AIPC Institute InBrief
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In this Issue

in here
bullet Hello!
bullet Intothediploma
bullet Intostudies
bullet Intocounselling
bullet Intobookstore
bullet Intoarticles
bullet Intodevelopment
bullet Intoconnection
bullet Intotwitter
bullet Intoquotes
bullet Intoseminars
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Editor: Sandra Poletto
Email: ezine@aipc.net.au
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Copyright: 2012 Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors

Hello!
Welcome to Edition 130 of Institute Inbrief. In this edition we showcase part 3 of our series on group problem-solving strategies. This article explores potential problems that can arise from the intricate Performing Stage of group development.
 
Also in this edition:
 
-      Principles of Active Listening
-      Professional Development news
-      Blog and Twitter updates
-      Upcoming seminar dates
 
If you would like to access daily articles & resources, and interact with over 3000 peers, make sure you join our Facebook community today: www.facebook.com/counsellors. It is a great way to stay in touch and share your knowledge in counselling.
 
Finally, it’s our last edition for 2010! Thank you so much for your avid readership this year, and we would like to wish you and your loved ones a fantastic festive season. We will be back in January with even more articles, tips and news.
 
Enjoy your reading and a happy start to 2011,
 
Editor.
 
 
Join our community:
 
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Intothediploma
 
The Institute's Diploma of Counselling is an Industry Recognised Qualification, Allowing You to Practice as a Qualified Counsellor.
 
The nationally recognised Diploma of Counselling is recognised by the Australian Counselling Association (ACA), Australia's largest Member Association for Counsellors.
 
As part of its charter, ACA recognises courses that meet its training standards. These standards cover a broad range of areas, encompassing core organisational, staffing and educational competencies, as well as ensuring AIPC as a training body maintains an exceptionally high professional standard.
 
When you graduate, you are automatically eligible to become a Qualified Member of the Australian Counselling Association. You will be able to get professional indemnity insurance (preferred rates), and your qualification and Membership will be accepted and regarded in the industry.
 
And while you're studying with the Institute...
 
Simply put, AIPC sets the benchmark in education support. Even if you decide to study entirely at home or online, you'll never be alone in your studies. We have specialised in external education for over 19 years and have the most highly qualified, professional support team in the industry. Help is only ever a phone call or email away. Our enormous pool of educational resources means you have access to:
 
-      An Education team of over 65 degree qualified counselling professionals, all with extensive industry experience and teaching and assessing qualifications.
 
-      You'll have access 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to the online Knowledge Base that contains over 4,000 specific questions and answers relating to your course.
 
-      You'll have unlimited FREE access 9am to 5pm (EST) to the 1300 Study Assistance Line where you can discuss any study questions you may have with qualified team members.
 
-      You'll have unlimited email support. Send a question any time and have your enquiry replied to within 12 hours.
 
-      And you'll have the support of your local Student Support Centre who will link you into a local student support network (if you wish to stay in touch with other students); help you prepare for your practical assessments; co-ordinate your In-Class or tutorial activities; and set you up in a number of volunteer opportunities if you wish to practice your skills in the field.
 
Want to find out more? Visit www.aipc.net.au/lz.
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Intostudies
 
Become a Counsellor or Expand On Your Qualifications with Australia's
Most Cost Effective and Flexible Bachelor of Counselling
 
The Bachelor of Counselling is a careful blend of theory and practical application. Theory is learnt through user-friendly learning materials that have been carefully designed to make your studies as accessible and conducive to learning as possible.
 
The course and its subjects are structured to progressively develop your knowledge and skills from foundational, theoretical concepts through to more complex concepts and advanced skills and applications.
 
On completion, you will have...
 
-       The capacity to apply counselling theory and skills in an intentional and mindful manner.
 
-       The ability to evaluate and apply a variety of counselling models according to the needs of your client.
 
-       The ability to analyse counselling issues with consideration to broader social and cultural perspectives and will be equipped to make a natural transition into the role of Counsellor.
 
