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Intothediploma
Intoeducation
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Intocounselling
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Intodevelopment
Intoconnection
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Copyright: 2012 Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors

Hello!
Welcome to Edition 161 of Institute Inbrief. This edition’s featured article explores the demographics of suicide in Australia, what factors tend to correlate with completed suicide, and what some of the common myths surrounding suicides and the suicidal are.
 
Also in this edition:
  • Bach of Counselling and Bach of Psych Science - Sem 2 2012 Intake
  • Training opportunities
  • Previously Published Articles
  • Professional Development news
  • Blog and Twitter updates
  • Upcoming seminar dates
If you would like to access daily articles & resources, and interact with over 4800 peers, make sure you join our FB community today: www.facebook.com/counsellors. It is a great way to stay in touch and share your interest and knowledge in counselling.
 
Enjoy your reading,
 
 
Editor
 
 
Join our community:
 
 
Help those around you suffering mental illness in silence: www.mhss.net.au
 
Intothediploma
 
AIPC provides you with Flexible Course Delivery Modes
So YOU set the rules for how and when you learn...
 
AIPC’s accredited and nationally recognised Diploma of Counselling is designed so that you determine the manner and pace you study. You study entirely at your own pace (except of course if you’re receiving a government benefit such as Austudy) and you can start at any time, graduating in only 18-months.
 
Not only can you set the pace you study, you also determine the mode you want to study. You can study Externally (at home with phone and email access to our counselling tutors), In-Class, Online or any combination… all the time fully supported by our huge national team throughout our 8 Student Support Centres.
 
External learning means you can complete your entire course from the comfort of your home (or office, or overseas, or virtually anywhere!). Your course comes complete with fully self-contained, referenced and professionally presented learning materials including 18 individual workbooks and readings. It really is as simple as working through the material and contacting us for support along the way. If you live locally to one of our support centres you can also attend tutorials to provide you with face to face contact if you wish (this option is ideal if you enjoy working more independently or have a busy schedule).
 
In-Class learning is a classroom forum where you learn with other students from a qualified lecturer. Classes are available in most main cities, at flexible times. In-Class is a great way for you to accelerate your learning, interact with other students and stay highly motivated. (This option is particularly suitable if you enjoy learning in the classroom environment with other students).
 
Online learning allows you to complete your learning entirely via your PC. You still receive all the high quality hardcopy resources (so you don’t miss out on anything!), but you’ll access all your learning materials and complete assessments online.
 
Any Combination. Of course you don’t have to stick with one learning method throughout your studies. You’re welcome to use whichever method suits your needs and desires at the time. You may choose to complete one workbook In-Class, another Online, then Externally. Whatever is most convenient!
 
Learn more - visit www.aipc.net.au/lz today!
 
Watch inspirational stories from some of our Graduates: www.aipc.net.au/gradvideo
 
Hear what Employers say about our Graduates: www.aipc.net.au/employervids
 
Intoeducation
 
Bachelor of Counselling and Bachelor of Psychological Science Intake – CLOSING
 
The Semester 2 2012 intake for our Bachelor of Counselling and Bachelor of Psychological Science is closing soon. If you’re interested in studying these programs this year, you must submit your interest immediately.
 
Here are some facts about the courses:
  • Receive up to 1.5 Semesters academic credit for prior Diploma studies.
  • Access government jobs and higher wages.
  • Learn from home anywhere in Australia, even overseas.
  • Most cost effective counselling and psychology degree available.
  • Enrol now and pay later with government FEE-HELP.
  • Practical skills honed at residential schools in Brisbane and Melbourne*.
You can submit your obligation free expression of interest (or enrol) in the Bachelor of Psychological Science here: www.aip.edu.au/lz
 
And the Bachelor of Counselling here: www.aipc.edu.au/degree
 
*Residential Schools at our Academic Rooms in Melbourne are available for the Bachelor of Counselling degree and Core subjects of the Bachelor of Psychological Science degree.
 
Intomhss
 
Mental Health Social Support Workshops
 
The mental health of Australians is deteriorating. And that’s putting your family, friends and colleagues at increasing risk of depression, anxiety, alcohol and drug use, and suicide.
 
The suicide rate is now around double the road toll. A report released in May 2012 shows that young men’s mental illness in costing the Australian economy more than $3 billion each year in lost productivity.
 
