AIPC Institute InBrief
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In this Issue

in here
bullet Hello!
bullet Intothediploma
bullet Intoeducation
bullet IntoMHSS
bullet Intocounselling
bullet Intobookstore
bullet Intoarticles
bullet Intodevelopment
bullet Intoconnection
bullet Intotwitter
bullet Intoquotes
bullet Intoseminars
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Editor: Sandra Poletto
Email: ezine@aipc.net.au
Website: www.aipc.net.au

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Copyright: 2012 Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors

Hello!
Welcome to Edition 156 of Institute Inbrief. Stress is not a diagnosis but a process happening over time. The level and extent of stress a person may feel depends a great deal on their attitude to a particular situation. An event which may be extremely stressful for one person can be a minor event in another person's life.
 
This edition’s featured article explores fundamental concepts behind stress and anxiety, including the different types of stress; the ‘fight or flight’ response; and the general adaptation syndrome.
 
Also in this edition:
  • Training opportunities
  • Previously Published Articles
  • Professional Development news
  • Blog and Twitter updates
  • Upcoming seminar dates
If you would like to access daily articles & resources, and interact with over 4500 peers, make sure you join our Facebook community today: www.facebook.com/counsellors. It is a great way to stay in touch and share your interest and knowledge in counselling.
 
Enjoy your reading,
 
 
Editor
 
 
Join our community:
 
 
Help those around you suffering mental illness in silence: www.mhss.net.au/lz
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Intothediploma
 
Imagine Being Passionate About Your Work
And Assisting People Every Day Lead Better Lives
 
It’s rare these days to hear people talk about their work with true passion. You hear so many stories of people working to pay the bills; putting up with imperfect situations; and compromising on their true desires.
 
That’s why it’s always so refreshing to hear regular stories from graduates living their dream to be a Counsellor. They’re always so full of energy, enthusiasm and passion. There’s no doubt that counselling is one of the most personally rewarding and enriching professions.
 
Just imagine someone comes to you for assistance. They’re emotionally paralysed by events in their life. They can’t even see a future for themselves. They can only focus on their pain and grief. The despair is so acute it pervades their entire life. Their relationship is breaking down and heading towards a divorce. They can’t focus on work and are getting in trouble with their boss. They feel they should be able to handle their problems alone, but know they can’t. It makes them feel helpless, worthless. Their self-esteem has never been lower. They’re caught in a cycle of destruction and pain.
 
Now imagine you have the knowledge and skills to help this person overcome their challenges. You assist to relieve their intense emotional pain. You give them hope for the future. You assist to rebuild their self-esteem and lead a satisfying, empowered life.
 
As a Counsellor you can experience these personal victories every day. And it’s truly enriching. There is nothing more fulfilling than helping another person overcome seemingly impossible obstacles.
 
Watch inspirational stories from some of our Graduates: www.aipc.net.au/gradvideo
 
Hear what Employers have to say about AIPC Graduates: www.aipc.net.au/employervids
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Intoeducation
 
Learn How You Can Gain Specialty Expertise and a Graduate Qualification with a Vocational Graduate Certificate or Vocational Graduate Diploma in Counselling...
 
...In Only 6 to 12 Months
 
More and more Counsellors are gaining advanced specialist skills with a Vocational Graduate qualification. Vocational Graduate qualifications provide a higher level, vocational alternative to traditional Post Graduate courses offered by Universities.
 
It's time and cost effective, meaning you can gain a formal graduate qualification in 6 to 12 months in your specialist area. Here's how a graduate qualification can advance your career:
  • Develop a deeper understanding of your area of interest and achieve more optimal outcomes with your clients.
  • A graduate qualification will assist you move up the corporate ladder from practitioner to manager/ supervisor.
  • Make the shift from being a generalist practitioner to a specialist.
  • Gain greater professional recognition from your peers.
  • Increase client referrals from allied health professionals.
  • Maximise job opportunities in your preferred specialty area.
  • Formalise years of specialist experience with a respected qualification.
Save Over $6,000 (67% Discount to Market)
 
A Vocational Graduate Diploma at a university costs between $10,000 and $38,000. BUT, you don’t have to pay these exorbitant amounts for an equally high quality qualification. You can do your qualification with the Institute and save a massive $6,000+ on the cost of doing a similar course at university.
 