To register your interest for Semester 1 2011 – visit www.aipc.net.au/degree2011 or click to download a full course prospectus.
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Intocounselling
Group Problem-Solving Strategies, Part 3
 
Click here to read Part 1 of this series…
Click here to read Part 2 of this series...
 
Group work and team building are vital at the performing stage of group development. In psycho-educational groups, teamwork and learning are promoted by emphasising how groups can achieve tasks that cannot be accomplished by individuals alone (Gladding, 2003). Groups that work to achieve consensus, promote interpersonal relationships and minimise conflict perform best. Some of the common problems that are more likely to arise during this stage of group development include the following.
 
Racial and gender issues: Issues around race and gender can manifest in some groups more than others and can occur in both subtle and blatant ways. Individuals who hold stereotyped views and act in accordance with those views will behave in a rigid and stereotyped manner towards others thereby affecting the performance of the group. Group therapists must work with the group to prevent or limit negative outcomes among members with stereotypical views by increasing sensitivity and decreasing any escalation of conflict. 
 
Group collusion: Group collusion involves cooperating with others unconsciously or consciously to “reinforce prevailing attitudes, values, behaviours or norms” (Gladding, 2003). The purpose of such behaviour is self protection and to maintain the status quo of the group. Extreme group collusion may prevent open discussion, critical thinking and problem solving. To prevent group collusion from occurring to any great extent, group membership should be diversified, open discussion should be promoted, goals and purposes should be continuously clarified and interpersonal relationships should be strengthened (Gladding, 2003).
 
When groups are not doing well in the performing stage, several approaches can be employed to rectify the situation. These include:
 
1.     Modelling
2.     Exercises
3.     Group observing group
4.     Brainstorming
5.     Teaching skills
 
1. Modelling
 
Modelling can be used to teach group members complex behaviours in a relatively short time by copying or imitating. Group therapists can model appropriate behaviours; for example, self disclosure.
 
2. Exercises
 
Exercises refer to activities that the group does for a specific purpose. Working through an experiential exercise may help group members learn something specific that they can transfer to their lives outside the group. A common mistake that group therapists can make is planning an exercise for which members are not ready.
 
For example, during the second session of group therapy members are not particularly ready for an exercise that involves sharing about sexual concerns nor are they ready for certain kinds of feedback exercises. It is also important to note that too many exercises can prohibit members from having enough time to learn from the exercises. So timing of exercises and the number of exercises employed is important to monitor.
 
Exercises like ice breakers, warm ups, feedback and energisers can be used. The benefits of using group exercises include the following:
 
-       Creates a positive group atmosphere
-       Helps people to relax
-       Breaks down social barriers
-       Energizes & motivate
-       Helps people to "think outside the box"
-       Helps people to get to know one another
 
When conducting exercises, there are considerations that the group therapist should be aware of. These include:
 
-       Making sure members follow instructions
-       Allowing members not to share
-       Handling emotional reactions
-       Changing or stopping the exercise
-       Informing members of the time
-       Deciding whether the leader will participate
 
(Jacobs, Masson & Harvill, 2006).
 
3. Group Observing Group
 
This strategy requires the group to break up into two smaller groups whereby each observes the other functioning while the group therapist observes. After group observations, the group reunites to discuss and reflect on what was observed. The intent of this activity is to help members focus on common concerns that outweigh differences thus encouraging ongoing cohesion to common goals and to enhance the group’s performance on and commitment to set tasks and goals (Gladding, 2003).
 
4. Brainstorming
 
Brainstorming is a way of stimulating divergent thinking and it requires generating ideas in a non judgemental manner. Critical evaluation of ideas and actions can sometimes hold back creativity and member participation. Thus brainstorming aims to allow every member of the group to present their ideas first before any comments are made.
 
Quantity is emphasised in this activity, the more ideas, the more group members get involved and contribute to achieving the objectives of the group therapy. It is only after a larger number of ideas have been collected that the members are asked to collectively evaluate them and decide which to apply.
 
5. Teaching Skills
 
Sometimes group members can struggle through the group process due to a lack of skill in some key area that they need to apply. For example, they may be limited in their ability to relate well with others and as a consequence they may struggle to make the group process work for them and inhibit the greater potential of the group as a whole.
 