And the World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that by 2020, depression will be the second leading disability causing disease in the world; labelling the dramatic increase a “global depression pandemic”.
 
If you’re not appropriately equipped, mental illness could hit someone you love with devastating consequences.
 
This is why we believe the ability to identify early onset mental illness, appropriately intervene and provide support is the most crucial life skill you can have. These are Mental Health Social Support (MHSS) skills.
 
You can acquire these critical life skills in our upcoming 2-Day MHSS Workshops. Places are strictly limited due to the interactive nature of the program. You can reserve your spot here now:
It’s very important you book now to avoid missing out.
 
If you prefer to undertake your training entirely online, visit www.mhss.net.au/lz to learn more and register for the MHSS eCourse.
 
Click here for information on CPD endorsement for counsellors, nurses and other professionals.
 
Intocounselling
 
Understanding Suicide: Statistics, Characteristics and Myths
 
Psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud called suicide “murder turned around 180 degrees”, or more wryly, “a very poor response to a very bad day”. Also called “self-murder” or “self-killing”, suicide is the act of deliberately or intentionally taking one’s own life. It is an attempt to solve a problem of intense emotional pain with impaired problem-solving skills (Kalafat, J. & Underwood, M., n.d.).
 
Suicidal behaviour is any deliberate action that has potentially life-threatening consequences, such as taking a drug overdose or deliberately crashing a car (Dyer, 2006). Attempted suicide is a potentially self-injurious act committed with at least some intent to die as a result of the act. Individuals of all races, creeds, incomes, and educational levels die by suicide (Kalafat, J. & Underwood, M, n.d.; Clayton, J., n.d.).
 
Little of the above information will be new to most readers. What may be new and surely more challenging is to come to grips with the what, how, and why of this tragic human act of self-inflicted, self-intentioned cessation. Who tends to complete suicide: are they men or women? How old are they? Where do they come from? How do they do it? How does Australia stack up in terms of suicide frequency relative to other countries? What are some elements that most suicides have in common?
 
This article will give you more details of the demographics of suicide in Australia, what factors tend to correlate with completed suicide, and what some of the common myths surrounding suicides and the suicidal are.
 
Suicide statistics in Australia
 
Number of suicides: The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) keeps records on the causes of death in Australia. In any given year, the number of people who killed themselves can only be a preliminary statistic, because the door is kept open for two years for additional suicides that will be determined by coroners’ reports which are ongoing at the close of the year. Thus, in 2009 (the latest year for which finished data are available, published in 2011), 2132 deaths by suicide were registered in Australia (ABS, 2011).
 
Some of the more salient trends in the breakdown of that overall number are:
  • This is a rate of 9.6 per 100,000 people (compared to, say, the Bahamas: one of the lowest countries, at 1.2; the United Kingdom, at 6.9; the United States at 11; New Zealand at 11.7; or Lithuania, the highest at 34.1 per 100,000) (WHO, 2007).
  • Male suicides accounted for 77 per cent of the deaths.
  • Suicide comprises 22.1 per cent of all deaths among young men between 15 and 24.
  • By comparison, 1417 people died by motor vehicle accidents in the same period.
Age and gender of suicides: In breaking down the statistics by age group and gender, we see that:
  • Men have the most significant variations between age groups, with 85+ year old men committing suicide at a rate of 28.2 per 100,000.
  • 15 – 19 year old men are the lowest male group, at 9.3 per 100,000.
  • The highest age group for women is the 50 – 54 year old age group, at 8.8 per 100,000.
  • The lowest age group for women is 15 – 19 years of age, at 3.4 per 100,000.
Suicide rates by state/ territory: If we compare suicide rates by state/territory, we find, in ascending order per 100,000 people for the years of 2005 to 2009:
  • New South Wales: 7.9
  • Victoria: 9.3
  • Queensland: 11.2
  • Western Australia: 11.8
  • South Australia: 12.1
  • Tasmania, 15.1
  • Northern Territory, 20.1
  • Australian Capital Territory, 9.7 (ABS, 2011)
Percentage of all deaths: Looking at suicide as a percentage of all deaths, we find that 1.6 per cent of all deaths were due to suicide in 2004, but that varied greatly between age groups. Suicide accounted for 22 per cent of all deaths for those aged 20 to 34, and 27 per cent of deaths for men age 25 to 29 years (Heuvel, 2006).
 
