden of disease among young Australians - accounting for 49% of that total.
  • 12% of 13-17 year olds have reported having thought about suicide.
There's a very good chance that right now someone close to you is secretly and silently suffering. Unattended that suffering could lead to a serious psychological problem including depression or even suicide. If you’re not appropriately equipped, mental illness could hit someone you love with devastating consequences.
 
This is why we believe the ability to identify early onset mental illness, appropriately intervene and provide support is the most crucial life skill you can have. These are Mental Health Social Support (MHSS) skills.
 
You can acquire these critical life skills in our upcoming 2-Day MHSS Workshops. Places are strictly limited due to the interactive nature of the program. You can reserve your spot here now:
 
Parramatta, NSW: 30-31/08/12 – REGISTER HERE
Glandore, SA: 01-02/09/12 – REGISTER HERE
Fortitude Valley, QLD: 08-09/09/12 – REGISTER HERE
East Perth, WA: 18-19/09/12 – REGISTER HERE
Canning Vale, WA: 18-19/09/12 – REGISTER HERE
Berwick Area, VIC: 27-28/09/12 – REGISTER HERE
 
 
It’s very important you book now to avoid missing out.
 
If you prefer to undertake your training entirely online, visit www.mhss.net.au/lz to learn more and register for the MHSS eCourse.
 
Click here for information on CPD endorsement for counsellors and other professionals.
 
Intocommunity
 
Lert – “Why did you do it?”
 
That's the question we asked Simon Clarke, our AIPC Director, recently regarding our large investment in Lert, AIPC’s new Social Responsibility Program.
 
The answer surprised us. Here it is…
 
"Partly social conscience, partly frustration and partly belief.
 
Each year the need for counsellors gets greater. This reflects demand in the community and accords with statistics that reflect a decline in the mental health of Australians. As an educator, every day we deal with hundreds of compassionate people from around Australia (and the world) who pursue a career in counselling because they want to make a difference.
 
Yet the demand continues to outstrip supply, and the gap is widening. All the while we see governments channelling funds into programs that are motivated by political expedience above efficacy. And resultantly the community suffers.
 
I believe we’re at a tipping point. If we stand back and wait any longer for others to find the solution, the problem will become irrecoverable. We need to fill the gap. As individuals that care for our loved ones, our communities and our country, we need to act.
 
The Lert initiative is in some ways counterintuitive. If we succeed, we’re reducing demand for counsellors and hence our product. But we started AIPC with the objective of making a difference. And the heart wrenching personal stories we hear each and every day reinforces to us the impact mental illness has across the country. We just had to do something.
 
We see the greatest risk to Lert succeeding is complacency. Too often we look at a big problem and think as an individual we can’t make a difference. Lert is about empowering individuals and communities to take local action. Each Lert is a pebble thrown into the pond. If enough people, with enough compassion, join the cause then the ripples will spread across the country.”
 
You can learn more about the project here: www.lert.com.au 
 
And of course, we’d love you to join us on this exciting journey.
 
Join Lert Facebook here: www.facebook.com/RUaLert
Join Lert Twitter here: www.twitter.com/RUaLert
 
Intocounselling
 
Problem Gambling: Signs, Myths and Facts
 
Also called “ludomania” or “compulsive gambling”, problem gambling occurs when someone has an urge to continuously gamble despite harmful negative consequences or a desire to stop. It is not the gambler’s behaviour which defines whether problem gambling is occurring. Rather, it is whether the gambler or others experience harm from the gambling behaviour. At the severe end, it may be referred to as clinical “pathological gambling” if the gambler’s behaviour meets certain criteria (Wikipedia, 2012).
 
Australia’s Ministerial Council of Gambling recommended the following definition:
 
“Problem gambling is characterised by difficulties in limiting money and/or time spent on gambling which leads to adverse consequences for the gambler, others, or for the community.” (Ministerial Council on Gambling, n.d.)
 