To learn more, please visit www.aipc.net.au/vgd. Alternatively, call your nearest Institute branch on the FreeCall numbers shown below.
 
Sydney: 1800 677 697
Melbourne: 1800 622 489
Perth: 1800 246 381
Brisbane: 1800 353 643
Adelaide: 1800 246 324
Regional NSW: 1800 625 329
Regional QLD: 1800 359 565
Gold Coast: 1800 625 359
NT/Tasmania: 1800 353 643
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IntoMHSS
Research has identified that healthy, educated social support networks are crucial to the mental health of communities. In fact, early intervention through social support is likely the best mechanism a community has to mitigate against the onset of mental illness, and support those in the early stages of escalating mental health problems.
 
Mental Health Social Support (MHSS) trains you to identify the signals of early onset mental illness, support skills and how and when to refer to a professional. MHSS is one of the most crucial life skills that everyone should have, as each and every one of us has a duty of care to our loved ones and colleagues.
 
Upcoming Workshops
 
In this 2-day workshop you will learn:
  • Fundamentals of mental health.
  • How to identify the signs and symptoms of mental health problems.
  • How to help people in the early stages of mental health problems.
  • Introduce you to common mental illnesses such as anxiety disorders, depression, substance abuse disorders, psychotic disorders (schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, etc) and more.
  • Improve your knowledge, understanding and language of mental health.
  • Know where and how to get help.
  • Understand what types of help are effective - and which aren't.
  • Reduce the stigma associated with mental illness.
  • Plus much more.
Western Australia
 
Location: 1/95 Bannister Rd, Canning Vale, Western Australia
Trainer: Merrilyn Hughes
Trainer ID: FAC179-8
Cost: $595 (includes workbook and online assessment)
 
Dates: March 17 & 18, March 22 & 23, April 19 & 20
 
How to register: Call (08) 9256 3663 or Email merrilyn@keystonecounselling.com.au
 
Victoria
 
Location: 4/2A Myra Street, Seaford, Victoria
Trainer: Anne Gallagher
Trainer ID: FAC203-7
Cost: $595 (includes workbook and online assessment)
 
Dates: March 16 & 17, March 19 & 20
 
How to register: Call 0411 6271 79 or Email anneg688@gmail.com
 
Online Training
 
If you prefer to undertake Mental Health Social Support training entirely online, visit www.mhss.net.au/lz to learn more and register for the MHSS eCourse.
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Intocounselling
 
Fundamentals of Stress and Anxiety
 
Although never quite adequately defined, vague generalisations such as “stress and tension are normal reactions to events that threaten us” are used to describe it. Such threats can come from accidents, financial troubles and problems on the job or with family and through our emotional and physical reactions to the given situations, we become what is termed ‘stressed’.
 
Not that long ago, the terms of worry, anxiety, fear, impatience, and anger gave way to what has been formally termed ‘stress’ and its offshoots, stressful, stress-related, and stressed-out. Further complicating matters is the fact that different people react to the same “stress” in unpredictable ways.
 
Stress is not a diagnosis but a process happening over time. The level and extent of stress a person may feel depends a great deal on their attitude to a particular situation. An event which may be extremely stressful for one person can be a minor event in another person's life.
 
Stress is not always a bad thing because some people thrive on it and even need it to get things done. However, when the term ‘stress’ is used in a clinical sense, it generally refers to a situation that causes discomfort and distress for a person and that is the area we will look at in this article.
 
Regardless of who you are or what you do, chances are you spend a lot of time entrenched in the busyness of life, worrying about getting everything done, and feeling out of control. We feel obligations and pressures which are both physical and mental and the attached stress, which can be quite debilitating, is not always obvious to us.
 
Most people don't handle their stress well. They focus on the unpleasant and unexpected things that happen daily. This should just be called ‘life’; however, we need to learn to handle the stressors that life sends our way.
 
There is a major difference between stressors - those things that happen every day that have the potential for driving us crazy, or making us angry, frustrated, and hurt, and stress - the way we choose to respond to these stressors. You make a choice about how situations will affect the rest of your day.
 
We cannot help but allow our daily routines to take over our lives. Working, studying, running the errands, groceries, kids, deadlines, projects, budgeting - the list can go on and on. And the things that are supposed to make our lives essentially easier are the same things that often cause us the most stress. For example, think about your computer, your car, and all the gadgets in your household that just happen to breakdown right when they are most needed.
 
