In this Issue

Hello!
Intothediploma
Intodegree
Intomhss
Intoprojects
Intocounselling
Intobookstore
Intoteam
Intoarticles
Intodevelopment
Intoconnection
Intotwitter
Intoquotes
Intoseminars

Contact us

Publications

Editor: Sandra Poletto
Email: ezine@aipc.net.au
Website: www.aipc.net.au

AIPC appreciates your feedback. Please email ezine@aipc.net.au with any comments, suggestions or editorial input for future editions of Institute Inbrief.

Support Centres

Brisbane 1800 353 643
Sydney 1800 677 697
Melbourne 1800 622 489
Adelaide 1800 246 324
Sunshine Coast 1800 359 565
Port Macquarie 1800 625 329

Singapore 800 1301 333
New Zealand 0011 64 9919 4500

Join us…

If you are not already on the mailing list for Institute Inbrief, please subscribe here.

No part of this publication may be reproduced without permission. Opinions of contributors and advertisers are not necessarily those of the publisher. The publisher makes no representation or warranty that information contained in articles or advertisements is accurate, nor accepts liability or responsibility for any action arising out of information contained in this e-newsletter.

Copyright: 2012 Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors

Hello!
Welcome to Edition 162 of Institute Inbrief. Loneliness is more than a person feeling that they want to be able to connect on a social level with others – but rather it is a perceived sense of disconnection, rejection and alienation. In part 1 of this 2-part series, we explore the symptoms, causes and effects of loneliness.
 
Also in this edition:
  • MHSS Workshops
  • Previously Published Articles
  • Professional Development news
  • Blog and Twitter updates
  • Upcoming seminar dates
If you would like to access daily articles & resources, and interact with over 4900 peers, make sure you join our Facebook community today: www.facebook.com/counsellors. It is a great way to stay in touch and share your interest and knowledge in counselling.
 
Enjoy your reading,
 
 
Editor
 
 
Join our community:
 
 
Help those around you suffering mental illness in silence: www.mhss.net.au
 
Intothediploma
 
AIPC is Determined to Make Counselling an Attainable Career for You,
Just Like Over 55,000 Other Students in the Past 20 Years!
 
We have helped over 55,000 people from 27 countries pursue their dream of assisting others with a recognised Counselling qualification.
 
It's been a wonderful journey over the last 20 years (the Institute was first established in 1990). And it's been a pleasure to assist so many people realise their counselling aspirations in that time.
 
Why are so many people delighted with their studies? Our research over the years highlights three keys points...
 
Our courses and personnel have just ONE specific focus... Excellence in Counselling Education. We live and breathe counselling education! Nothing else gets in the way.
 
Exceptional value in your education investment. Our courses are always (always) much less than other providers that deliver counselling education. Our unique focus on counselling education, the large number of students undertaking our programs, and the creative way we deliver our courses provide us with cost savings that we pass on to you.
 
The flexibility to study where, when and how you want to. You can study Externally, In-Class, On-Line or any combination. And you can undertake your studies at a pace that suits you... 12 to 18 months or over 2, 3 even 4 years or more. You decide because you are in charge.
 
We understand that no two people have the same circumstances. You no doubt have issues affecting your life that are unique to you and affect the speed and manner you'd like to study. You may be working full or part-time, undertaking other studies, or may not have studied for a long time.
 
Let's face it, life is not predictable and in today's fast paced society it's important that your education is flexible enough to fit in with your other obligations. AIPC provides you with flexible course delivery modes so YOU set the rules for how and when you learn.
 
Want to find out more? Visit www.aipc.net.au/lz today!
 
Watch inspirational stories from some of our Graduates: www.aipc.net.au/gradvideo
 
Hear what Employers say about our Graduates: www.aipc.net.au/employervids
 
Intodegree
 
Bachelor of Counselling and Bachelor of Psychological Science – FINAL PLACES
 
Our Semester 2 intake for the Bachelor of Psychological Science and Bachelor of Counselling are closing this FRIDAY. There are only a handful of places left in each program.
 
You can still enrol in Semester 2, here:
 
Bachelor of Psychological Science: www.aip.edu.au/lz
Bachelor of Counselling: www.aipc.edu.au/degree
  • You can start with just 1 subject.
  • Fund your tuition with government FEE-HELP (enrol now, pay later).
  • Receive credit for prior studies.
  • Study from anywhere in Australia, even overseas.
  • [Psych] Save up to $48,800 on your qualification.
  • [Couns] Save up to $13,100 on your qualification.
  • Attend Residential Schools in Brisbane or Melbourne.
We can’t extend Semester 2 applications beyond 5pm Friday, so please act now.
 