In such circumstances, to improve group performance, the group therapist may need to incorporate some teaching of new skills to bring certain group members or the whole group up to speed with an important skill set. By doing so, the group therapist is skilling up the group members to enable them to perform more effectively. Some of the skills that often need to be applied at the performing stage of the group include:
 
Embracing Individual responsibility and accountability: All group members must first agree on what needs to be done and by whom. Then, each member determines what he or she needs to do and then takes responsibility to do it. Each member is held accountable for their tasks, and they hold others accountable for theirs.
 
Giving and receiving constructive feedback: Group members need to know how to give and receive constructive feedback. Giving constructive feedback requires focusing on ideas and behaviours, instead of individuals, being as positive as possible and offering suggestions for improvement. Receiving feedback requires listening well, asking for clarification if the comment is unclear, and being open to change and new ideas.
 
Problem solving: Group members need to be able to help the group develop and use strategies central to their group goals. As such, group members need to play a part in facilitating group decision making and also need to know how to deal productively with conflict.
 
Manage and organize: Group members must also know how to plan and manage a task, how to manage their time, and how to assist in the smooth running of group meetings. In the performing stage of the group, members need to help ensure that meeting goals are set, that an agenda is created and followed, and that everyone has an opportunity to participate. They need to know how to stay focused on the task and how to help others to do so too.
 
Have a clear knowledge of everyone’s roles: When performing, group members need to know which roles can be filled within a group (e.g., facilitator, idea-generator, summariser, evaluator, mediator, encourager, recorder) and need to be aware of which role(s) they and others are best suited for.
 
Termination
 
While termination is considered the last stage of the group processes, in reality it marks a new beginning for each group member. Termination provides group members the opportunity to clarify the meaning of their experiences, consolidate the gains they have made and make decisions about the new behaviours they may want to take with them from the group and apply to their everyday lives. Within termination, there are numerous issues and processes to consider.
 
Often there are feelings of loss, sadness and separation anxiety. Frequently these feelings are mixed with those of hope, joy and accomplishment. There are also feelings of unfinished business, transference and counter transference. As such, it is crucial for the health and wellbeing of everyone that termination is handled correctly.
 
The process of termination needs to be facilitated intentionally by the group therapist to ensure it is positive and productive. One clear strategy that the group therapist should employ is in setting a clear time limit for the group (i.e. announcing in advance the number of meeting times that are left). The timeframe for the group should be clear from the commencement of the group and be flagged on occasion to ensure all group members know.
 
Capping, a process of emotional interaction and cognitive reflection among group members, should be encouraged as the group moves into disbanding (Gladding, 2003). Some of the areas covered in the process of capping include:
 
-       Reviewing and summarising the group experiences
-       Assessing members growth, change and achievements
-       Finishing business
-       Applying change to everyday life
-       Providing feedback
-       Handling good byes
-       Planning for continued problem solving
 
References:
 
-       Gladding. G.T. (2003) Group Work: A Counselling Speciality (4th Ed). New Jersey: Prentice Hall.
 
 
Did you enjoy this article? Then share the feeling and forward it to a friend! Quick reminder: Please send this eZine to all your family and friends so they too can enjoy the benefits. Thank you.
 
Join our community:
 
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Intobookstore
The Institute has a list of recommended textbooks and DVDs which can add great value to your learning journey - and the good news is that you can purchase them very easily. The AIPC bookstore will give YOU:
 
-      Discounted prices!
-      Easy ordering method!
-      Quality guarantee!
 
This fortnight's feature is...
 
Name: Theory and Practice of Group Counselling, 6th edition
Author: Corey, Gerald
AIPC Code: COREY3
AIPC Price: $98.95
ISBN: 0-534-59697-5
 
This book provides you with an in-depth overview of 10 group theories and also illustrates how to put these theories into practice. Corey’s discussion of process, theory and the application of those theories to the stages of a group will help you learn how to apply group counselling to a number of situations, including multicultural, ethical, school & time-limited contexts.
 