Some groups, particularly those involved in helping problem gamblers to recover, refer to problem gambling as a “gambling addiction”, but the American Psychiatric Association (2000) considers it to be an impulse control disorder rather than strictly an addiction. That said, pathological gambling is particularly similar to substance addictions, especially in terms of how the brain’s chemistry comes to be altered as the addiction/ compulsion gains ground.
 
Symptoms of problem gambling
 
According to the DSM-IV, the manual used by doctors and mental health professionals to ascertain diagnoses, pathological gambling is considered its own diagnosis only when it occurs independently of other impulse, mood, or thought disorders. In order to be diagnosed, an individual must have at least five of the following symptoms:
 
Preoccupation. The gambler is obsessed with thoughts about gambling, having fantasies about it or recalling past experiences.
 
Tolerance. The gambler requires larger or more frequent bets to experience the same “rush”.
 
Withdrawal. The gambler feels restless or irritable with any attempts to stop or reduce gambling.
 
Escape. The person gambles to improve mood or escape problems.
 
Chasing. The gambler tries to win back gambling losses with more gambling.
 
Lying. The gambler tries to hide the extent of his or her gambling by lying to family, friends, or therapists.
 
Loss of control. The gambler has unsuccessfully attempted to reduce gambling.
 
Illegal acts. The gambler has broken the law in order to obtain gambling money or recover gambling losses. The law-breaking may include acts of theft, fraud, embezzlement, or forgery.
 
Risked significant relationship. The person gambles despite risking or losing a relationship, job, or other significant opportunity.
 
Bailout. The gambler turns to family, friends, or another third party for financial assistance as a result of gambling. (American Psychiatric Association, 2000; Wikipedia, 2012)
 
The 20-question diagnostic for compulsive gambling
 
If you are extending social support to someone who may have a gambling problem, the above diagnostic criteria are useful for your reference. In trying to help the person to acknowledge their disorder, however, you may find it easier to get them to answer these diagnostic questions offered by Gamblers Anonymous:
 
1. Did you ever lose time from work or school due to gambling?
2. Has gambling ever made your home life unhappy?
3. Did gambling affect your reputation?
4. Have you ever felt remorse after gambling?
5. Did you ever gamble to pay debts or otherwise solve financial difficulties?
6. Did gambling cause a decrease in your ambition or efficiency?
7. After losing did you feel you must return "ASAP" and win back your losses?
8. After a win did you have a strong urge to return and win more?
9. Did you often gamble until your last dollar was gone?
10. Did you ever borrow to finance your gambling?
11. Have you ever sold anything to finance gambling?
12. Were you reluctant to use “gambling money” for normal expenditures?
13. Did gambling make you careless of the welfare of yourself or your family?
14. Did you ever gamble longer than you had planned?
15. Have you ever gambled to escape worry, trouble, boredom or loneliness?
16. Have you ever committed an illegal act to finance gambling?
17. Did gambling cause you to have difficulty sleeping?
18. Do arguments or frustrations create within you an urge to gamble?
19. Did you ever have an urge to celebrate good fortune by a few hours of gambling?
20. Have you ever considered self-destruction or suicide as a result of your gambling?
 
(Gambling Addictions, 2009)
 
If an honest (not-in-denial) assessment by the person turns up an affirmative answer to at least seven of the questions, the person may need to seek treatment for pathological gambling.
 
Compulsive gambling: myth and fact
 
Have you already attempted to speak with a gambler about his or her gambling patterns? Chances are that the person overrode any concerns you might have broached about their behaviour by saying that they couldn’t possibly become addicted because they don’t gamble regularly, they don’t lose more than a few hundred dollars at a time, and they always act responsibly.
 
This is the moment when you take a deep breath and carefully help them de-bunk the following myths about gambling addiction.
 
Myth: “True problem gamblers gamble every day.” Fact: It’s not the precise frequency of the gambling that determines the addiction; some pathological gamblers may only hit the tables once a month. Rather, it is the consequences – emotional, financial, and relational – which indicate an addiction.
 
Myth: “Gambling is only an issue when the money is all gone.” Fact: The amount of money a gambler wins or loses does not determine the addiction. Usually gamblers incur enough debt that the financial consequences begin to impact on their lives, but this is not always the case. Some gamblers may win big, and then lose it all the next week.
 