Intomhss
 
Mental Health Social Support Workshops
 
The mental health of Australians is deteriorating. And that’s putting your family, friends and colleagues at increasing risk of depression, anxiety, alcohol and drug use, and suicide.
 
The statistics are frightening:
  • 45% of adult Australians will experience a mental illness.
  • Mental illness is the leading cause of 'healthy life' lost.
  • 3 million Australians will experience a major depressive illness.
  • 26% of 16-24 year olds have experienced a mental disorder in the last 12-months.
  • Mental disorders are the leading contributor to the total burden of disease among young Australians - accounting for 49% of that total.
  • 12% of 13-17 year olds have reported having thought about suicide.
There's a very good chance that right now someone close to you is secretly and silently suffering. Unattended that suffering could lead to a serious psychological problem including depression or even suicide. If you’re not appropriately equipped, mental illness could hit someone you love with devastating consequences.
 
This is why we believe the ability to identify early onset mental illness, appropriately intervene and provide support is the most crucial life skill you can have. These are Mental Health Social Support (MHSS) skills.
 
You can acquire these critical life skills in our upcoming 2-Day MHSS Workshops. Places are strictly limited due to the interactive nature of the program. You can reserve your spot here now:
 
It’s very important you book now to avoid missing out.
 
If you prefer to undertake your training entirely online, visit www.mhss.net.au/lz to learn more and register for the MHSS eCourse.
 
Click here for information on CPD endorsement for counsellors, nurses and other professionals.
 
Intoprojects
 
100 Stories - Raising Awareness of Mental Health Issues
 
AIPC Graduate Kylie Coulter is currently running a campaign to raise awareness of mental health issues. The campaign revolves around the creation of an electronic book with 100 true life stories from people who have suffered, struggled and dealt with a mental health issue.
 
It’s an interesting initiative – and the final result will be a book filled with strategies (both that worked and didn’t work) from those who experienced first-hand the impact of mental health illness, and were able to effectively deal with it and live fulfilling, happy lives.
 
To find out more information, including how you can submit your own story, visit:
 
 
You can also join the campaign’s Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/100Stories
 
Intocounselling
 
The Lonely Client – Symptoms, Causes and Effects of Loneliness
 
According to Murphy and Kupschik (1992), loneliness is defined as a state in which a person describes experiencing an overwhelming sense of inner emptiness and social isolation. It is, therefore, an emotional state. Loneliness is more than a person feeling that they want to be able to connect on a social level with others – but rather it is a perceived sense of disconnection, rejection and alienation.
 
The lonely client may find it difficult or even impossible to have any form of meaningful human contact. Lonely clients often experience a subjective sense of inner emptiness combined with feelings of separation and/ or isolation from the world.
 
Sometimes people feel lonely because they believe they are different from others or they believe people are indifferent to them. Loneliness and being alone are not the same. For example, a client can be in a group with others and still feel lonely; whereas, they can be alone by themselves and not necessarily feel lonely (Aspel, 2001).
 
A client may describe their experience of loneliness as that they don’t feel good enough to have friends let alone have many; feeling insignificant and unimportant when involved in interpersonal and social interactions and relying upon others to make them feel worthy (Loneliness, 2007). Clients can sometimes also suffer because of a faulty belief about themselves; for example, “If I am alone, then something must be wrong with me”.
 
There can also be symptoms relating to the client’s lack of self-love. Some clients may have also internalised the false view that to be happy is to be surrounded by others at all times, regardless of how they may feel in their presence or how they make a client feel (Loneliness, 2007).
 
If a client can learn to be intimate with themselves, then they will experience lower levels of loneliness. This could involve the counsellor assisting and supporting the client to face the negative, deficient parts of themselves, as well as teaching them to focus on the positive parts of their self. Rejection from their family during their upbringing could allow clients’ loneliness to manifest into a mild form of depression (Hartog, 1980).
 
Counselling therapy often involves encouraging the client to face and integrate their rejected parts and experiences (Loneliness, 2007). Counselling therapy and other mutually accepting relationships can offer an appropriate solution to loneliness, as clients are allowed to explore their vulnerabilities.
 
According to Peplau and Perlman (1998), the stress associated with life today can tend to make a client more vulnerable and weak to experience loneliness. A lonely client often has difficulty with coping with change. 
 
As a result loneliness can occur and be magnified when certain life or transitional changes occur for them – for example, changes in employment, job role or capacity, relationships; intimate and social, and general social isolation induced by everyone being too busy with not enough time to engage and interact with others. Social exclusion can also be a result of how we live today, contributing to loneliness.
 