To order this book, simply contact your nearest Student Support Centre or the AIPC Head Office (1800 657 667).
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Intoarticles
Ethical Decision Making Process
 
Often a dilemma can be easily solved through applying basic problem solving concepts and/or by looking at relevant ethical codes. There are times when neither process will be sufficient to address the scope of a dilemma. When this arises, an ethical dilemma or problem may be approached from a number of frameworks. Two approaches are considered in this article:
 
1.     Ethical Principles
2.     Ethical Decision Making Framework
 
In all aspects of ethical problem solving, it is best to take a clear systematic approach avoiding ambiguity.
 
Click here to continue reading this article...
 
Other articles: www.aipc.net.au/articles
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Intodevelopment
Convenient Professional Development
 
Hundreds of counsellors, psychologists, social workers, mental health nurses and allied health professionals already access over 100 Hours of Professional Development online, for less than $1 a day. Now it's your turn.
 
Mental Health Academy (MHA) is the leading provider of professional development education for the mental health industry. MHA provides the largest variety of courses and videos workshops, all conveniently delivered via the internet.
 
With MHA, you no longer have to worry about high costs, proximity and availability, or fitting a workshop around your lifestyle!
 
You can access the huge range of PD, including courses and video workshops, whenever and from wherever you want.
 
Whether you are looking for courses on anxiety and depression, or a video workshop discussing the intricacies of relationship counselling - Mental Health Academy is your gateway to over 100 hours of professional development content.
 
Take a quick look at what Mental Health Academy offers:
 
-      Over 70 professionally developed courses.
-      On-demand, webstreamed video workshops.
-      Over 100 hours of professional development.
-      Extremely relevant topics.
-      New courses released every month.
-      Video supported training.
-      Online, 24/7 access to resources.
-      Endorsement by multiple Associations, including AASW, ACA and APS.
 
Begin your journey today. Click on the link below to register for a monthly or annual unlimited membership. As an unlimited member, you can access all MHA courses for less than $1 per day, and receive discounts when purchasing any video workshops:
 
 
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Intoconnection
Have you visited Counselling Connection, the Institute's Blog yet? We continually publish new and interesting posts including case studies, profiles, success stories and much more. Make sure you too get connected (and thank you for those who have already submitted comments and suggestions).
 
Goal Orientations Theory of Motivation
 
Goal orientations are cognitive representations of the general type of goal an individual will tend to pursue. Goal orientations are dynamic and subject to change as information pertaining to one’s performance on the task is processed. While an individual can hold a number of goal orientations that govern their reasons for engaging in an activity, research has primarily focused on two types of goals namely, task oriented goals and ego oriented goals. 

Task orientated goals: The primary motivation for action in pursuing the task oriented goal is to achieve mastery over the task through the application of relevant skills. By gaining mastery over a given task, the individual experiences self improvement which is also a motivational component for action.

Click here to continue reading this post...

Intimacy and Sex

For many couples, ‘making love’ involves a sense of intimacy and emotional closeness. An intimate sexual relationship involves trust and being vulnerable with each other. Closeness during sex is also linked to other forms of intimacy.

It is important to share a whole range of emotions with a partner, otherwise some people begin to feel lonely and isolated regardless of how good their sexual experiences may be. Explore ways to share love and affection without sex. Often, the more a couple is intimate with each other in ways other than sex, the more fulfilling their sex life becomes.

Click here to continue reading this post...

Blog Email: blog@aipc.net.au
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Intotwitter
Follow us on Twitter and get the latest and greatest in counselling news. To follow, visit https://twitter.com/counsellingnews and click "Follow".
 
Featured Tweets

https://www.psychologytoday.com/node/41926 -- Field Guide to the Truth Teller: I Cannot Tell a Lie

News: Mindfulness Therapy Effective for Depression Relapse https://bit.ly/h78YsJ

Brain's architecture makes our view of the world unique https://ow.ly/1ajOZG

From my.counseling.org: When The Counselor Needs Counseling https://tinyurl.com/2dlfkyb

https://www.sane.org/snapshots - stories of people living with mental illness

What if people reach out for suicide prevention support and no one responds? https://ow.ly/1afLHF

The Influence of Positive Framing https://bit.ly/gKTzqB

Note that you need a Twitter profile to follow a list. If you do not have one yet, visit https://twitter.com to create a free profile today!
 
