AIPC Institute InBrief
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In this Issue

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bullet Hello!
bullet Intothediploma
bullet Intocounselling
bullet Intoqualifications
bullet Intobookstore
bullet Intoarticles
bullet Intodevelopment
bullet Intoconnection
bullet Intotwitter
bullet Intoquotes
bullet Intoseminars
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Editor: Sandra Poletto
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Copyright: 2012 Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors

Hello!
Welcome to Edition 142 of Institute Inbrief. In this edition’s featured article we define impulsive and planned suicide, and explore how counsellors can effectively respond to suicide risk.
 
Also in this edition:
 
-      Previously Published Articles
-      Professional Development news
-      Blog and Twitter updates
-      Upcoming seminar dates
 
If you would like to access daily articles & resources, and interact with over 3700 peers, make sure you join our Facebook community today: www.facebook.com/counsellors. It is a great way to stay in touch and share your knowledge in counselling.
 
Enjoy your reading,
 
Editor.
 
 
Join our community:
 
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Intothediploma
 
AIPC is Determined to Make Counselling an Attainable Career for You,
Just Like Over 55,000 Other Students in the Past 20 Years!
 
We have helped over 55,000 people from 27 countries pursue their dream of assisting others with a recognised Counselling qualification.
 
It's been a wonderful journey over the last 20 years (the Institute was first established in 1990). And it's been a pleasure to assist so many people realise their counselling aspirations in that time.
 
Why are so many people delighted with their studies? Our research over the years highlights three keys points...
 
1.     Our courses and personnel have just ONE specific focus... Excellence in Counselling Education. We live and breathe counselling education! Nothing else gets in the way.
 
2.     Exceptional value in your education investment. Our courses are always (always) much less than other providers that deliver counselling education. Our unique focus on counselling education, the large number of students undertaking our programs, and the creative way we deliver our courses provide us with cost savings that we pass on to you.
 
3.     The flexibility to study where, when and how you want to. You can study Externally, In-Class, On-Line or any combination. And you can undertake your studies at a pace that suits you... 12 to 18 months or over 2, 3 even 4 years or more. You decide because you are in charge.
 
We understand that no two people have the same circumstances. You no doubt have issues affecting your life that are unique to you and affect the speed and manner you'd like to study. You may be working full or part-time, undertaking other studies, or may not have studied for a long time.
 
Let's face it, life is not predictable and in today's fast paced society it's important that your education is flexible enough to fit in with your other obligations. AIPC provides you with flexible course delivery modes so YOU set the rules for how and when you learn.
 
Want to find out more? Visit www.aipc.net.au/lz today!
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Intocounselling
 
Responding to Suicide Risk
 
Suicide is a serious health problem. The World Health Organisation estimates that one suicide attempt occurs every three seconds and one completed suicide occurs approximately every 40 seconds resulting in almost one million people dying from suicide each year; a "global" mortality rate of 16 per 100,000 (WHO, 2000, 2010).
 
In the last 45 years suicide rates have increased by 60% worldwide. Each day, approximately 210 Australians attempt to end their life and each year over 2500 will commit suicide. Suicide in Australia kills 8.5 times more people than homicides and 1.5 times more than motor vehicle accidents. Consequently, reducing suicide has become an important international health goal.
 
Suicide Definition
 
Suicide is considered to be an attempt to ‘communicate’ or to ‘solve a problem’. When a client is communicating a need, the counsellor’s perspective is to seek to clarify what, and to whom, the act of suicide will communicate. When a client is trying to solve a problem through suicide, the counsellor’s aim is to clarify what problem or problems the client is aiming to solve and then committing with the client to finding more effective ways to address such problems.
 
Suicidal behaviours include suicide, attempted suicide and suicidal ideation.
 
-      Suicide is any self-injurious act intended to end one’s life which results in death. It is defined as death by self-inflicted, intentional injury.
 
-      Attempted suicide is any potentially self-injurious act intended to end one’s life but does not result in death.
 
-      Suicidal ideation is thinking about engaging in suicidal behaviour, with or without a specific suicide plan.
 