Myth: “One can’t become addicted to something like gambling.” Fact: The “rush” that gamblers get – that sense of euphoria that impels the gambler to keep going with it – involves the same changes in brain chemistry that alcoholics and drug addicts experience. That is, it takes more and more of the behaviour to produce the same “high”, thus creating the cravings and accompanying withdrawal symptoms if there is no access to gambling.
 
More gambling behaviour, however, requires more money to fuel it, necessitating the increasingly larger risks taken (including illegal acts) to produce the funds to continue. When the compulsion to continue becomes overwhelming, the person is addicted, even though they may strenuously deny that they have a problem.
 
Myth: “Pathological gambling is really just a financial issue.” Fact: The problem is the obsession. Compulsive gambling is an emotional problem with financial consequences. Even if someone pays off the gambler’s debts, he or she will still be a person with an uncontrolled compulsion.
 
Myth: “Only irresponsible people have a problem with gambling.” Fact: There is a widespread misconception that people suffering from addictions are weak-willed, lazy, or “ne’er do well” types. The truth is that anyone can become addicted to gambling. Once the compulsion to gamble takes over, however, many are the people who engage in irresponsible or illegal behaviours in order to support the obsession.
 
Myth: “All gamblers are criminals.” Fact: Some gamblers do resort to criminal means, such as robbery, to support their habit, but that is not always the case. It is often because gambler feels a loss of control that he or she is driven to engage in such behaviours.
 
Myth: “A person with a gambling problem will bet on anything.” Fact: Gamblers usually have their preferred form of wagering. Someone who loves pokies, for example, may not go anywhere near the racetrack.
 
Myth: “As long as the gambler can afford it, gambling is not really a problem.” Fact: Gambling interferes with all aspects of the person’s life, not just the financial slice. Just because the person still has money to burn does not mean that their gambling is not causing problems with relationships, work, or self-esteem. It is the behaviour of gambling that is the main problem, not the financial consequences.
 
Myth: “To help a problem gambler break the addiction we would have to pay off all their debts.” Fact: NO! Bailing the gambler out might just be enabling their behaviour to continue. Of course, gamblers need to address the issue of debt and prioritise sorting out their finances, but the most important task is to end the obsession that is compelling the person to gamble; breaking the addiction is about getting the person help.
 
Myth: “We would easily be able to recognise it if a person were engaged in problem gambling.” Fact: The heroin addict may have needle marks. The alcoholic may leave empty bottles lying around, or have alcoholic breath. There are few readily observable symptoms of compulsive gambling, especially if the person is doing online gambling, which is easy to hide (adapted from Gambling Addictions, 2009).
 
This article is an extract of the upcoming Mental Health Social Support Specialty “Aiding Addicts”. For more information on MHSS, visit www.mhss.net.au.
 
References:
 
American Psychiatric Association. (2000). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (fourth edition, text revision. Washington D.C.: American Psychiatric Association.
 
American Psychiatric Association. (2000). Quick reference to the diagnostic criteria from DSM-IV-TR. Washington, D.C.: American Psychiatric Association.
 
Gambling addictions. (2009). Recognising gambling addiction. Gambling addictions: CRC Health Group. Retrieved on 8 May, 2012 from: http://www.gambling-addictions.com/recognizing-addiction.html.
 
Join our community:
 
 
Intobookstore
 
The Institute has a list of recommended textbooks and DVDs which can add great value to your learning journey - and the good news is that you can purchase them very easily. The AIPC bookstore will give YOU:
 
Discounted prices!
Easy ordering method!
Quality guarantee!
 
This fortnight's feature is...
 
Name: Theories of Psychotherapy and Counselling – Concepts and Cases, 4th edition
Authors: Sharf, R.
AIPC Code: SHARF
AIPC Price: $89.95 (RRP $99.95)
ISBN: 978-049-512-7451
 
This book gives you an in-depth understanding of the major theories in counselling & psychotherapy and how they are effectively applied. You’ll find interesting case summaries and therapist-client dialogues that enrich your understanding of each theory’s practical importance to the therapists’ work with clients.
 