Backaches, headaches, strokes, migraines, sleeplessness, anger and hostility etc. are showing us that we are more stressed than ever before. Even our hobbies and interests are stressful and demanding activities. 
 
Different types of Stress
 
One of the reasons why people have a hard time ending stress is that they are not addressing the core issues within their lives. Following are six categories of stress.
 
1. Work/Study-Related Stress
The workplace and the school are very stressful environments. Deadlines are a major cause of Work/Study Related Stress. Other factors that might contribute to this type of stress are conflict with your boss/co-workers and/or teachers, changes that happen abruptly, where you cannot cope with them, threats to job security, or a fear of having a failing mark.
 
2. Relationship/Family Related Stress
Family related stress includes divorce/separation issues, extra-marital affairs, child-rearing, teenage break ups and unwanted pregnancies among others. This area is a major stressor for most people and oftentimes, stress coming from this area can have a major impact in other areas.
 
3. Environment Related Stress
Environment related stress is where the normal daily routine of a person is bombarded by disturbances and changes that the person cannot cope with. Disturbances include noise from the surroundings (i.e. jackhammer in a nearby construction site, traffic noise, etc.), and weather disturbances among others. Changes in the environment such as moving to a new state, having a new job or having a completely different lifestyle are stressors too.
 
Critical incident stress (CIS) is the emotional stress that individuals experience after being exposed to a specific incident that is perceived as traumatic. It is very common and normal for people to experience a range of reactions to critical incidents which may be cognitive, physical, behavioural or emotional in nature (Carlier, Voerman & Gersons, 2000). Different people have different reactions. Some people have limited reactions that last only a few days while others may take weeks or months to feel comfortable again. Others can even have a delayed onset reaction too. There are also some reactions that suggest a person is having difficulty coping with the incident.
 
4. Psychological Stress
Psychological stress can include fear of an individual which can either be real or be a phobia which is not grounded in reality. Sleeplessness, anxieties and worries are sometimes caused by unrealistic fears which have no basis. The subconscious of a person and/or his/her belief systems, cultural background and social activity can all contribute to a socio-psychological stress complex.
 
5. Financial Stress
Feelings of helplessness in financial terms are one of the most common causes of stress, and because the economic well-being of an individual is connected to other areas of his/her life, a financial problem can also have spill over effects in areas such as relationship and health.
 
6. Health Related Stress
The health of a person is the wellspring of his life. Health related stress ranges from sleeplessness to drug abuse. Illnesses are also sources of stress. Some of the most common illnesses can be the most major stressors – such as influenza, asthma or psoriasis.
 
These categories are not isolated from each other. Mostly, one stressor can lead to other forms of stress. The categories can mix and match to create more stress and pressures can creep in from an area of one’s life to another. Above all this, the degree of stress can be mild to extreme. A suffering from stress in one area could not possibly isolate this area from infecting and inflicting damage to other areas of life.
 
The Fight or Flight Response
 
The fight or flight response is a primitive inbuilt response to stress or threat. Also referred to as hyperarousal or an acute stress response, it occurs in both animals and humans, enabling us to deal with threatening situations by preparing us for action. This is very useful if attacked because our bodies will be highly alert and strong, allowing us to either stay and fight the enemy or flee as fast as we can.
 
When the fight or flight response occurs, the sympathetic nervous system goes into action, releasing the hormone adrenalin into the bloodstream. This causes the heart to beat faster to deliver oxygen to the muscles, which become tense and ready for action. Breathing becomes more rapid and shallow, increasing oxygen supply to the blood.
 
The digestive system slows down to divert energy to the muscles and in more extreme hyperaroused states the body may even discharge the content of bladder and bowls to further prepare the organism for intense fighting or fleeing. Sweating also increases to keep the muscles cool for when they begin to work hard. In this way, the organism enters a state of increased alertness, vigilance and a preparedness for some form of physical action involving either fighting the threat or fleeing from the threat.
 
The fight or flight response evolved in prehistoric times when survival relied on both aggressive, combative behaviour and flight from a predator. In modern times, this response has remained with us and has been recognised as the first stage of the general adaptation syndrome that regulates stress responses among vertebrates and other organisms (Andrews, Crino, Hunt, Lampe, & Page, 1996).
 