Categories of Suicide
 
Individuals contemplating suicide usually fall within two categories. These are impulsive and planned suicide. Both categories should be taken seriously and responded to appropriately because each type places the person at risk. While there are numerous variables to consider when responding to suicide risk, one variable that will influence the type of response is whether the suicide risk is impulsive or planned. 
 
Impulsive Suicide: Impulsive suicide relates to the impulsive thoughts of suicide that may occur as a response to a crisis or trauma. In a state of crisis, individuals can lose the capacity to rationally control their thinking, behaviour and emotions. In the context of potentially irrational and uncontrolled responses to trauma, it is important to remember that it is not necessarily the crisis or trauma itself that pushes the client into such impulsive thoughts of suicide. It is more to do with the perception they have of the trauma and the meaning or significance they place on it. 
 
In the context of impulsive suicide there is usually no history of self-harming thoughts or behaviour. Situations which cause pain, despair and distress can range from, for example, catastrophic events like a plane crash or earthquakes, to individual experiences like being assaulted, a relationship break-up or death of a loved one.
 
Conventional counselling techniques that focus on discussing the situation and problem solving can at times deepen the state of crisis. Thus a crisis management approach to assist the client in dealing with the here and now can provide clinicians with strategies to stabilize the client and reduce the risk of self-harm. Once crisis management has been achieved, future counselling sessions can then include more in depth discussions of the situation (Pelling, Bowers and Armstrong, 2007).
 
Planned Suicide: In the case of planned suicide, the individual is not in a state of crisis (or is in a mild state of crisis) and therefore, their interactions with others and their behaviours can appear to be calm. The individual is focused and their thought processes around the notion of suicide, rom their perspective, are rational. They will usually appear to be in control of themselves, but will also usually appear unhappy. After considering all options available to them, they will come to the conclusion that ending their life seems the best option. The individual is committed to solving the problem, even if this requires them to suicide. 
 
Individuals who do not seek counselling are not ambivalent about suicide. Therefore, counsellors will usually not be visited by individuals who are not ambivalent about committing suicide. Those who do seek assistance from a counsellor about thoughts of suicide will often be ambivalent about it, whereby their planning and level of conviction may not be completely settled or decided. In this context, rather than wanting to die, the individuals are more likely to not want to live as they currently do. It is in the context of this ambivalence where the clinician can arrest the act while seeking alterative options.
 
Responding to Suicide Risk
 
Individuals who have experienced a traumatic event can show their stress and distress emotionally, cognitively, behaviourally and/or physiologically. Counsellors may notice the following types of reactions and common symptoms to identify when a person is in a state of crisis:
 
-      Emotional reaction: anxiety, fear, panic attacks, guilt, hopelessness, grief, anger, frustration, numbness, shock.
 
-      Cognitive reaction: Confusion, poor concentration & attention, flashbacks, nightmares, disorientation of place and time, obsessive thinking about the event, difficultly remembering the event, preoccupation of it happening, inability to understand one’s reaction.
 
-      Behavioural reaction: Withdrawal, fatigue, apathy, sleep disturbances, black humour, work absenteeism, increased use of drug and alcohol, angry outbursts, irritability, crying, antisocial acts, unresponsiveness, hysteria. 
 
-      Physiological reaction: Dizziness, sweating, trembling, nausea, diarrhoea, loss of appetite, pain, heightened sensitivity to sound.
 
(Pelling et al., 2007)
 
A Six-Step Model of Response to Impulsive Suicide
 
The aim of this model is to restore the client to a stable state of being that abates the impulse to suicide. It does not aim to explore and solve issues. The Six-Step Model of Crisis Intervention ideally should be used in a general flow, rather than six separate stages.
 
The first three steps are considered to be the ‘listening’ steps and the last three steps are described as ‘acting’ steps. Once the counsellor has gained a sound overall understanding of the client’s current position, the ‘acting’ steps are used to develop short term goals that the client can commit to and can also play a part in assisting the client to feel safe. Steps 4 to 6 may need to be revisited, until both the client and counsellor are satisfied with the outcome.
 
Step 1: Define the problem
 
-      Acquire an understanding of the traumatic event and how the individual perceives the event
-      Identify the current and longer term problems the individual is having
-      Acknowledge what has happened to the individual and why they are seeking assistance
 
Step 2: Ensure client safety
 
-      Assess risk of self-harm and harm to others
-      Short term focus of reducing impulsive actions (later to be followed up with a long term suicide risk assessment)
 
Step 3: Provide Support
 
-      Communicate a sense of stability and calmness
-      Overtly and actively offer your support
-      Assist to identify other people in the individual’s life who can offer support.
 