Negative attitudes towards certain client groups such as single parents, and those who are long-term unemployed or those who have mental health problems, can increase a client’s sense of isolation. They may come to feel that the loneliness, which has been caused by their circumstances, is somehow their fault (Monstakes, 1996).
 
A client who seems to be constantly surrounded by people may still feel desperately lonely. Most lonely clients that a counsellor will work with in the counselling process are usually able to function in that they are often able to hold down a job, be in a significant relationship and juggle responsibilities. However, they still feel an overwhelming sense of internal emptiness.
 
Warwick (2006) suggests that loneliness gives a client the awareness that they are deficient at and in relationships. A further complication of this is that without social and interpersonal contact with others a client will only have a surge in their feelings of isolation, resulting in them retracting from participating in social transactions to a point where they feel they do not need to interact with others, hence becoming alone.
 
All of which are symptoms if the client’s loneliness has a negative impact on their self-worth and self-esteem, which could limit or impair their ability to function. These feelings begin to have a negative effect on their emotional well-being and functioning capacity (Murphy, 1992).
 
According to Rotenberg and Hymel (1999), there is a distinct difference between loneliness and the condition of chronic loneliness. Chronic loneliness can be an indicator of social maladjustment and/ or dysfunction. For example, chronic loneliness in children can result in social incompetence and socially inappropriate behaviours such as bullying, academic failure, feeling different all of which lead to a child becoming more lonely and isolated by their peers. All of which has the implication to impact on a child’s health social development psychological, emotional and physical well-being (Rotenberg et al, 1999).
 
In adults, loneliness has been found to be a major antecedent of depression and alcoholism. It appears at an increasing rate to be the associated cause of a range of medical problems, some of which take decades to show up (Rotenberg et al, 1999). For example, heart disease, stroke, obesity, mental illness, etc.
 
Being lonely can exacerbate client’s feelings of misrepresentation, abandonment, rejection, depression, insecurity and anxiety both internally and when with others externally (Spengler, 1999). Prolonged experience of these feelings can eventually prevent a client from being able to obtain and maintain healthy, functioning relationship patterns and lifestyles over their life. Low self-esteem can often be identified as a trigger social withdrawal which has been identified as a precursor to the experience of loneliness (Rotenberg and Hymel, 1999).
 
Loneliness can be:
  • Situational – bought on by a change in circumstances, such as moving to a new environment.
  • Developmental – the need for intimacy coupled with the need for time by yourself is a process that develops throughout the lifespan.
  • Internal – which is unrelated to the external situation or age-and-stage, it is often seen in client’s with low self-esteem and vulnerability, probably stemming from their early years.
(Counselling, 2007)
 
Loneliness and solitude
 
A process of separation from significant begins at birth and, subsequently, feeling alone can be a healthy, required human emotion and, choosing to be alone for a period of solitude can be enriching for a person (Hartog et al, 1980).
 
According to Rouber (1998), there are times throughout everyone’s life where loneliness will exist. However, this does not have to be a negative experience of isolation but rather it could occur through choice, within our own control or circumstance. Loneliness in this context is more about having time alone or being by ourselves which can be enjoyed as a positive, relaxing and pleasurable experience of ‘time out’.
 
Solitude on the other hand is an emotional state of intentionally being on our own, away from others by choice. Loneliness can often be seen different to solitude in that it is solitude not under the client’s perceived control.
 
In our busy culture, with its focus on being with others, aloneness and solitude seem to be defined as the same thing and they are thought in a negative way. For many people, the word lonely conjures up images of an isolated figure. Loneliness can be made more intense by what a client depending on how they perceive it. Subsequently, there are misconceptions about loneliness as described below:
  • "Loneliness is a sign of personal weakness."
  • "There's something wrong with me and I must be different if I'm lonely. I should be able to go out and have fun."
  • "None of my friends seem to feel the way I do."
(Counselling loneliness, 2006)
 
These misconceptions regarding loneliness are based on the premise that loneliness results from a defect in personality. Research suggests that clients who think of loneliness as a defect tend to have the following difficulties:
 
Difficulty in social risk taking, in being able to assert themselves to make contact with others, in being able to talk freely and comfortably about themselves and finding topics of discussion, partaking in activities with others and are generally anxious at being judged by others
 
They are less able to self-disclose and be spontaneous or responsive to others in communication, often have a general distrust of others which allows them to sabotage interpersonal transactions before they occur.
 