How are they doing it (method of suicide):
  • Nearly half (49 per cent) of male suicide deaths in 2004 were by hanging.
  • Poisoning accounted for 28 per cent of male suicide deaths.
  • Hanging and poison accounted for the same percentage (40 per cent each) in female suicides.
  • Death by firearms and explosives has continued to decline from 420 suicides in 1994 (19 per cent of suicide deaths in that year) to 169 deaths by these methods in 2004 (representing 8 per cent of suicide deaths). (Heuvel, 2006)
Suicide among Aboriginal people: The Australian Bureau of Statistics does not publish statistics for suicide deaths of Aboriginal people for Victoria, Tasmania, and the ACT due to comparatively small numbers, but for the other states, suicide accounted for 4.2 per cent of all deaths of Aboriginal people in the remaining states and territories, compared to 1.5 per cent of deaths among non-Aboriginal people (Heuvel, 2006).
 
Common elements of suicide
 
A leading authority on suicide, psychologist Edwin Shneidman, has described ten characteristics that are commonly associated with completed suicide. While he notes that no single explanation can account for all self-destructive behaviour, the following list includes frequently-occurring features that may help us to get a handle on what suicide is often about to the suicidal.
 
We have re-interpreted Dr Shneidman’s ten characteristics into a mnemonic to help you remember them. The acronym is COPPINGOUT, as follows:
 
Constriction is the cognitive state.
Oblivion is the goal: the cessation of consciousness.
Psychological pain is the stimulus.
Purpose is to seek a solution.
Intention is communicated interpersonally beforehand.
Needs are frustrated.
Getting out – escaping – is the desired action.
Overriding emotion is hopelessness-helplessness.
Underlying attitude is ambivalence.
Time-worn coping patterns are again employed.
 
Let’s unpack those a little bit.
 
Constriction is the cognitive state: A person thinking of dying by suicide often has a rigid and narrow pattern of cognition: like tunnel vision. Rather than engaging in problem-solving behaviours, the person tends to see his or her options in extreme, all-or-nothing terms. The person’s cognitive state is not conducive to good decision-making.
 
Oblivion is the goal: the cessation of consciousness: Rather than continue to be obsessed with hugely distressing thoughts, the person who would die by suicide seeks the end of conscious experience. Suicide appears to offer oblivion.
 
Psychological pain is the stimulus: Suicidal people feel intense and excruciating emotions of guilt, shame, sadness, anger, and fear, often arising from multiple sources, and it is the pain of these that motivates the desire to suicide.
 
Purpose is to seek a solution: When people find themselves in an unbearable situation, suicide may appear to be a preferable solution to continuing in the dire circumstances. Emotional distress and/or physical disability may be feared by the person more than death. Perpetrators of criminal acts about to be caught by authorities have sometimes preferred suicide (such as by jumping in front of a train or shooting themselves) to facing justice and a life behind bars (or possibly being executed by the death penalty). Whatever the horrific situation, suicide is not a random or pointless act; it is an answer to a seemingly insolvable problem.
 
Intention is what is communicated interpersonally: One of the most dangerous misconceptions about suicide is the idea that people who really want to kill themselves don’t talk about it. Schneidman estimates that in at least 80 per cent of completed suicides, people have communicated their lethal intentions to others, usually by telling people about their plans, but also by behavioural means (more on pre-suicide behaviours later).
 
Needs are frustrated: Frustrated psychological needs make someone more vulnerable to suicidal ideation. People who have very high standards and expectations can feel especially disappointed when progress towards their goals is thwarted. If they attribute the failure or disappointment to their own shortcomings, they may come to see themselves as worthless, unlovable, or incompetent: a perfect set-up for suicide.
 
For young people, particularly, career/employment issues, family conflict, and other interpersonal frustrations can precipitate suicide. Similarly, studies have found that, in periods of high unemployment, suicide rates go up (Yang, B., Motohashi, Y., & Lester, D., 1992).
 
Getting out – escaping – is the desired action: Suicide seems to provide a way out of painful self-awareness and/or intolerable circumstances: a definite way out.
 
Overriding emotion is hopelessness-helplessness: Even more central to predicting suicidal behaviour than intense negative emotions (such as fear, anger, or sadness), is the pervasive sense that the future is hopeless, and that no one can do anything to help. Pessimism breeds suicide.
 