Step 4: Examine alternatives
 
-      Assist the client to develop realistic options on issues which they can change to help develop a sense of control over their life
 
Step 5: Making Plans
 
-      Develop a plan of action, taking into consideration what the client is able to cope with, is willing to do and the resources available.
-      The focus must be on the client choosing the options for themselves rather than it being prescribed to them
 
Step 6: Obtaining commitment
 
-      Develop joint commitment to following through with the plan
-      Include clear guidelines of the responsibilities belonging to the client and counsellor and ensure follow-up.
 
Asking four key questions
 
When responding to an impulsive suicide risk, there are four key questions counsellors need to consider. The following table provides these questions with a guide to how and when to consider them in relation to The Six-Step Model of Crisis Intervention:
 
The Four Key
Orientating Questions
Applying the Questions to
The Six-Step Model of Response
Question 1
Is this person in a crisis state?
Assess: Make an assessment of the client’s state of being using rating scales such as the Triage Assessment System.
 
If your answer is ‘No’, choose another intervention strategy such as counselling.
If your answer is ‘Yes’ choose the crisis intervention strategy.
 
Question 2
Why is this person in a crisis state?
Step 1: Define the problem
Understand: Try to grasp what has happened to this client and meaning the client is attaching to the event. Make sense of the client: do not expect the client to make sense.
Question 3
What does this person need from me right now?
Step 2: Check Safety
Step 3: Provide Support
Determine: A client in a crisis state always needs to have safety and support addressed but you need to determine just how assertively you need to provide this, with what level of structure and support.
Question 4
What is an immediate pressing problem that needs to be addressed?
Step 4: Generate alternatives
Step 5: Select and formulate a plan
Step 6: Check commitment
Intervene: What immediate problem can be addressed right now that will engage the client in making choices and taking action on the way to restoring stability and mobility?
 
(Pelling et al., 2007)
 
Responding To Planned Suicide
 
Presenting perspectives such as reasons not to suicide, clarifying their responsibilities to uphold when living and proposing any moral or religious perspectives to a client is not considered to be overly beneficial. These strategies have shown to actually encourage the act. The best strategy to assist a client contemplating a planned suicide is by following these three steps:
 
Step 1: Address the client’s needs
 
-      Assess the situation, the client and the risk that is present
-      Commit to finding alternative solutions to what the client hopes the suicide will achieve
-      Focus on short-term achievable goals
-      Use strategies which give time to work on alternative options
 
Step 2: Reduce Lethality
 
-      The higher the level of risk the more quickly, directly and assertively the counsellor needs to ensure client safety
-      Negotiate the removal of items which might be used to harm the individual
-      Identify a safe environment where the individual will not be alone and will be supported. This may require negotiating with the client to tell other people of their risk
-      Seek commitment from the individual not to harm themselves for a period of time. This may include a ‘no suicide’ contract. The agreement should include that within this time alternative solutions wills be explored.
-      Identify any medical or mental health issue, and assist the individual to obtain treatment.
-      Anticipate any triggers which may influence the individual’s ability to abstain from suicide and make contingency plans.
 
Step 3: Look after Yourself as the Counsellor
 
Regardless of how experienced a counsellor is, they should never work in isolation with a suicidal client. Discussing their observations and actions with peers and a supervisor assists the counsellor on both a personal and professional level while also ensuring support if the client does act out their intentions.
 
Note: If the therapist’s assessment of the situation is that the client’s suicide is imminent, this justifies breaking confidentiality. This may include declaring your concerns to relatives or friends of the client and alerting the police. Breaking confidentiality in this position is the best option to keep the individual safe from self-harm.
 