The Fight or Flight Response:
  • The brain becomes aware of danger.
  • Hormones are released and the involuntary nervous system sends signals to various parts of the body to produce the following changes:
    • The mind becomes alert
    • Blood clotting ability increases, preparing for possible injury
    • Heart rate speeds up and blood pressure rises
    • Sweating increases to help cool the body
    • Blood is diverted to the muscles, which tense ready for action
    • Digestion slows down
    • Saliva production decreases, causing a dry mouth
    • Breathing rate speeds up, nostrils and air passages open wider to allow more air in quickly
    • Liver releases sugar to provide quick energy
    • Sphincter muscles contract to close the openings of the bowel and bladder
    • Immune responses decrease to allow for a massive response to immediate threat.
The General Adaptation Syndrome
 
General adaptation syndrome describes the body's short-term and long-term reaction to stress. Originally described by Hans De Solye in the 1920s, the general adaptation syndrome describes a three stage reaction to stress covering our initial reaction to the stressor, our resistance and adaptation to coping with the stressor and our eventual exhaustion after dealing with the stress whereby in normal circumstances we will recover from that exhaustion and live to deal with stressors another day. 
 
Alarm reaction phase
During the alarm reaction phase, a stressor disturbs homeostasis. Homeostasis is a point of balance or internal biological equilibrium. The brain subconsciously perceives the stressor and prepares the body either to fight or to run away (the “fight or flight” response).
 
When the mind perceives a stressor, the cerebral cortex, is called to attention. If the cerebral cortex consciously or unconsciously perceives a threat, it triggers an autonomic nervous system response that prepares the body for action. The autonomic nervous system is the portion of the central nervous system that regulates bodily functions that we do not normally consciously control. When we are stressed, the rate of all these bodily functions increases dramatically to give us the physical strength to protect ourselves against an attack, or to mobilize internal forces.
 
In addition to this, the hypothalamus, a section of the brain, functions as the control centre and determines the overall reaction to stressors. When the hypothalamus perceives that extra energy is needed to fight a stressor, it stimulates the adrenal glands to release the hormone epinephrine, also called adrenaline. Epinephrine causes more blood to be pumped with each beat of the heart, dilates the air sacs in the lungs to increase oxygen intake, increases the breathing rate, stimulates the liver to release more glucose, and dilates the pupils to improve visual sensitivity. The body is then poised to act immediately.
 
Other physical responses to stress during this stage include “butterflies” in the stomach, an elevation in blood pressure, dry mouth and tensing of muscles. In some instances if too intense or if for too long the individual may find it difficult to concentrate on preparing well to deal with the stress properly. The alarm reaction directs resources away from the digestive and immune systems to more immediate muscular and emotional needs. In normal circumstances the alarm reaction phase will not last for very long, in some instances it may only be for a few seconds, in other instances longer. The alarm reaction phase is only meant to be a preliminary phase of activating the body and mind into dealing effectively with the presenting stressor or threat.
 
Resistance (adaptation) phase
As we move from the initial alarm reaction phase, as a preparatory response to the presenting stressor, we then move onto the resistance or adaptation phase. It is in this phase where the body is now actively dealing with the stressor. If this adaptation phase continues for a prolonged period of time without periods of relaxation and rest to counterbalance the stress response and allow time for the body to replenish and repair from the exertion required to execute the appropriate stress response, sufferers become prone to fatigue, concentration lapses, irritability and lethargy as the effort to sustain arousal slides into negative stress.
 
At the most fundamental level of response the organism is going to be either fighting or fleeing in some way, in an attempt to resist the negatively perceived consequences of the threatening stressor. This resistance may be required for either, a few moments, days, months and sometimes even years. The form of resistance employed will have varying degrees of success depending on how well it is employed and how relevant it is in dealing with the stressor situation. Regardless of the length of time, once the threatening stressor has been dealt with effectively the organism is able to return to its pre-activated state and recover from the ordeal. It is in the process of recovery that adaptation occurs.
 
Every organism has restricted resources to adapt to stressors. Therefore, whenever someone has to adapt to a stressor they will lose “adaptation energy” meaning that they will have less resources to adapt next time they are confronted with a stressor unless they adapt successfully.
 
Successful adaptation from resistance is when the body and mind adapts to a point of being more capable in its capacity to resist if ever confronted by the stressor again. In this sense, successful adaptation means the organism has increased its biopsychosocial level of fitness whereby it can take on the same threat more effectively next time or successfully take on a bigger threat next time.
 