Underlying attitude is ambivalence: For all the intensity of negative emotion and sincere desire to die, however, there is simultaneously in most suicides an equally strong wish to find a way out of the dilemma. Thus, suicide contemplation is about intense ambivalence. The skilled social support person can tap into this ambivalence, helping the person to swing to the “want to find a way out of the dilemma” pole.
 
Time-worn coping patterns are again employed: Not surprisingly, people thinking about killing themselves generally use the same patterns of thought and ways of coping to deal with the current crisis as they have always used. If someone is habitually a loner, refusing to ask others for help or believing that no one can help, that person is likely to act from a stance of isolation in the lead-up to the suicide as well (Oltmanns & Emery, n.d.).
 
Common misconceptions about suicide
 
The World Health Organisation estimates that about million people die by suicide each year (World Health Organization, 2004). Understanding what drives people to take their own life is not easy for those who are not enmeshed in intolerable pain themselves; thus, myths and misconceptions tend to proliferate about this very final act. It is important to de-bunk these, however, if we would extend genuinely compassionate support.
 
Myth Number 1: The people who talk about it don’t do it.
 
Fact: Research has shown that 75 – 80 per cent of all people who died by suicide and almost every person who attempted suicide made attempts to communicate to others in the weeks or months leading up to the attempt/suicide that they were in deep despair. Sometimes the only warning was in statements like, “You’ll be sorry when I’m gone” or “I can’t see any way out” (Smith, M., Segal, J., & Robinson, L., 2012; Ainsworth, 2011).
 
Unfortunately, because most suicidal people are ambivalent about dying, they may make such statements either in a joking manner or in some way which is not congruent with the seriousness of the situation – and they are not taken seriously. The person hearing the statement discounts or otherwise dismisses it.
 
Myth Number 2: Anyone that would kill themselves is just insane.
 
Fact: The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services estimates that, while 90 per cent of people who commit suicide suffer from one or more mental disorders (including depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and alcoholism), only an estimated 10 per cent of suicidal people are actually psychotic or possessing delusional beliefs about reality (Smith et al, 2012; Florida Office of Drug Control, 2009).
 
The other 90 per cent are depressed, anxious, grief-stricken, or despairing, but not mentally ill, apart from the depression or anxiety (Ainsworth, 2011). Many depressed people go about their daily business quite adequately. It is important for the support person to note, however, that the absence of craziness does not mean the absence of suicide risk.
 
Myth Number 3: If someone is going to kill himself, nothing can stop him.
 
Fact: Even the most severely depressed person has intensely conflicting feelings about dying by suicide, and most waver in indecision until the very last moment. That ambivalence is shown by the fact that the person is still in the flesh. The fact that he or she is alive right now is proof that at least part of him or her still wants to live. As we have noted, there is another part that wants not death so much as the cessation of pain. The impulse to end it all is overpowering, but it does not last forever. Your job as support person, should you choose to accept it, is to strengthen the part of the person that wants to live, by helping them to understand that suicide applies a permanent solution to what is a temporary problem; other solutions can be found.
 
Myth Number 4: People who commit suicide are people who were unwilling to seek help.
 
Fact: Studies show that over half of the people who died by suicide sought medical help in the six months before their deaths. Statistics available for the elderly show that 80 per cent of seniors who suicide visited their general practitioner (G.P.) within 30 days; 40 per cent were seen within the previous week; and 20 per cent saw their G.P. on the same day as the suicide (The Statewide Office of Suicide Prevention, 2008).
 
Yes, it’s true that many depressed people who contemplate ending their pain through suicide are afraid that, by trying to get help, they will bring more pain on themselves in the form of criticism (such as being told that they are stupid, selfish, sinful, or manipulative), rejection, punishment (such as suspension from school or work), or involuntary commitment. But the slender hope to find a different solution will keep many pressing ahead despite these risks.
 
By talking to you, a suicidal person is taking a huge risk, but it is a compliment to you, too. It is a statement that, somehow, you seem to be more caring, more capable of coping with adversity, or more able to protect the person’s confidentiality than others. It is a cry for help, and it is a positive, courageous thing that the person is doing in confiding in you about their suicidal urges.
 
Myth Number 5: Talking about suicide may give someone the idea to do it.
 