Responding to people who are from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds
 
Challenges resettling into a foreign culture including language difficulties, little access to meaningful work, and experiencing trans-generational conflict, may place migrants at a particular risk of suicide and self-harm. Migrants may have experienced torture and trauma prior to their settlement in their new country which may increase their risk to mental health issues and suicide. When dealing with such populations, it is important to note that:
 
-      Responses to suicide risk in culturally diverse communities should be developed in collaboration with multicultural organizations to ascertain the issues that may exacerbate their risk to suicide. 
-      Interpreters should be available whenever necessary to overcome the language barrier
-      Professionals should become aware and familiar with culturally appropriate methods and protocols when working with such individuals.
-      Professionals should be aware of the different ways individuals may choose to deal with and respond to suicide.
 
References:
 
-      Pelling, N., Bowers, R., & Armstrong, P. (2007). The practice of counselling. Sydney: Thomson.
 
-      World Health Organisation (2000). Preventing Suicide. A resource for prison officers. Mental and Behavioural Disorders. Department of Mental Health.
 
 
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Intoqualifications
 
Learn How You Can Gain Specialty Expertise and a Graduate Qualification with a Vocational Graduate Certificate or Vocational Graduate Diploma in Counselling...
 
...In Only 6 to 12 Months
 
More and more Counsellors are gaining advanced specialist skills with a Vocational Graduate qualification. Vocational Graduate qualifications provide a higher level, vocational alternative to traditional Post Graduate courses offered by Universities.
 
It's time and cost effective, meaning you can gain a formal graduate qualification in 6 to 12 months in your specialist area. Here's how a graduate qualification can advance your career:
 
-      Develop a deeper understanding of your area of interest and achieve more optimal outcomes with your clients.
-      A graduate qualification will assist you move up the corporate ladder from practitioner to manager/ supervisor.
-      Make the shift from being a generalist practitioner to a specialist.
-      Gain greater professional recognition from your peers.
-      Increase client referrals from allied health professionals.
-      Maximise job opportunities in your preferred specialty area.
-      Formalise years of specialist experience with a respected qualification.
 
Save Over $6,000 (67% Discount to Market)
 
A Vocational Graduate Diploma at a university costs between $10,000 and $38,000. BUT, you don’t have to pay these exorbitant amounts for an equally high quality qualification. You can do your qualification with the Institute and save a massive $6,000+ on the cost of doing a similar course at university.
 
To learn more, please visit www.aipc.net.au/vgd. Alternatively, call your nearest Institute branch on the FreeCall numbers shown below.
 
Sydney: 1800 677 697
Melbourne: 1800 622 489
Perth: 1800 353 643
Brisbane: 1800 246 324
Adelaide: 1800 246 381
Regional NSW: 1800 625 329
Regional QLD: 1800 359 565
Gold Coast: 1800 625 359
NT/Tasmania: 1800 353 643
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Intobookstore
The Institute has a list of recommended textbooks and DVDs which can add great value to your learning journey - and the good news is that you can purchase them very easily. The AIPC bookstore will give YOU:
 
-      Discounted prices!
-      Easy ordering method!
-      Quality guarantee!
 
This fortnight's feature is...
 
Name: Stress: Myth, Theory and Research
Author: Jones, F. & Bright, M.
AIPC Code: JONES
AIPC Price: $44.95 (RRP $49.95)
ISBN: 978-013-041-1891
 
This book attempts a clear overview of our current understanding of stress. It highlights some of the popular misconceptions about stress, providing a valuable resource in terms of suggestions for further reading and the guidance it provides through a developing and complex field.
 
To order this book, simply contact your nearest Student Support Centre or the AIPC Head Office (1800 657 667).
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Intoarticles
 
Group Therapeutic Factors for Change
 
It is important to recognise that the success of individual group members is intimately linked to the group as a whole. Effective group therapy can help clients enhance self responsibility, increase readiness for change and establish authentic support for recovery and change. There are a number of therapeutic factors that influence the efficacy of group therapy. Yalom and Leszcz (2005) have categorised a number of factors. They are listed below:
 
-      Installation of hope
-      Universality
-      Imparting of information
-      Altruism
-      The corrective recapitulation of the primary family group
-      Development of socialising techniques
-      Imitative Behaviour
-      Group Cohesiveness
-      Catharsis
-      Existential Factors
 
Each of the factors listed above are explained in more detail below.
 
Click here to continue reading this article...
 
 
A Case Outlining How to Focus on Solutions
 
Michelle has come to counselling due to increasing feelings of hopelessness about the direction of her life. She is complaining that she is too “bogged down” in her problems to see where she should be going. This is Michelle’s second session with the Counsellor.
 