(Counselling loneliness, 2006)
 
Symptoms of loneliness
 
Loneliness is an overwhelming feeling. However, as discussed earlier, it is in some part normal and is often healthy for clients to experience a degree of loneliness such as having alone time. Loneliness becomes complicated when a client has the innate need or desire to base their self-worth solely on their ability to interact socially rather than realise there needs to be a balance between time with others respecting their opinion – and becoming assertive and connecting with our values and self-worth in a strong way rather than allowing others to determine it (Aspel, 2001).
 
Further, Aspel (2001) states that being comfortable with loneliness is a balancing act, a see-sawing between the search for intimacy and an acceptance of isolation that continues throughout the lifespan. However smoothly this rite of passage from birth to adulthood goes, there will be times in a client’s life when this process of growing up, of becoming separate selves (identity), is difficult; and at times a client will experience feelings of abandonment, unloved, insecurity, in other words, they will feel lonely.
 
Lonely clients often describe feeling depressed, angry, afraid, and misunderstood. They are generally critical of themselves, overly sensitive or self-pitying, and they may become critical of others. When these feelings happen, lonely clients can begin to do things to perpetuate their loneliness. Some clients, for example, become discouraged, lose their sense of desire and motivation to get involved in new situations, and isolate themselves from people and activities all together on purpose.
 
Other clients deal with loneliness by becoming too quickly involved and committed to people and activities without understanding or evaluating the consequences of their involvement. They will later find themselves in unsatisfying relationships or over-committed to work or extracurricular activities (Counselling loneliness, 2006). This can also serve as a way a client compensates for their loneliness initially by immersing themselves in work or social activities.
 
The counsellor can observe and look for the symptoms of loneliness in order to develop a plan that will assist the client to resolve the feelings of and associated with loneliness. A lonely client may present having experienced some or all of the following:
  • They feel unappreciated
  • They feel that no one wants to understand them
  • They feel they cannot connect to others
  • They feel they are different from others
  • They feel they will always be rejected
  • They sometimes feel sad and empty
  • They feel like a victim.
(Counselling loneliness, 2006)
 
In summary, a client can feel lonely:
  • When they are alone and they perceive that they have no control of this
  • When they do not feel part of a social circle
  • When there is no one with whom to share their feelings and experiences
  • When they feel disconnected and alienated from their surroundings.
(Counselling loneliness, 2006)
 
Loneliness can make a client feel:
  • Disrespected and useless
  • Socially incompetent and isolated
  • Convinced that there is something wrong with them (this may also be observed as an indulgence in “victim mentality”)
  • Self-conscious
  • Angry and untrusting of others.
(Warwick, 2006)
 
In summary, experiencing these feelings can be a consequence of low self-esteem and self-worth which results in the lonely client becoming reluctant to pursue social relationships, which escalates their sense of loneliness.
 
Causes of loneliness
 
Like any other emotion, loneliness can be complex. This can be due to the way in which the loneliness evolves. For example, loneliness may be the cause of a client’s unhappiness or it may be a result of the client going through a change i.e. relocating houses, results in the clients not being able to see their friends as often etc.
 
Change and personal, intrinsic factors are the biggest causes of loneliness. If a person is predisposed to being resistant to change or not being able to cope with it then the result will at some point be loneliness. Further, if the change is not within the client’s control then loneliness is more likely to occur as well i.e. if there is a relationship breakdown and they are not the one ending it then this change is out of their control, and in some ways a clients will feel that the change is forced upon them which can result in their experience being one sided, painful and negative.
 
It is also expected that a client will feel vulnerable and lonely after the loss of a significant other. This is part of the normal grief process. However, if the client’s grief becomes complicated then the counsellor needs to be aware and acknowledge that the client will need to work through their grief first to enable their feelings of loneliness to abate as their grief does.
 
In contrast, clients who disclose that they get a lot of attention can also describe feeling lonely. This is because they believe that they are only valued by others because of something they possess i.e. status, material possessions, lifestyle or money which, if they lost, would mean they were worthless.   This is due to a faulty or negative belief system.
 
Loneliness can be exacerbated by a psychological problem or mental illness. For example, a client who is suffering from depression may commence to retreat from their life and that withdrawal can exacerbate their feelings and perceptions of loneliness (Peplau, 1998).
 
A lack of social interaction during childhood and adolescence, or the absence of meaningful role models can also be causes for adult loneliness. Combined with loneliness being a symptom of another social or psychological problem i.e. chronic depression or anxiety. Loneliness can also represent a dysfunction of communication. Assisting a client to learn how to cope with changes in life patterns is an essential part in a client overcoming loneliness (Rouber, 1998).
 
Clients who are predisposed to being anxious, depressed or experiencing addictive behaviour will also have low self-esteem and feelings guilt and worthlessness. Especially, the thought of having to be social and meet new people are a common experience in the lonely client.
 