Fact: A suicidal person doesn’t get morbid ideas by talking about suicide; the person already has them. The opposite is true; by bringing up the question and discussing it openly, you are showing the person that you care about them, that you take them seriously, and that you are willing to let them share their pain with you. By asking whether the person is suicidal, you are giving them the opportunity to release pent-up and painful feelings. Any discussion will help you to determine how far along the way to completion their plans are.
 
Myth Number 6: The problems weren’t enough to commit suicide over.
 
Remember, it is not how bad the problem is; it is how badly it is hurting the person who has it (Ainsworth, 2011). As human beings, we all have our strengths and growing edges. It is those edges – our “Achilles heels” – that function as the weak links in our chain of problem-solving. What is a nuisance factor to one person might be an overwhelming problem for someone else.
 
Myth Number 7: Improvement following a suicide attempt or crisis means that the risk is over.
 
Fact: Most suicides occur within days or weeks of “improvement” when the individual has the energy and motivation to actually follow through with his/her suicidal thoughts (Clayton, J., n.d.).
 
This article is an extract of the upcoming Mental Health Social Support Specialty “Supporting the Suicidal and Suicide-Bereaved". For more information on MHSS, visit www.mhss.net.au.
 
References:
 
Australian Bureau of Statistics (2011). Causes of death Australia, 2009 – Catalog No 3303.0. ABS: Canberra. In Fact Sheet 3: Statistics on suicide in Australia. Retrieved on 19 March, 2012, from: http://www.livingisforeveryone.com.au/IgnitionSuite/uploads/docs/LIFE%20 factsheet_3_web. PDF.
 
Clayton, J. Suicide Prevention: Saving Lives One Community at a Time. American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. http://www.afsp.org/files/Misc_//standardizedpresentation.ppt.
 
Dyer, K.A. (2006). Definition of Suicide. About.com Guide, updated 18 November, 2006. Retrieved on 19 March, 2012 from: http://dying.about.com/od/glossary/g/suicide.htm
 
Heuvel, A.V. (2006). Australian suicide statistics – key findings. Australian Network for Promotion, Prevention and Early Intervention for Mental Health. Retrieved on 19 March, 2012 from: www.auseinet.com
 
Kalafat, J. & Underwood, M. (undated) Making Educators Partners in Suicide Prevention. . Lifelines: A School-Based Youth Suicide Prevention Initiative. Society for the Prevention of Teen Suicide. Retrieved from: http://spts.pldm.com/
 
Oltmanns, T.F. & Emery, R.E. (undated). Understanding suicide – common elements. From Survivors of Suicide site. Retrieved on 21 March, 2012 from: http://www.SurvivorsOfSuicide.com
 
Reachout.com. (2012). Suicide: wanting to end your life. Retrieved on 19 March, 2012 from: http://au.reachout.com/ Site operated by Inspire Foundation.
 
The Statewide Office of Suicide Prevention. (2008). 2008 Annual Report. Retrieved from:
 
World Health Organization (2004). Suicide; huge but preventable public health problem, WHO(press release).
 
World Health Organization. (2007). WHO Mortality Database: www.who.int/whosis/database/ mort/table1.cfm In Fact Sheet 3: Statistics on suicide in Australia. Retrieved on 19 March, 2012, from: http://www.livingisforeveryone.com.au/IgnitionSuite/uploads/docs/LIFE%20 factsheet_3_web.PDF.  
 
Yang, B., Motohashi, Y., & Lester, D. (1992). The impact of the economy on suicide and homicide rates in Japan and the United States. International Journal of Social Psychiatry, December, 1992, 38 (4) 314-317. Retrieved on 21 March, 2012 from Doi: 10.1177/002076409203800411.
 
Join our community:
 
 
Intobookstore
The Institute has a list of recommended textbooks and DVDs which can add great value to your learning journey - and the good news is that you can purchase them very easily. The AIPC bookstore will give YOU:
  • Discounted prices!
  • Easy ordering method!
  • Quality guarantee!
This fortnight's feature is...
 
Name: Theory & Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy, 8th edition
Authors: Corey, G
AIPC Code: COREY
AIPC Price: $98.95 (RRP $109.95)
ISBN: 978-049-510-2083
 
Corey’s current conscientious and student-friendly book shows you how to put eleven key counselling theories into practice and helps you develop the counselling method that’s right for you.
 
To order this book, simply contact your nearest Student Support Centre or the AIPC Head Office (1800 657 667).
 