She has spent her previous session discussing the areas of her life that she is unhappy with. Within this session, the Counsellor decides to trial a solution-focussed approach with Michelle. The Counsellor hopes to move Michelle onto discussing ways she can overcome the problems that she has described by focussing more on solutions rather than problem descriptions.
 
For ease of writing, the Professional Counsellor is abbreviated to “C”.
 
Click here to continue reading this article...
 
Other articles: www.aipc.net.au/articles
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Intodevelopment
 
Convenient Professional Development
 
Hundreds of counsellors, psychologists, social workers, mental health nurses and allied health professionals already access over 100 Hours of Professional Development online, for less than $1 a day. Now it's your turn.
 
Mental Health Academy (MHA) is the leading provider of professional development education for the mental health industry. MHA provides the largest variety of courses and videos workshops, all conveniently delivered via the internet.
 
With MHA, you no longer have to worry about high costs, proximity and availability, or fitting a workshop around your lifestyle!
 
You can access the huge range of PD, including courses and video workshops, whenever and from wherever you want.
 
Whether you are looking for courses on anxiety and depression, or a video workshop discussing the intricacies of relationship counselling - Mental Health Academy is your gateway to over 100 hours of professional development content.
 
Take a quick look at what Mental Health Academy offers:
 
-      Over 70 professionally developed courses.
-      On-demand, webstreamed video workshops.
-      Over 100 hours of professional development.
-      Extremely relevant topics.
-      New courses released every month.
-      Video supported training.
-      Online, 24/7 access to resources.
-      Endorsement by multiple Associations, including AASW, ACA and APS.
 
Begin your journey today. Click on the link below to register for a monthly or annual unlimited membership. As an unlimited member, you can access all MHA courses for less than $1 per day, and receive discounts when purchasing any video workshops:
 
 
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Intoconnection
Have you visited Counselling Connection, the Institute's Blog yet? We continually publish new and interesting posts including case studies, profiles, success stories and much more. Make sure you too get connected (and thank you for those who have already submitted comments and suggestions).
 
Mental Health Links & Resources
 
Anxiety Recovery Centre
Information about anxiety disorders, their management and links.
 
Australian Centre for Grief and Bereavement
Grief and bereavement related information and resources, links to websites and low cost or free counselling services and a message board.
 
Carers Australia
The latest information, research, policies and services for people caring for someone with an illness or disability, including mental illness.
 
Reconnexion: Treating Panic, Anxiety, Depression and Tranquilliser Dependency
Information on anxiety and depression (including postnatal depression), related research and publications.
 
SANE Australia
Mental health-related information, tips, links and online help.
 
Black Dog Institute
Information on depression (including during and after pregnancy) and Bipolar Disorder – specifically looking at causes, treatments, symptoms, getting help and current research findings.
 
Better Health Channel
Health and medical information to help individuals and their communities improve their health and wellbeing.
 
The National Association for Loss and Grief
Information on counselling and support services, seminars, publications and links for people who are experiencing grief following the loss of someone close to them.
 
Click here to continue reading this post...
 
Blog Email: blog@aipc.net.au
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Intotwitter
Follow us on Twitter and get the latest and greatest in counselling news. To follow, visit https://twitter.com/counsellingnews and click "Follow".
 
Featured Tweets
 
As the counsellor, how would you proceed with this dilemma involving a separated couple? https://t.co/0chdM0G
 
How to Communicate Assertively in Your Relationship: https://t.co/Re95Vnl
 
Take a sneak peek into our Anti-Bullying Program - some prevention activities designed for Prep to Grade 3 students: https://t.co/B7f0df8
 
Protective factors that help women recover from childhood violence identified https://ow.ly/1dFNQ8
 
Leaving anger on the field: Statistics show that sports help ease aggression in boys https://ow.ly/1dF1Do
 
Inspirational stories from AIPC Graduates - watch now (video): https://t.co/aAiX4Dl
 
Vodcast: Issues with parents and evaluating anti-bullying work by Dr Ken Rigby: https://t.co/nlCavZ6
 
Note that you need a Twitter profile to follow a list. If you do not have one yet, visit https://twitter.com to create a free profile today!
 