Thinking of themselves as being 'different' to others can often make a client feel lonely i.e. culture, race, ethnicity, religion, socio-economic status, etc. The counsellor needs to be aware of such differences when approached to counsel the lonely client.
 
Effects of loneliness
 
Clients who feel lonely report poor sleep and eating patterns and subsequently have diminished body restorative processes. This then impacts on the client’s ability to function normally and can make them more susceptible to illness or becoming sick from stress. Loneliness can be seen to also have a negative impact on a client’s learning and memory capacity (Weiss, 1973).
 
Social withdrawal is a significant consequence of a client becoming lonely. This can be unknown to the client as they progressively retreat and remove themselves form social situations as a result of not feeling that they are able to contribute (due to a poor or underdeveloped level of self-understanding, self-esteem and confidence).
 
Social isolation is another consequence resulting from loneliness. This means that clients experiencing loneliness no longer feel comfortable or confident to socialise with others. They may blame others for not calling or contacting them but a lonely person loses their ability to connect and interact with others resulting in isolation.
 
A diminishing level of social competence can also be an effect of loneliness. Social competence refers to a client’s ability to communicate confidently, competently and assertively with others. Their interpersonal transactions are reciprocal, validated and appropriate. The only client loses their ability to apply effective communication skills and withdraws themselves from social contact and situations therefore, becoming reclusive and passive.
 
In the next edition we’ll explore various counselling strategies for dealing with the lonely client.
 
References:
 
Aspel, Melaine, Ann., (2001). Let’s talk about feeling lonely. New York: Rosen Publishing.
 
Counselling, (2007), retrieved on 26 October, 2007. Retrieved from http://www.couselling.cam.ac.uk.
 
Counselling loneliness, (2006), retrieved on 24 October, 2007. Retrieved from http://www.couns.uiuc.edu/brochures.
 
Hartog, Joseph, Ralph Andy, J., Cohen, Yehudi, A., (1980). New York: International University Press.
 
Loneliness, (2007), retrieved on 25 October, 2007. Retrieved from http://www.uoregon.edu/~counsel.
 
Murphy, P.M., Kupshik, G.A. (1992). Loneliness, stress and well-being; a helper’s guide. London; New York: Tavistock/Routledge.
 
Peplau, Letitia Ann, Perlman, Daniel, (1982). Loneliness: a source of current theory, research and therapy. Ann Arbor, Mich.: U.M.I.
 
Rotenberg, Ken, J., Hymel, Shelly, (1999). Loneliness in childhood and adolescence. Cambridge, U.K.; New York: Cambridge University Press.
 
Rouber, L. (1998). Loneliness. Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press.
 
Spengler, James, Conrad (1975). A phenomenological explication of loneliness. Ann Arbor, Mich.: University Microfilms International.
 
Warwick, (2006), retrieved on 25 October, 2007. Retrieved from http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services.  
 
Join our community:
 
 
Intobookstore
The Institute has a list of recommended textbooks and DVDs which can add great value to your learning journey - and the good news is that you can purchase them very easily. The AIPC bookstore will give YOU:
  • Discounted prices!
  • Easy ordering method!
  • Quality guarantee!
This fortnight's feature is...
 
Name: Issues and Ethics in the Helping Professions
Authors: Corey, Corey and Callanan
AIPC Code: COREY1
AIPC Price: $84.60 (RRP $94.00)
ISBN: 978-053-461-4430
 
Up-to-date and comprehensive, the authors provide readers with the basis for discovering their own guidelines within the broad limits of professional codes of ethics and divergent theoretical positions.
 
To order this book, simply contact your nearest Student Support Centre or the AIPC Head Office (1800 657 667).
 
Intoteam
 
Carlos Rivera-Santana
 
Lecturer
Australian Institute of Psychology
 
Carlos Rivera-Santana is a Lecturer with the Australian Institute of Psychology. From Aguada in Puerto Rico, Carlos is an early career academic that is mainly interested in Critical Psychology, Critical Methodologies, Social Movements, Community Psychology, Colonization, Critical Theory, Cultural Diversity, Social Theory, Psychoanalysis, Postmodern Thought and other topics that are emerging as his research practice unfolds.
 
Carlos acquired his Bachelor Degree in Psychology at the University of Puerto Rico (UPR) after being in the United States Armed Forces. Later he earned his Research Masters Degree in Social-Community Psychology in the UPR. He has been involved in Public Policy and Psychology, Social Movements with underrepresented communities in Puerto Rico, in Critical Methodologies such as Discourse Analysis, Action Research with the Dominican community in Puerto Rico, and social action through Amnesty International Puerto Rico Chapter.
 