Intoarticles
 
Counselling Techniques to Reduce Stress
 
How do we cope with stress? There are literally thousands of books, articles and websites that cover stress and stress management. However, the ancient and natural ways are probably still the best ways towards peace and serenity. The old adage, ‘prevention is better than cure’ is certainly true for stress management. Below are three counselling techniques counsellors can utilise with clients.
 
Click here to continue reading this article...
 
 
Different Modes of Clinical Supervision
 
In the context of ongoing professional development after original training, clinical supervision is a key factor in aiding psychotherapists to function in complex work environments (Lambie & Sias, 2009). Supervision is a process that allows ongoing observation and intervention to a supervisee while they are putting into practice skills they have learned.
 
It is the process of supervision that promotes; the supervisee’s development, the refinement of the supervisee’s counselling skills, the monitoring and enhancing of the therapeutic relationship and the client’s welfare (Tromski-Klingshirn & Davis, 2007).
 
Click here to continue reading this article...
 
Other articles: www.aipc.net.au/articles
 
Intodevelopment
 
Convenient Professional Development
 
Hundreds of counsellors, psychologists, social workers, mental health nurses and allied health professionals already access over 100 Hours of Professional Development online, for less than $1 a day. Now it's your turn.
 
Mental Health Academy (MHA) is the leading provider of professional development education for the mental health industry. MHA provides the largest variety of courses and videos workshops, all conveniently delivered via the internet.
 
With MHA, you no longer have to worry about high costs, proximity and availability, or fitting a workshop around your lifestyle!
 
You can access the huge range of PD, including courses and video workshops, whenever and from wherever you want.
 
Whether you are looking for courses on anxiety and depression, or a video workshop discussing the intricacies of relationship counselling - Mental Health Academy is your gateway to over 100 hours of professional development content.
 
Take a quick look at what Mental Health Academy offers:
  • Over 70 professionally developed courses.
  • On-demand, webstreamed video workshops.
  • Over 100 hours of professional development.
  • Extremely relevant topics.
  • New courses released every month.
  • Video supported training.
  • Online, 24/7 access to resources.
  • Endorsement by multiple Associations, including AASW, ACA and APS.
Begin your journey today. Click on the link below to register for a monthly or annual unlimited membership. As an unlimited member, you can access all MHA courses for less than $1 per day, and receive discounts when purchasing any video workshops:
 
 
 
Intoconnection
Have you visited theCounselling Connection Blog yet? There are over 550 interesting posts including case studies, profiles, success stories, videos and much more. Make sure you too get connected (and thank you for those who have already submitted comments and suggestions).
 
A Dilemma on Therapeutic Boundaries
 
You work as a family counsellor for a community service organisation. As a counsellor you are required to see your clients at their own home to offer counselling support. You have been working for quite some time with Lucy, a single mother with 2 kids (boys). However, you have been unable to develop good rapport with this client. After you last visit to Lucy’s home you feel that she is starting to develop rapport and is feeling more comfortable to open up and disclose her issues.
 
One week has passed and you are looking forward to continue building your relationship with Lucy. However, when you get to Lucy’s home she looks very distressed. One of her kids is feeling very sick and couldn’t go to school. Lucy wants to take him to see a doctor, but she doesn’t have a car, her house is 3 miles away from the closest bus stop and she discloses to you that she does not have enough money to pay for a taxi.
 
Click here to continue reading this post...
 
Get new Counselling Connection posts delivered by email! Simply visit our FeedBurner subscription page and click the link on the subscription box: http://feeds.feedburner.com/CounsellingConnection.
 
 
Intotwitter
Follow us on Twitter and get the latest and greatest in counselling news. To follow, visit http://twitter.com/counsellingnews and click "Follow".
 
Featured Tweets
 
AIPC Article Library » A Case Using Rational Emotive Behaviour Therapy: http://www.aipc.net.au/articles/?p=68
 
 
 
Crowdsourcing is transforming the science of psychology: http://www.economist.com/node/21555876 
 
Facilitated physical activity as a treatment for depressed adults (paper): http://www.bmj.com/content/344/bmj.e2758
 
 
Bipolar disorder in young people: http://www.psychology.org.au/Content.aspx?ID=4149
 
Note that you need a Twitter profile to follow a list. If you do not have one yet, visit http://twitter.com to create a free profile today!
 
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Intoquotes
"People love others not for who they are but for how they make them feel."
 