Tweet Count: 2592
Follower Count: 3051
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Intoquotes
"The important thing is to strive towards a goal which is not immediately visible. That goal is not the concern of the mind, but of the spirit." 
 
~ Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
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Intoseminars
Many students of the Diploma of Counselling attend seminars to complete the practical requirements of their course. Seminars provide an ideal opportunity to network with other students and liaise with qualified counselling professionals in conjunction with completing compulsory coursework.
 
Below are upcoming seminars dates for period between July and December 2011. To register for a seminar, please contact your Student Support Centre.
 
To access the full list, visit: www.aipc.net.au/timetables.php.
 
Diploma of Counselling (CDA) Timetable
 
Northern Territory
The Counselling Process - 24/09, 04/12
Communication Skills I - 12/11
Communication Skills II - 20/08, 03/12
Counselling Therapies I - 16-17/07
Counselling Therapies II - 27-28/08
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 05/11
Family Therapy - 17/09
Case Management - 26-27/11
 
South Australia
The Counselling Process - 30/07, 24/09, 26/11
Communication Skills I - 06/08, 15/10, 03/12
Communication Skills II - 07/08, 16/10, 04/12
Counselling Therapies I - 13-14/08, 12-13/11
Counselling Therapies II - 27-28/08, 10-11/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks- 17/09
Family Therapy - 27/11
Case Management - 19-20/11
 
Sydney
The Counselling Process - 16/07, 01/08, 26/08, 10/09, 14/10, 31/10, 26/11, 12/12
Communication Skills I - 29/07, 27/08, 24/09, 21/10, 18/11, 14/12
Communication Skills II - 04/08, 02/09, 07/10, 30/11
Counselling Therapies I - 22-23/08, 27-28/10, 01-02/12
Counselling Therapies II - 27-28/07, 19-20/09, 14-15/11
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 18/07, 30/09, 21/11
Family Therapy - 13/10, 13/12
Case Management - 21-22/07, 22-23/09, 24-25/11
 
Western Australia
The Counselling Process - 16/07, 13/08, 10/09, 08/10, 05/11, 03/12
Communication Skills I - 06/08, 17/09, 29/10, 10/12
Communication Skills II - 07/08, 18/09, 30/10, 11/12
Counselling Therapies I - 03-04/09, 26-27/11
Counselling Therapies II - 23-24/07, 24-25/09, 17-18/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 09/10
Family Therapy - 14/08, 04/12
Case Management - 27-28/08, 12-13/11
 
Brisbane
The Counselling Process - 24/09, 27/11
Communication Skills I - 06/08, 22/10, 03/12
Communication Skills II - 03/09, 05/11
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/09
Counselling Therapies II - 29-30/10
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 27/08, 19/11
Family Therapy - 10/09, 17/12
Case Management - 12-13/11
 
Tasmania
The Counselling Process - 21/08, 27/11
Communication Skills I - 25/09, 18/12
Communication Skills II - 07/08, 06/11
Counselling Therapies I - 19-20/11
Counselling Therapies II - 03-04/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 04/09, 11/12
Family Therapy - 10/07, 16/10
Case Management - 13-14/08, 12-13/11
 
Melbourne
The Counselling Process - 30/07, 05/08, 24/09, 29/10, 19/11, 16/12
Communication Skills I - 31/07, 20/08, 10/09, 29/10, 12/11, 03/12
Communication Skills II - 21/08, 11/09, 30/10, 13/11, 20/11, 04/12
Counselling Therapies I - 27-28/08, 17-18/09, 15-16/10, 26-27/11, 10-11/12
Counselling Therapies II - 16-17/07, 20-21/08, 24-25/09, 22-23/10, 19-20/11, 17-18/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 13/08, 08/10
Family Therapy - 14/08, 09/10
Case Management - 23-24/07, 03-04/09, 05-06/11
 
Sunshine Coast
The Counselling Process - 17/09
Communication Skills I - 13/08, 29/10
Communication Skills II - 14/08, 30/10
Counselling Therapies I - 06-07/08
Counselling Therapies II - 24-25/09
Family Therapy - 20/08
Case Management - 05-06/11
 