To order this book, simply contact your nearest Student Support Centreor the AIPC Head Office (1800 657 667).
 
Intoteam
 
Seònaid Linn
 
Course Development
Australian Institute of Psychology
 
Seònaid obtained her BSc in Psychology (Hons) from University of Stirling, Scotland in 2008. Having completed her final year dissertation thesis on the linguistic phenomenon of ‘grapheme-colour Synaesthesia’, Seònaid developed a keen interest in phenomenology and subjectivity. Following her undergraduate degree, Seònaid spent the next three years working in a mixture of administration, marketing, community arts, and the employment sector as well as travelling in South East Asia and Australia.
 
After falling in love with Brisbane, Seònaid is now enrolled at University of Queensland in a Research Higher Degree programme carrying out participatory action research on peer support and subjectivity with a particular focus on women and ‘artivism’. Seònaid has a passion for community critical psychology, qualitative methodologies and working from social constructionist and feminist standpoints.
 
At the Australian Institute of Psychology, Seònaid is currently working on course development for the new undergraduate Bachelor of Psychological Science degree incorporating critical perspectives and innovative teaching practices into subject material. Free time is now a rarity for Seònaid but in its occurrence, she enjoys trips to the beach, music festivals and photography.
 
 
Intoarticles
 
Psychological Treatment for Anxiety Disorders
 
Anxiety disorders are highly treatable with psychological therapies, medication, or both. Combination therapies are often used, for example a combination of anti-anxiety medication and cognitive behavioural therapy has been suggested to be more effective than either one alone; however the most effective treatment will depend on each individual person’s needs and associated genetic and environmental factors (www.emedicine.com).
 
In this article we explore a range of psychological approaches to treating anxiety disorders.
 
Click here to continue reading this article.
 
 
Directive vs Non-Directive Play Therapy
 
There are two major approaches to play therapy that most orientations can be categorised in to. These are either directive approaches where the therapist assumes responsibility for guidance and interpretation of the play interactions or non-directive approaches where the therapist will tend to leave the responsibility and direction of the therapeutic process to the child (Rasmussen & Cunnigham, 1995).
 
The main difference between directive and non-directive approaches is in the role that the therapist takes on in the process.
 
Click here to continue reading this article.
 
Other articles: www.aipc.net.au/articles
 
Intodevelopment
 
Convenient Professional Development
 
Hundreds of counsellors, psychologists, social workers and allied health professionals already access over 100 CPD hours online, for less than $1 a day. Now it's your turn.
 
Mental Health Academy (MHA) is the leading provider of continuing professional development education for the mental health industry. MHA provides the largest variety of courses and videos workshops, all conveniently delivered via the internet.
 
With MHA, you no longer have to worry about high costs, proximity and availability, or fitting a workshop around your lifestyle!
 
You can access the huge range of CPD, including courses and video workshops, whenever and from wherever you want.
 
Whether you are looking for courses on anxiety and depression, or a video workshop discussing the intricacies of relationship counselling - Mental Health Academy is your gateway to over 100 hours of professional development content.
 
Take a quick look at what Mental Health Academy offers:
  • Over 70 professionally developed courses.
  • On-demand, webstreamed video workshops.
  • Over 100 hours of professional development.
  • Extremely relevant topics.
  • New courses released every month.
  • Video supported training.
  • Online, 24/7 access to resources.
  • Endorsement by multiple Associations, including AASW, ACA and APS.
Begin your journey today: www.mentalhealthacademy.com.au
 
Intoconnection
 
Have you visited theCounselling Connection Blog yet? There are over 600 interesting posts including case studies, profiles, success stories, videos and much more. Make sure you too get connected (and thank you for those who have already submitted comments and suggestions).
 
Counselling Micro Skills: A Summary
 
In this post we summarise the following eight fundamental skills that alone or together can help a client to access their deepest thoughts or clarify their future dreams: attending behaviour; questioning; responding; noting and reflecting; client Observation; confrontation; focusing and; influencing.
 