~ Irwin Federman
 
Intoseminars
Many students of the Diploma of Counselling attend seminars to complete the practical requirements of their course. Seminars provide an ideal opportunity to network with other students and liaise with qualified counselling professionals in conjunction with completing compulsory coursework.
 
Not sure if you need to attend Seminars? Click here for information on Practical Assessments.
 
Below are the remainder seminars dates and locations for 2012. You can also access this information and seminar pre-requisites via our website: www.aipc.net.au/timetables.php. 
 
To register for a seminar, please contact your Student Support Centre.
 
BRISBANE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 04/08, 20/10, 01/12
Communication Skills II - 23/06, 09/09, 03/11
The Counselling Process - 07/07, 22/09, 24/11
Counselling Therapies I - 16-17/06, 6-7/10, 8-9/12
Counselling Therapies II - 21-22/07, 27-28/10
Case Management - 14-15/06, 10-11/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 13/10
Counselling Applications - 11/08, 16/12
 
CDA Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 04/08, 20/10, 01/12
Communication Skills II - 23/06, 09/09, 03/11
The Counselling Process - 07/07, 22/09, 24/11
Counselling Therapies I - 16-17/06, 6-7/10, 8-9/12
Counselling Therapies II - 21-22/07, 27-28/10
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 25/08, 17/11
Family Therapy - 08/09, 15/12
Case Management - 14-15/06, 10-11/11
 
GOLD COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 18/08, 17/11
Communication Skills II - 16/06, 15/09, 15/12
The Counselling Process - 21/07, 27/10, 01/12
Counselling Therapies I - 21-22/09
Counselling Therapies II - 23-24/11
Case Management - 19-20/10
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 03/08
Counselling Applications - 17/08
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 21/07, 27/10, 01/12
Communication Skills I - 18/08, 17/11
Communication Skills II - 16/06, 15/10, 15/12
Counselling Therapies I - 21-22/09
Counselling Therapies II - 23-24/11
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 26/10
Family Therapy - 17/08
Case Management - 19-20/10
 
MELBOURNE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 07/07, 05/08, 01/09, 06/10, 03/11, 01/12
Communication Skills II - 08/07, 11/08, 02/09, 07/10, 04/11, 02/12
The Counselling Process - 01/07, 04/08, 29/09, 27/10, 23/11, 14/12
Counselling Therapies I - 16-17/06, 14-15/07, 18-19/08, 8-9/09, 13-14/10, 10-11/11, 8-9/12
Counselling Therapies II - 23-24/06, 21-22/07, 25-26/08, 15-16/09, 20-21/10, 17-18/11, 15-16/12
Case Management - 30/06-01/07, 28-29/07, 22-23/09, 27-28/10, 24-25/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 15/07, 30/09
Counselling Applications - 28/07
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 01/07, 04/08, 29/09, 27/10, 23/11, 14/12
Communication Skills I - 07/07, 05/08, 01/09, 06/10, 03/11, 01/12
Communication Skills II - 08/07, 11/08, 02/09, 07/10, 04/11, 02/12
Counselling Therapies I - 16-17/06, 14-15/07, 18-19/08, 8-9/09, 13-14/10, 10-11/11, 8-9/12
Counselling Therapies II - 23-24/06, 21-22/07, 25-26/08, 15-16/09, 20-21/10, 17-18/11, 15-16/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 15/07, 30/09
Family Therapy - 12/08
Case Management - 30/06-01/07, 28-29/07, 22-23/09, 27-28/10, 24-25/11
 
NORTHERN TERRITORY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 18/08, 01/12
Communication Skills II - 23/07, 22/09, 08/12
The Counselling Process - 07/07, 10/11
Counselling Therapies I - 14-15/07, 17-18/11
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/08, 15-16/12
Case Management - 21-22/07, 24-25/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 06/10
Counselling Applications - 27/10
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 07/07, 10/11
Communication Skills I - 18/08, 01/12
Communication Skills II - 23/07, 22/09, 08/12
Counselling Therapies I - 14-15/07, 17-18/11
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/08, 15-16/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 16/06, 03/11
Family Therapy - 15/09
Case Management - 21-22/07, 24-25/11
 