Tweet Count: 2050
Follower Count: 2215
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Intoquotes
"They always say time changes things, but you actually have to change them yourself." 

~ Andy Warhol
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Intoseminars
Many students of the Diploma of Counselling attend seminars to complete the practical requirements of their course. Seminars provide an ideal opportunity to network with other students and liaise with qualified counselling professionals in conjunction with completing compulsory coursework.

Below are some of the seminars available for the first semester of 2011. To register for a seminar, please contact your Student Support Centre.

To access the full list, visit: www.aipc.net.au/students/seminars.

Diploma of Counselling (CDA) Timetable

Northern Territory
The Counselling Process: 25/06
Communication Skills I: 26/02
Communication Skills II: 16/04
Family Therapy: 02/04
Case Management: 12-13/02

South Australia
The Counselling Process: 29/01, 26/03, 28/05
Communication Skills I: 05/02, 02/04, 04/06
Communication Skills II: 06/02, 03/04, 05/06
Counselling Therapies I: 12-13/02, 07-08/05
Counselling Therapies II: 26-27/02, 21-22/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks: 01/05
Family Therapy: 29/05
Case Management: 19-20/02, 18-19/06

Sydney
The Counselling Process: 15/01, 04/02, 28/02, 21/03, 09/04, 06/05, 28/05, 03/06, 29/06
Communication Skills I: 14/02, 17/03, 14/04, 13/05, 17/06
Communication Skills II: 15/02, 18/03, 15/04, 20/05, 22/06
Counselling Therapies I: 10-11/01, 17-18/02, 28-29/04, 15-16/06
Counselling Therapies II: 03-04/03, 30-31/05
Case Management: 02-03/02, 24-25/03, 26-27/05

Western Australia
The Counselling Process: 15/01, 19/02, 19/03, 16/04, 14/05, 18/06
Communication Skills I: 08/01, 12/02, 12/03, 30/04, 28/05
Communication Skills II: 09/01, 13/02, 13/03, 01/05, 29/05
Counselling Therapies I: 22-23/01, 09-10/04, 11-12/06
Counselling Therapies II: 26-27/02, 07-08/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks: 20/02, 19/06
Family Therapy: 17/04
Case Management: 29-30/01, 21-22/05

Brisbane
The Counselling Process: 12/02, 30/04
Communication Skills I: 05/03, 28/05
Communication Skills II: 05/02, 02/04, 25/06
Counselling Therapies I: 26-27/03
Counselling Therapies II: 16-17/04
Legal & Ethical Frameworks: 14/05
Family Therapy: 04/06
Case Management: 19-20/02

Tasmania
The Counselling Process: 20/02, 22/05
Communication Skills I: 27/03, 26/06
Communication Skills II: 06/02, 08/05
Counselling Therapies I: 19-20/03
Counselling Therapies II: 30/04-01/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks: 29/05
Family Therapy: 13/03
Case Management: 09-10/04

Melbourne
The Counselling Process: 14/01, 05/02, 27/02, 03/04, 08/05, 17/06
Communication Skills I: 08/01, 20/02, 27/03, 09/04, 07/05, 03/06
Communication Skills II: 09/01, 26/02, 26/03, 02/04, 01/05, 10/06
Counselling Therapies I: 15-16/01, 05-06/03, 16-17/04, 14-15/05, 18-19/06
Counselling Therapies II: 22-23/01, 12-13/03, 23-24/04, 21-22/05, 25-26/06
Legal & Ethical Frameworks: 13/02, 05/06
Family Therapy: 19/02, 04/06
Case Management: 29-30/01, 19-20/03, 28-29/05

Sunshine Coast
The Counselling Process: 05/02, 16/04
Communication Skills I: 12/03, 04/06
Communication Skills II: 13/03, 05/06
Counselling Therapies I: 02-03/04
Counselling Therapies II: 21-22/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks: 18/06
Case Management: 25-26/06