Click here to continue reading this post.
 
Get new posts delivered by email! Visit our FeedBurner subscription page and click the link on the subscription box.
 
 
Intotwitter
 
Follow us on Twitter and get the latest and greatest in counselling news. To follow, visit http://twitter.com/counsellingnews and click "Follow".
 
Featured Tweets
 
MindScience Study Groups - book your spot in this week's session (Polyvagal Theory): http://www.mindscienceinstitute.com/mssg.htm
 
AIPC Article Library » Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT): http://www.aipc.net.au/articles/?p=265
 
AIPC Article Library » Coping with the Death of a Loved One: http://www.aipc.net.au/articles/?p=266
 
MyCompass: interactive program with psych tools. Monitor mood & behaviour + motivational tips via email & SMS http://bit.ly/N0R5Wf
 
 
Q and A with a counsellor working with sex offenders: http://ct.counseling.org/2012/08/q-and-a-with-a-counselor-jason-newsome/
 
What your walk says about you ... is wrong. New research Digested: http://www.bps-research-digest.blogspot.co.uk/2012/08/what-your-walk-says-about-you-is-wrong.html
 
Note that you need a Twitter profile to follow a list. If you do not have one yet, visit http://twitter.com to create a free profile today!
 
Tweet Count: 3570
Follower Count: 4845
 
Intoquotes
 
"Every form of addiction is bad, no matter whether the narcotic be alcohol or morphine or idealism."
 
~ Carl Jung
 
Intoseminars
 
Many students of the Diploma of Counselling attend seminars to complete the practical requirements of their course. Seminars provide an ideal opportunity to network with other students and liaise with qualified counselling professionals in conjunction with completing compulsory coursework.
 
Not sure if you need to attend Seminars? Click here for information on Practical Assessments.
 
Below are the remainder seminars dates and locations for 2012. You can also access this information and seminar pre-requisites via our website: www.aipc.net.au/timetables.php.
 
To register for a seminar, please contact your Student Support Centre.
 
BRISBANE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 20/10, 01/12
Communication Skills II - 09/09, 03/11
The Counselling Process - 22/09, 24/11
Counselling Therapies I - 8-9/12
Counselling Therapies II - 27-28/10
Case Management - 10-11/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 13/10
Counselling Applications - 16/12
 
CDA Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 20/10, 01/12
Communication Skills II - 09/09, 03/11
The Counselling Process - 22/09, 24/11
Counselling Therapies I - 06-07/10, 8-9/12
Counselling Therapies II - 27-28/10
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 25/08, 17/11
Family Therapy - 08/09, 15/12
Case Management - 10-11/11
 
GOLD COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 18/08, 17/11
Communication Skills II - 15/09, 15/12
The Counselling Process - 27/10, 01/12
Counselling Therapies I - 21-22/09
Counselling Therapies II - 23-24/11
Case Management - 19-20/10
Counselling Applications - 17/08
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 27/10, 01/12
Communication Skills I - 18/08, 17/11
Communication Skills II - 15/10, 15/12
Counselling Therapies I - 21-22/09
Counselling Therapies II - 23-24/11
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 26/10
Family Therapy - 17/08
Case Management - 19-20/10
 
MELBOURNE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 01/09, 06/10, 03/11, 01/12
Communication Skills II - 02/09, 07/10, 04/11, 02/12
The Counselling Process - 29/09, 27/10, 23/11, 14/12
Counselling Therapies I - 18-19/08, 8-9/09, 13-14/10, 10-11/11, 8-9/12
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/08, 15-16/09, 20-21/10, 17-18/11, 15-16/12
Case Management - 22-23/09, 27-28/10, 24-25/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 30/09
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 29/09, 27/10, 23/11, 14/12
Communication Skills I - 01/09, 06/10, 03/11, 01/12
Communication Skills II - 02/09, 07/10, 04/11, 02/12
Counselling Therapies I - 18-19/08, 8-9/09, 13-14/10, 10-11/11, 8-9/12
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/08, 15-16/09, 20-21/10, 17-18/11, 15-16/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 30/09
Case Management - 22-23/09, 27-28/10, 24-25/11
 