Carlos has been an active member of the Puerto Rican Psychology Association (was a Board Member), Amnesty International and is part of the Steering Committee of Psychology for Social Responsibility. Carlos has published in local publications in Puerto Rico, United States, Turkey and internationally. At the moment, his main topics for publication are Colonization and Critical Methodologies.
 
Carlos is currently completing his PhD in the University of Queensland about “The Notion of Colonization and its Manifestations in Puerto Rico and Australia”. His supervisor is Dr. David Fryer the Head of Research in the Australian Institute of Psychology. He is heavily influenced by his Critical Psychology framework and also the works of Michel Foucault, Critical Theory and the Frankfurt School, Linda Tuhiwai Smith and her Decolonizing approach, Giogio Agamben, Ignacio Martin Baró, Dolores Miranda, Walter Mingnolo, etc.
 
 
Intoarticles
 
The Opening Micro-skills
 
“First impressions stick.”
 “You never get a second chance to make a first impression.”
 
If there is any truth in these two popular notions, then anyone working with a helpee (e.g. a therapy client, a friend, a family member, etc.) within the context of providing mental health support should not underestimate the usefulness and importance of opening micro-skills.
 
Click here to continue reading this article...
 
 
Sudden Unemployment – Reactions and Emotions
 
Unfortunately ‘organisational restructuring’ and ‘downsizing’ are common events in today’s workplace. For those individuals who suddenly lose their job, financial pressures can be overwhelming. Most support individuals receive focus on supporting the individual financially. However even under the best conditions where someone has ample savings and decent job prospects, suddenly losing a job is an emotional ride.
 
The emotional stress which individuals and their families experience is the least thought about effect of unemployment. For many people work is a central component to their identity. When their employment status changes, so too can their self identity. This together with the financial strain can be a very stressful and negative time.
 
Click here to continue reading this article...
 
Other articles: www.aipc.net.au/articles
 
Intodevelopment
 
Convenient Professional Development
 
Hundreds of counsellors, psychologists, social workers, mental health nurses and allied health professionals already access over 100 Hours of Professional Development online, for less than $1 a day. Now it's your turn.
 
Mental Health Academy (MHA) is the leading provider of professional development education for the mental health industry. MHA provides the largest variety of courses and videos workshops, all conveniently delivered via the internet.
 
With MHA, you no longer have to worry about high costs, proximity and availability, or fitting a workshop around your lifestyle!
 
You can access the huge range of PD, including courses and video workshops, whenever and from wherever you want.
 
Whether you are looking for courses on anxiety and depression, or a video workshop discussing the intricacies of relationship counselling - Mental Health Academy is your gateway to over 100 hours of professional development content.
 
Take a quick look at what Mental Health Academy offers:
  • Over 70 professionally developed courses.
  • On-demand, webstreamed video workshops.
  • Over 100 hours of professional development.
  • Extremely relevant topics.
  • New courses released every month.
  • Video supported training.
  • Online, 24/7 access to resources.
  • Endorsement by multiple Associations, including AASW, ACA and APS.
Begin your journey today. Click on the link below to register for a monthly or annual unlimited membership. As an unlimited member, you can access all MHA courses for less than $1 per day, and receive discounts when purchasing any video workshops:
 
 
 
Intoconnection
Have you visited theCounselling Connection Blog yet? There are over 550 interesting posts including case studies, profiles, success stories, videos and much more. Make sure you too get connected (and thank you for those who have already submitted comments and suggestions).
 
Defining Intimacy
 
“Intimacy demands the highest risk but yields the richest reward. Intimacy is the driving force which makes the painful grit of life worthwhile. Intimacy is the life-giving beam of light, whereby we discover each other from the inside out, never quite fully, never entirely, but enough to find an exquisite inner oasis that replenishes us on our life’s journey.” ~ Teresa Adams (as cited in Hanna, 1991).
 
Intimacy is a difficult concept to define as it is possible to have intimate interactions with many people including a partner, family member or friend. Different levels of intimacy may be experienced from person to person such as having intimate interactions between one’s mother compared to one’s partner. As well as this, intimacy may be difficult to define as it is often used interchangeably with having a sexual encounter or having a verbal disclosure with someone (Hanna, 1991).
 
Click here to continue reading this post...
 
Get new posts delivered by email! Visit our FeedBurner subscription page and click the link on the subscription box.
 
 
Intotwitter
 
Follow us on Twitter and get the latest and greatest in counselling news. To follow, visit http://twitter.com/counsellingnews and click "Follow".
 