Gold Coast
The Counselling Process: 29/01, 16/04
Communication Skills I: 26/02, 21/05
Communication Skills II: 19/03, 18/06
Counselling Therapies I: 25-26/03
Counselling Therapies II: 06-07/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks: 15/04
Case Management: 01-02/04

Diploma of Professional Counselling (DPCD) Timetable

Northern Territory
Communication Skills I: 26/02
Communication Skills II: 16/04
The Counselling Process: 25/06
Counselling Therapies I: 19-20/03
Counselling Therapies II: 30/04-01/05
Case Management: 12-13/02
Advanced Counselling Techniques: 12/03, 11/06
Counselling Applications: 07/05

South Australia
Communication Skills I: 05/02, 02/04, 04/06
Communication Skills II: 06/02, 03/04, 05/06
The Counselling Process: 29/01, 26/03, 28/05
Counselling Therapies I: 12-13/02, 07-08/05
Counselling Therapies II: 26-27/02, 21-22/05
Case Management: 19-20/02, 18-19/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques: 30/01
Counselling Applications: 27/03

Sydney
Communication Skills I: 14/02, 17/03, 14/04, 13/05, 17/06
Communication Skills II: 15/02, 18/03, 15/04, 20/05, 22/06
The Counselling Process: 15/01, 04/02, 28/02, 21/03, 09/04, 06/05, 28/05, 03/06, 29/06
Counselling Therapies I: 10-11/01, 17-18/02, 28-29/04, 15-16/06
Counselling Therapies II: 03-04/03, 30-31/05
Case Management: 02-03/02, 24-25/03, 26-27/05
Advanced Counselling Techniques: 31/01, 31/03, 04/06
Counselling Applications: 19/02, 01/04

Western Australia
Communication Skills I: 08/11, 12/02, 12/03, 30/04, 28/05
Communication Skills II: 09/01, 13/02, 13/03, 01/05, 29/05
The Counselling Process: 15/01, 19/02, 19/03, 16/04, 14/05, 18/06
Counselling Therapies I: 22-23/01, 09-10/04, 11-12/06
Counselling Therapies II: 26-27/02, 07-08/05
Case Management: 29-30/01, 21-22/05
Advanced Counselling Techniques: 16/01, 15/05
Counselling Applications: 20/03

Brisbane
Communication Skills I: 05/03, 28/05
Communication Skills II: 05/02, 02/04, 25/06
The Counselling Process: 12/02, 30/04
Counselling Therapies I: 18-19/06
Case Management: 19-20/02
Advanced Counselling Techniques: 26/02, 11/06
Counselling Applications: 12/03

Tasmania
Communication Skills I:  27/03, 26/06
Communication Skills II: 06/02, 08/05
The Counselling Process: 20/02, 22/05
Case Management: 09-10/04
Advanced Counselling Techniques: 27/02, 19/06
Counselling Applications: 03/04

Melbourne
Communication Skills I: 08/01, 20/02, 27/03, 09/04, 07/05, 03/06
Communication Skills II: 09/01, 26/02, 26/03, 02/04, 01/05, 10/06
The Counselling Process: 14/01, 05/02, 27/02, 03/04, 08/05, 17/06
Counselling Therapies I: 15-16/01, 05-06/03, 16-17/04, 14-15/05, 18-19/06
Counselling Therapies II: 22- 23/01, 12-13/03, 23-24/04, 21-22/05, 25-26/06
Case Management: 29-30/01, 19-20/03, 28-29/05
Advanced Counselling Techniques: 06/02, 30/04, 12/06
Counselling Applications: 12/02, 10/04, 11/06

Sunshine Coast
Communication Skills I: 12/03, 04/06
Communication Skills II: 13/03, 05/06
The Counselling Process: 05/02, 16/04
Counselling Therapies I: 02-03/04
Counselling Therapies II: 21-22/05
Case Management: 25-26/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques: 09/04
Counselling Applications: 28/05

Important Note: Advertising of the dates above does not guarantee availability of places in the seminar. Please check availability with the respective Student Support Centre.
 
 
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