SOUTH AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 14/07, 01/09, 10/11
Communication Skills II - 15/07, 02/09, 11/11
The Counselling Process - 05/08, 14/10, 09/12
Counselling Therapies I - 28-29/07, 24-25/11
Counselling Therapies II - 23-24/06, 08-09/09
Case Management - 21-22/07, 06-07/10
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 15/09
Counselling Applications - 16/06, 13/10
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 05/08, 14/10, 09/12
Communication Skills I - 14/07, 01/09, 10/11
Communication Skills II - 15/07, 02/09, 11/11
Counselling Therapies I - 28-29/07, 24-25/11
Counselling Therapies II - 23-24/06, 08-09/09
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 04/08, 08/12
Family Therapy - 17/06, 16/09
Case Management - 21-22/07, 06-07/10
 
SUNSHINE COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 04/08, 10/11
Communication Skills II - 05/08, 11/11
The Counselling Process - 30/06, 29/09
Counselling Therapies I - 18-19/08
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/10
Case Management - 23-24/06, 06-07/10
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 13/10
Counselling Applications - 14/07, 03/11
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 30/06, 29/09
Communication Skills I - 04/08, 10/11
Communication Skills II - 05/08, 11/11
Counselling Therapies I - 18-19/08
Counselling Therapies II - 20-21/10
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 08/09
Family Therapy - 22/09
Case Management - 23-24/06, 06-07/10
 
SYDNEY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 06/07, 28/08, 06/10, 15/11
Communication Skills II - 18/06, 14/07, 31/08, 20/10, 30/11
The Counselling Process - 21/06, 02/07, 02/08, 27/08, 22/09, 15/10, 03/11, 26/11, 13/12
Counselling Therapies I - 15-16/06, 27-28/07, 27-28/09, 23-24/11
Counselling Therapies II - 29-30/06, 17-18/08, 13-14/10, 14-15/12
Case Management - 22-23/06, 24-25/08, 26-27/10, 06-07/12
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 30/07, 04/10, 17/12
Counselling Applications - 31/07, 05/10, 18/12
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 21/06, 02/07, 02/08, 27/08, 22/09, 15/10, 03/11, 26/11, 13/12
Communication Skills I - 06/07, 28/08, 06/10, 15/11
Communication Skills II - 18/06, 14/07, 31/08, 20/10, 30/11
Counselling Therapies I - 15-16/06, 27-28/07, 27-28/09, 23-24/11
Counselling Therapies II - 29-30/06, 17-18/08, 13-14/10, 14-15/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 23/07, 01/09, 19/11
Family Therapy - 24/07, 08/09, 20/11
Case Management - 22-23/06, 24-25/08, 26-27/10, 06-07/12
 
TASMANIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 24/06, 23/09, 16/12
Communication Skills II - 05/08, 04/11
The Counselling Process - 19/08, 25/11
Counselling Therapies I - 14-15/07, 17-18/11
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/08, 01-02/12
Case Management - 11-12/08, 10-11/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 17/06, 21/10
Counselling Applications - 29/07, 28/10
 
CDA Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 24/06, 23/09, 16/12
Communication Skills II - 05/08, 04/11
The Counselling Process - 19/08, 25/11
Counselling Therapies I - 14-15/07, 17-18/11
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/08, 01-02/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 02/09, 09/12
Family Therapy - 08/07, 14/10
Case Management - 11-12/08, 10-11/11
 
WESTERN AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 04/08, 15/09, 27/10, 08/12
Communication Skills II - 08/07, 05/08, 16/09, 28/10, 09/12
The Counselling Process - 14/07, 08/09, 06/10, 03/11, 01/12
Counselling Therapies I - 01-02/09, 24-25/11
Counselling Therapies II - 21-22/07, 22-23/09, 15-16/12
Case Management - 25-26/08, 10-11/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 16/06, 09/09
Counselling Applications - 11/08, 04/11
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 14/07, 08/09, 06/10, 03/11, 01/12
Communication Skills I - 07/06, 04/08, 15/09, 27/10, 08/12
Communication Skills II - 08/07, 05/08, 16/09, 28/10, 09/12
Counselling Therapies I - 01-02/09, 24-25/11
Counselling Therapies II - 21-22/07, 22-23/09, 15-16/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 29/09
Family Therapy - 11/08, 07/10
Case Management - 25-26/08, 10-11/11
 
Important Note: Advertising of the dates above does not guarantee availability of places in the seminar. Please check availability with the respective Student Support Centre.
 
 
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