It is through this process of adaptation that we learn how to cope better and deal with things more effectively. At a physiological level successful adaptation actually means getting physically fitter. Psychosocially it means having greater levels of resilience, working better coping strategies and having more appropriate emotions and thought processes around the challenging situation. 
 
Problems occur at the resistance/adaptation phase if the combined biological, psychological and social responses employed do not deal with the threat effectively or if the threat is chronic whereby it eventually wears down the capacity of the organism to resist the threat or deal with it properly. This problem leads us to the exhaustion phase of the general adaptation syndrome.
 
Exhaustion phase
A person can only fight or flee for so long before they begin to wear down in their capacity to resist and deal with it. If the stressor environment is chronic and excessive without any real opportunity to recover or adapt successfully, the organism will begin to show signs of adaptation failure. Systems begin to break down and we become more susceptible to a range of biopsychosocial symptoms. If we persist in functioning at this level, death can occur.
 
References:
 
Andrews, G., Crino R., Hunt, C., Lampe, L., & Page, A. (1996). The treatment of anxiety disorders. New York: Cambridge University Press.
 
Did you enjoy this article? Then share the feeling and forward it to a friend! Quick reminder: Please send this eZine to all your family and friends so they too can enjoy the benefits. Thank you.
 
Join our community:
 
 
Help those around you suffering mental illness in silence: www.mhss.net.au/lz
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Intobookstore
The Institute has a list of recommended textbooks and DVDs which can add great value to your learning journey - and the good news is that you can purchase them very easily. The AIPC bookstore will give YOU:
  • Discounted prices!
  • Easy ordering method!
  • Quality guarantee!
This fortnight's feature is...
 
Name: Groups: A Counseling Specialty, 5th edition
Authors: Gladding, Samuel
AIPC Code: GLADDING
AIPC Price: $94.46 (RRP $104.95)
ISBN: 978-013-173-5958
 
This book examines essential skills required to be an effective worker with groups in multiple settings.
 
To order this book, simply contact your nearest Student Support Centre or the AIPC Head Office (1800 657 667).
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Intoarticles
 
Different Modes of Clinical Supervision
 
In the context of ongoing professional development after original training, clinical supervision is a key factor in aiding psychotherapists to function in complex work environments (Lambie & Sias, 2009). Supervision is a process that allows ongoing observation and intervention to a supervisee while they are putting into practice skills they have learned.
 
It is the process of supervision that promotes; the supervisee’s development, the refinement of the supervisee’s counselling skills, the monitoring and enhancing of the therapeutic relationship and the client’s welfare (Tromski-Klingshirn & Davis, 2007).
 
Clinical supervision has been defined as “an intervention provided by a more senior member of a profession to a junior member or members of the same profession. The purpose is to enhance the professional functioning of the more junior professionals (Getz, 1999). In this article, we explore a range of different modes of supervision.
 
Click here to continue reading this article...
 
 
Counsellors vs Workplace Harassment
 
To effectively counsel a client who has been the target of workplace harassment it is helpful to have an understanding of relevant legislation. The following is an extract from the Queensland Government Department of Employment and Industrial Relations (it is recommended that counsellors from other states and territories check their relevant legislation).
 
The QLD Dept of Employment and Industrial Relations, defines workplace harassment as follows:
 
Click here to continue reading this article...
 
Other articles: www.aipc.net.au/articles
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Intodevelopment
 
Convenient Professional Development
 
Hundreds of counsellors, psychologists, social workers, mental health nurses and allied health professionals already access over 100 Hours of Professional Development online, for less than $1 a day. Now it's your turn.
 
Mental Health Academy (MHA) is the leading provider of professional development education for the mental health industry. MHA provides the largest variety of courses and videos workshops, all conveniently delivered via the internet.
 
With MHA, you no longer have to worry about high costs, proximity and availability, or fitting a workshop around your lifestyle!
 
You can access the huge range of PD, including courses and video workshops, whenever and from wherever you want.
 
Whether you are looking for courses on anxiety and depression, or a video workshop discussing the intricacies of relationship counselling - Mental Health Academy is your gateway to over 100 hours of professional development content.
 