Featured Tweets
 
ZFVC releases Issues Paper on family violence data: http://nzfvc.org.nz/?q=node/677
 
Parental separation from an adolescent perspective: What do they say? http://www.aifs.gov.au/cfca/pubs/papers/a142071/index.html
 
Exposure to Violence Has Long-Term Stress Effects Among Adolescents: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120703162630.htm
 
Quick hits for July 2: Interesting reads for counselors from around the Internet: http://ct.counseling.org/2012/07/quick-hits-for-july-2-interesting-reads-for-counselors-from-around-the-internet-2/
 
Learn more about The MindScience Institute's Study Groups, led by industry speaker Richard Hill: http://www.mindscienceinstitute.com/mssg.htm
 
What does the way you count on your fingers say about your brain? http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/blog/2012/jun/26/count-fingers-brain
 
Sleep deprivation effect on the immune system mirrors physical stress: Severe sleep loss jolts the immune system... http://tinyurl.com/6wkwjnq
 
Note that you need a Twitter profile to follow a list. If you do not have one yet, visit http://twitter.com to create a free profile today!
 
Tweet Count: 3475
Follower Count: 4715
 
Intoquotes
 
"Pray that your loneliness may spur you into finding something to live for, great enough to die for."
 
~ Dag Hammarskjold
 
Intoseminars
 
Many students of the Diploma of Counselling attend seminars to complete the practical requirements of their course. Seminars provide an ideal opportunity to network with other students and liaise with qualified counselling professionals in conjunction with completing compulsory coursework.
 
Not sure if you need to attend Seminars? Click here for information on Practical Assessments.
 
Below are the remainder seminars dates and locations for 2012. You can also access this information and seminar pre-requisites via our website: www.aipc.net.au/timetables.php.
 
To register for a seminar, please contact your Student Support Centre.
 
BRISBANE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 04/08, 20/10, 01/12
Communication Skills II - 09/09, 03/11
The Counselling Process - 22/09, 24/11
Counselling Therapies I - 8-9/12
Counselling Therapies II - 21-22/07, 27-28/10
Case Management - 10-11/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 13/10
Counselling Applications - 11/08, 16/12
 
CDA Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 04/08, 20/10, 01/12
Communication Skills II - 09/09, 03/11
The Counselling Process - 22/09, 24/11
Counselling Therapies I - 06-07/10, 8-9/12
Counselling Therapies II - 21-22/07, 27-28/10
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 25/08, 17/11
Family Therapy - 08/09, 15/12
Case Management - 10-11/11
 
GOLD COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 18/08, 17/11
Communication Skills II - 15/09, 15/12
The Counselling Process - 21/07, 27/10, 01/12
Counselling Therapies I - 21-22/09
Counselling Therapies II - 23-24/11
Case Management - 19-20/10
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 03/08
Counselling Applications - 17/08
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 21/07, 27/10, 01/12
Communication Skills I - 18/08, 17/11
Communication Skills II - 15/10, 15/12
Counselling Therapies I - 21-22/09
Counselling Therapies II - 23-24/11
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 26/10
Family Therapy - 17/08
Case Management - 19-20/10
 
MELBOURNE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 05/08, 01/09, 06/10, 03/11, 01/12
Communication Skills II - 11/08, 02/09, 07/10, 04/11, 02/12
The Counselling Process - 04/08, 29/09, 27/10, 23/11, 14/12
Counselling Therapies I - 14-15/07, 18-19/08, 8-9/09, 13-14/10, 10-11/11, 8-9/12
Counselling Therapies II - 21-22/07, 25-26/08, 15-16/09, 20-21/10, 17-18/11, 15-16/12
Case Management - 28-29/07, 22-23/09, 27-28/10, 24-25/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 15/07, 30/09
Counselling Applications - 28/07
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 04/08, 29/09, 27/10, 23/11, 14/12
Communication Skills I - 05/08, 01/09, 06/10, 03/11, 01/12
Communication Skills II - 11/08, 02/09, 07/10, 04/11, 02/12
Counselling Therapies I - 14-15/07, 18-19/08, 8-9/09, 13-14/10, 10-11/11, 8-9/12
Counselling Therapies II - 21-22/07, 25-26/08, 15-16/09, 20-21/10, 17-18/11, 15-16/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 15/07, 30/09
Family Therapy - 12/08
Case Management - 28-29/07, 22-23/09, 27-28/10, 24-25/11
 