NORTHERN TERRITORY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 18/08, 01/12
Communication Skills II - 22/09, 08/12
The Counselling Process - 10/11
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/11
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/08, 15-16/12
Case Management - 24-25/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 06/10
Counselling Applications - 27/10
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 10/11
Communication Skills I - 18/08, 01/12
Communication Skills II - 22/09, 08/12
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/11
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/08, 15-16/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 03/11
Family Therapy - 15/09
Case Management - 24-25/11
 
SOUTH AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 01/09, 10/11
Communication Skills II - 02/09, 11/11
The Counselling Process - 14/10, 09/12
Counselling Therapies I - 24-25/11
Counselling Therapies II - 08-09/09
Case Management - 06-07/10
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 15/09
Counselling Applications - 13/10
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 14/10, 09/12
Communication Skills I - 01/09, 10/11
Communication Skills II - 02/09, 11/11
Counselling Therapies I - 24-25/11
Counselling Therapies II - 08-09/09
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 08/12
Family Therapy - 16/09
Case Management - 06-07/10
 
SUNSHINE COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 10/11
Communication Skills II - 11/11
The Counselling Process - 29/09
Counselling Therapies I - 18-19/08
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/10
Case Management - 06-07/10
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 13/10
Counselling Applications - 03/11
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 29/09
Communication Skills I - 10/11
Communication Skills II - 11/11
Counselling Therapies I - 18-19/08
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/10
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 08/09
Family Therapy - 22/09
Case Management - 06-07/10
 
SYDNEY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 28/08, 06/10, 15/11
Communication Skills II - 31/08, 20/10, 30/11
The Counselling Process - 27/08, 22/09, 15/10, 03/11, 26/11, 13/12
Counselling Therapies I - 27-28/09, 23-24/11
Counselling Therapies II - 17-18/08, 13-14/10, 14-15/12
Case Management - 24-25/08, 26-27/10, 06-07/12
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 04/10, 17/12
Counselling Applications - 05/10, 18/12
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 27/08, 22/09, 15/10, 03/11, 26/11, 13/12
Communication Skills I - 28/08, 06/10, 15/11
Communication Skills II - 31/08, 20/10, 30/11
Counselling Therapies I - 27-28/09, 23-24/11
Counselling Therapies II - 17-18/08, 13-14/10, 14-15/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 01/09, 19/11
Family Therapy - 08/09, 20/11
Case Management - 24-25/08, 26-27/10, 06-07/12
 
TASMANIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 23/09, 16/12
Communication Skills II - 04/11
The Counselling Process - 19/08, 25/11
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/11
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/08, 01-02/12
Case Management - 10-11/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 21/10
Counselling Applications - 28/10
 
CDA Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 23/09, 16/12
Communication Skills II - 04/11
The Counselling Process - 19/08, 25/11
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/11
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/08, 01-02/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 02/09, 09/12
Family Therapy - 14/10
Case Management - 10-11/11
 
WESTERN AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 15/09, 27/10, 08/12
Communication Skills II - 16/09, 28/10, 09/12
The Counselling Process - 08/09, 06/10, 03/11, 01/12
Counselling Therapies I - 01-02/09, 24-25/11
Counselling Therapies II - 22-23/09, 15-16/12
Case Management - 25-26/08, 10-11/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 09/09
Counselling Applications - 04/11
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 08/09, 06/10, 03/11, 01/12
Communication Skills I - 15/09, 27/10, 08/12
Communication Skills II - 16/09, 28/10, 09/12
Counselling Therapies I - 01-02/09, 24-25/11
Counselling Therapies II - 22-23/09, 15-16/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 29/09
Family Therapy - 07/10
Case Management - 25-26/08, 10-11/11
 
Important Note: Advertising of the dates above does not guarantee availability of places in the seminar. Please check availability with the respective Student Support Centre.
 
 
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