Take a quick look at what Mental Health Academy offers:
  • Over 70 professionally developed courses.
  • On-demand, webstreamed video workshops.
  • Over 100 hours of professional development.
  • Extremely relevant topics.
  • New courses released every month.
  • Video supported training.
  • Online, 24/7 access to resources.
  • Endorsement by multiple Associations, including AASW, ACA and APS.
Begin your journey today. Click on the link below to register for a monthly or annual unlimited membership. As an unlimited member, you can access all MHA courses for less than $1 per day, and receive discounts when purchasing any video workshops:
 
 
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Intoconnection
Have you visited the new Counselling Connection Blog yet? There are over 500 interesting posts including case studies, profiles, success stories, videos and much more. Make sure you too get connected (and thank you for those who have already submitted comments and suggestions).
 
Help for the Helper (Book Review)
 
Burnout, compassion fatigue and vicarious trauma are risks that, as therapists, we are aware of however whilst many of us have a toolbox full of techniques to assist our clients, we often fall short in caring for ourselves. One of the most important tools in our arsenal is ourselves – the therapist as a person – and if we don’t take care of ourselves then the therapeutic alliance will not work. This is where a book such as Help the Helper by Babette Rothschild becomes such an invaluable resource.
 
Rothschild begins her book by promoting the use of common sense. Something that she believes is lacking in therapist training and professional development. And perhaps she is right. While therapists are taught many theories of human development and therapeutic technique, we should also be taught to trust in ourselves, our intuition and practice common sense. Rothschild looks at how we develop empathy with our clients and how these ‘ties that bind’ if left unchecked can quickly contribute to the aforementioned risks of burnout, compassion fatigue and vicarious trauma.
 
Click here to read the full post...
 
Get new Counselling Connection posts delivered by email! Simply visit our FeedBurner subscription page and click the link on the subscription box: https://feeds.feedburner.com/CounsellingConnection.
 
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Intotwitter
Follow us on Twitter and get the latest and greatest in counselling news. To follow, visit https://twitter.com/counsellingnews and click "Follow".
 
Featured Tweets
 
 
New at the AIPC Article Library » Six Anger Management Strategies for Clients: https://www.aipc.net.au/articles/?p=305
 
Have you visited the Australian Counselling Association's (ACA) new website yet? https://www.theaca.net.au/
 
How you can become friendlier, more caring, and less stressed by life: https://www.psychologytoday.com/articles/200611/altered-ego
 
AIPC Article Library » The Important Role of Mental Health Social Support: https://www.aipc.net.au/articles/?p=299
 
Attachment theory has emerged as a leading tool for understanding the deeper roots of dynamics in a close relationship: https://bit.ly/xgaZJT
 
Note that you need a Twitter profile to follow a list. If you do not have one yet, visit https://twitter.com to create a free profile today!
 
Tweet Count: 3205
Follower Count: 4300
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Intoquotes
"If you ask what is the single most important key to longevity, I would have to say it is avoiding worry, stress and tension. And if you didn't ask me, I'd still have to say it."
 
~ George F. Burns
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Intoseminars
Many students of the Diploma of Counselling attend seminars to complete the practical requirements of their course. Seminars provide an ideal opportunity to network with other students and liaise with qualified counselling professionals in conjunction with completing compulsory coursework.
 
Below are the seminars dates for the first semester of 2012. To register for a seminar, please contact your Student Support Centre.
 
To access the full list of 2012 seminars, visit: www.aipc.net.au/timetables.php.
 
BRISBANE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 26/05
Communication Skills II - 21/04, 23/06
The Counselling Process - 28/04
Counselling Therapies I - 24-25/03, 16-17/06
Counselling Therapies II - 14-15/04
Case Management - 14-15/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 09/06
Counselling Applications - 10/03
 
CDA Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 26/05
Communication Skills II - 21/04, 23/06
The Counselling Process - 28/04
Counselling Therapies I - 24-25/03, 16-17/06
Counselling Therapies II - 14-15/04
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 12/05
Family Therapy - 02/06
Case Management - 14-15/06
 
GOLD COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 19/05
Communication Skills II - 17/03, 16/06
The Counselling Process - 21/04
Counselling Therapies I - 23-24/03
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/05
Case Management - 30-31/03
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 21/04
Communication Skills I - 19/05
Communication Skills II - 17/03, 16/06
Counselling Therapies I - 23-24/03
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 20/4
Family Therapy - 15/06
Case Management - 30-31/03
 