NORTHERN TERRITORY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 18/08, 01/12
Communication Skills II - 23/07, 22/09, 08/12
The Counselling Process - 10/11
Counselling Therapies I - 14-15/07, 17-18/11
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/08, 15-16/12
Case Management - 21-22/07, 24-25/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 06/10
Counselling Applications - 27/10
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 10/11
Communication Skills I - 18/08, 01/12
Communication Skills II - 23/07, 22/09, 08/12
Counselling Therapies I - 14-15/07, 17-18/11
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/08, 15-16/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 03/11
Family Therapy - 15/09
Case Management - 21-22/07, 24-25/11
 
SOUTH AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 14/07, 01/09, 10/11
Communication Skills II - 15/07, 02/09, 11/11
The Counselling Process - 05/08, 14/10, 09/12
Counselling Therapies I - 28-29/07, 24-25/11
Counselling Therapies II - 08-09/09
Case Management - 21-22/07, 06-07/10
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 15/09
Counselling Applications - 13/10
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 05/08, 14/10, 09/12
Communication Skills I - 14/07, 01/09, 10/11
Communication Skills II - 15/07, 02/09, 11/11
Counselling Therapies I - 28-29/07, 24-25/11
Counselling Therapies II - 08-09/09
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 04/08, 08/12
Family Therapy - 16/09
Case Management - 21-22/07, 06-07/10
 
SUNSHINE COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 04/08, 10/11
Communication Skills II - 05/08, 11/11
The Counselling Process - 29/09
Counselling Therapies I - 18-19/08
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/10
Case Management - 06-07/10
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 13/10
Counselling Applications - 14/07, 03/11
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 29/09
Communication Skills I - 04/08, 10/11
Communication Skills II - 05/08, 11/11
Counselling Therapies I - 18-19/08
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/10
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 08/09
Family Therapy - 22/09
Case Management - 06-07/10
 
SYDNEY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 28/08, 06/10, 15/11
Communication Skills II - 14/07, 31/08, 20/10, 30/11
The Counselling Process - 02/08, 27/08, 22/09, 15/10, 03/11, 26/11, 13/12
Counselling Therapies I - 27-28/07, 27-28/09, 23-24/11
Counselling Therapies II - 17-18/08, 13-14/10, 14-15/12
Case Management - 24-25/08, 26-27/10, 06-07/12
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 30/07, 04/10, 17/12
Counselling Applications - 31/07, 05/10, 18/12
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 02/08, 27/08, 22/09, 15/10, 03/11, 26/11, 13/12
Communication Skills I - 28/08, 06/10, 15/11
Communication Skills II - 14/07, 31/08, 20/10, 30/11
Counselling Therapies I - 27-28/07, 27-28/09, 23-24/11
Counselling Therapies II - 17-18/08, 13-14/10, 14-15/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 23/07, 01/09, 19/11
Family Therapy - 24/07, 08/09, 20/11
Case Management - 24-25/08, 26-27/10, 06-07/12
 
TASMANIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 23/09, 16/12
Communication Skills II - 05/08, 04/11
The Counselling Process - 19/08, 25/11
Counselling Therapies I - 14-15/07, 17-18/11
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/08, 01-02/12
Case Management - 11-12/08, 10-11/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 21/10
Counselling Applications - 29/07, 28/10
 
CDA Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 23/09, 16/12
Communication Skills II - 05/08, 04/11
The Counselling Process - 19/08, 25/11
Counselling Therapies I - 14-15/07, 17-18/11
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/08, 01-02/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 02/09, 09/12
Family Therapy - 14/10
Case Management - 11-12/08, 10-11/11
 
WESTERN AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 04/08, 15/09, 27/10, 08/12
Communication Skills II - 05/08, 16/09, 28/10, 09/12
The Counselling Process - 14/07, 08/09, 06/10, 03/11, 01/12
Counselling Therapies I - 01-02/09, 24-25/11
Counselling Therapies II - 21-22/07, 22-23/09, 15-16/12
Case Management - 25-26/08, 10-11/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 09/09
Counselling Applications - 11/08, 04/11
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 14/07, 08/09, 06/10, 03/11, 01/12
Communication Skills I - 04/08, 15/09, 27/10, 08/12
Communication Skills II - 08/07, 05/08, 16/09, 28/10, 09/12
Counselling Therapies I - 01-02/09, 24-25/11
Counselling Therapies II - 21-22/07, 22-23/09, 15-16/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 29/09
Family Therapy - 11/08, 07/10
Case Management - 25-26/08, 10-11/11
 
Important Note: Advertising of the dates above does not guarantee availability of places in the seminar. Please check availability with the respective Student Support Centre.
 
 
   Training Courses
 
 
 
Help those around you suffering mental illness in silence: www.mhss.net.au  
 

Counselling & Psychology Courses

Educational Resources

Community Projects

Contact Us | Copyright Notice | e-Communications Policy