Gold Coast
The Counselling Process - 23/07, 22/10, 03/12
Communication Skills I - 20/08, 05/11
Communication Skills II - 17/09, 17/12
Counselling Therapies I - 23-24/09
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/11
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 21/10
Case Management - 14-15/10
 
Diploma of Professional Counselling (DPCD) Timetable
 
Northern Territory
Communication Skills I - 12/11
Communication Skills II - 20/08, 03/12
The Counselling Process - 24/09, 04/12
Counselling Therapies I - 19-20/11
Counselling Therapies II - 10-11/12
Case Management - 26-27/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 08/10
Counselling Applications - 29/10
 
South Australia
Communication Skills I - 06/08, 15/10, 03/12
Communication Skills II - 07/08, 16/10, 04/12
The Counselling Process - 30/07, 24/09, 26/11
Counselling Therapies I - 13-14/08, 12-13/11
Counselling Therapies II - 27-28/08, 10-11/12
Case Management - 29-20/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 31/07
Counselling Applications - 27/03, 25/09
 
Sydney
Communication Skills I - 29/07, 27/08, 24/09, 21/10, 18/11, 14/12
Communication Skills II - 04/08, 02/09, 07/10, 30/11
The Counselling Process - 16/07, 01/08, 26/08, 10/09, 14/10, 31/10, 26/11, 12/12
Counselling Therapies I - 22-23/08, 27-28/10, 01-02/12
Counselling Therapies II - 27-28/07, 19-20/09, 14-15/11
Case Management - 21-22/07, 22-23/09, 24-25/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 16/09, 05/12
Counselling Applications - 17/10, 09/12
 
Western Australia
Communication Skills I - 06/08, 17/09, 29/10, 10/12
Communication Skills II - 07/08, 18/09, 30/10, 11/12
The Counselling Process - 16/07, 13/08, 10/09, 08/10, 05/11, 03/12
Counselling Therapies I - 03-04/09, 26-27/11
Counselling Therapies II - 23-24/07, 24-25/09, 17-18/12
Case Management - 27-28/08, 12-13/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 11/09
Counselling Applications - 17/07, 06/11
 
Brisbane
Communication Skills I - 06/08, 22/10, 03/12
Communication Skills II - 03/09, 05/11
The Counselling Process - 24/09, 27/11
Counselling Therapies I - 10-11/12
Counselling Therapies II - 23-24/07
Case Management - 12-13/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 15/10
Counselling Applications - 13/08, 18/12
 
Tasmania
Communication Skills I - 25/09, 18/12
Communication Skills II - 07/08, 06/11
The Counselling Process - 21/08, 27/11
Counselling Therapies I - 16-17/07
Counselling Therapies II - 27-28/08
Case Management - 13-14/08, 12-13/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 23/10
Counselling Applications - 31/07, 30/10
 
Melbourne
Communication Skills I - 31/07, 20/08, 10/09, 29/10, 12/11, 03/12
Communication Skills II - 21/08, 11/09, 30/10, 13/11, 20/11, 04/12
The Counselling Process - 30/07, 05/08, 24/09, 29/10, 19/11, 19/12, 16/12
Counselling Therapies I - 27-28/08, 17-18/09, 15-16/10, 26-27/11, 10-11/12
Counselling Therapies II - 16-17/07, 20-21/08, 24-25/09, 22-23/10, 19-20/11, 17-18/12
Case Management - 23-24/07, 03-04/09, 05-06/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 06/08, 01/10
Counselling Applications - 07/08, 02/10
 
Sunshine Coast
Communication Skills I - 13/08, 29/10
Communication Skills II - 14/08, 30/10
The Counselling Process - 17/09
Counselling Therapies I - 06-07/08
Counselling Therapies II - 24-25/09
Case Management - 05-06/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 27/08
Counselling Applications - 22/10
 
Gold Coast
 
Communication Skills I - 20/08, 05/11
Communication Skills II - 17/09, 17/12
The Counselling Process - 23/07, 22/10, 03/12
Counselling Therapies I - 23-24/09
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/11
Case Management - 14-15/10
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 05/08
Counselling Applications - 06/08
 
Important Note: Advertising of the dates above does not guarantee availability of places in the seminar. Please check availability with the respective Student Support Centre.
 
 
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