MELBOURNE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 14/04, 06/05, 03/06
Communication Skills II - 15/04, 12/05, 09/06
The Counselling Process - 01/04, 05/05, 02/06
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/03, 21-22/04, 19-20/05, 16-17/06
Counselling Therapies II - 24-25/03, 28-29/04, 26-27/05, 23-24/06
Case Management - 31/03-01/04, 30/06-01/07
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 13/05
Counselling Applications - 14/04
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 01/04, 05/05, 02/06
Communication Skills I - 07/05, 05/02, 03/03, 14/04, 06/05, 03/06
Communication Skills II - 15/04, 12/05, 09/06
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/03, 21-22/04, 19-20/05, 16-17/06
Counselling Therapies II - 24-25/03, 28-29/04, 26-27/05, 23-24/06
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 13/05
Family Therapy - 10/06
Case Management - 31/03-01/04, 30/06-01/07
 
NORTHERN TERRITORY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 14/04
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/03
Counselling Therapies II - 28/04, 05/05
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 10/03, 09/06
Counselling Applications - 12/05
 
CDA Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 14/04
Communication Skills II - 23/07
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/03
Counselling Therapies II - 28/04, 05/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 16/06
Family Therapy - 21/04, 15/09
 
SOUTH AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 24/03, 19/05
Communication Skills II - 25/03, 20/05
The Counselling Process - 01/04, 02/06
Counselling Therapies I - 28-29/04
Counselling Therapies II - 23-24/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 05/05
Counselling Applications - 16/06
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 01/04, 02/06
Communication Skills I - 24/03, 19/05
Communication Skills II - 25/03, 20/05
Counselling Therapies I - 28-29/04
Counselling Therapies II - 23-24/06
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 06/05
Family Therapy - 17/06
 
SUNSHINE COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 19/05
Communication Skills II - 20/05
The Counselling Process - 31/03, 30/06
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/03
Counselling Therapies II - 26-27/05
Case Management - 23-24/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 28/04
Counselling Applications - 14/07
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 31/03, 30/06
Communication Skills I - 19/05
Communication Skills II - 20/05
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/03
Counselling Therapies II - 26-27/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 14/04
Family Therapy - 02/06
Case Management - 23-24/06
 
SYDNEY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 27/03, 28/04, 05/06
Communication Skills II - 28/03, 05/05, 18/06
The Counselling Process - 26/03, 21/04, 12/05, 04/06, 21/06
Counselling Therapies I - 23-24/04, 15-16/06
Counselling Therapies II - 29-30/03, 17-18/05, 29-30/06
Case Management - 02-03/04, 22-23/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 07/05
Counselling Applications - 08/05
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 26/03, 21/04, 12/05, 04/06, 21/06
Communication Skills I - 27/03, 28/04, 05/06
Communication Skills II - 28/03, 05/05, 18/06
Counselling Therapies I - 23-24/04, 15-16/06
Counselling Therapies II - 29-30/03, 17-18/05, 29-30/06
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 24/03, 26/05
Family Therapy - 31/03, 01/06
Case Management - 02-03/04, 22-23/06
 
TASMANIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 25/03, 24/06
Communication Skills II - 06/05
The Counselling Process - 20/05
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/03
Counselling Therapies II - 29-30/04
Case Management - 14-15/04
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 17/06
Counselling Applications - 01/04
 
CDA Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 25/03, 24/06
Communication Skills II - 06/05
The Counselling Process - 20/05
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/03
Counselling Therapies II - 29-30/04
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 27/05
Family Therapy - 11/03
Case Management - 14-15/04
 
WESTERN AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 10/03, 28/04, 26/05, 07/06
Communication Skills II - 11/03, 29/04, 27/05
The Counselling Process - 17/03, 14/04, 12/05
Counselling Therapies I - 21-22/04, 09-10/06
Counselling Therapies II - 05-06/05
Case Management - 19-20/05
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 16/06
Counselling Applications - 18/03
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 17/03, 14/04, 12/05
Communication Skills I - 10/03, 28/04, 26/05, 07/06
Communication Skills II - 11/03, 29/04, 27/05
Counselling Therapies I - 21-22/04, 09-10/06
Counselling Therapies II - 05-06/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 02/06
Case Management - 19-20/05
 
Important Note: Advertising of the dates above does not guarantee availability of places in the seminar. Please check availability with the respective Student Support Centre.
 
 
 
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