In this Issue

Hello!
Intobachelor
Intothediploma
Intonews
Intomhss
Intocounselling
Intobookstore
Intoarticles
Intodevelopment
Intoconnection
Intotwitter
Intoquotes
Intoseminars

Contact us

Publications

Editor: Sandra Poletto
Email: ezine@aipc.net.au
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Copyright: 2012 Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors

Hello!
Welcome to Edition 191 of Institute Inbrief. In a previous edition we introduced you to what mindfulness is (and is not), and showcased a range of therapeutic interventions that are based on mindfulness training and principles. In this edition’s featured article, we explore the clinical benefits of mindfulness-based approaches. 
 
Also in this edition:
  • News: The Healthy Weight Program
  • MHSS Workshops: October/November
  • Articles and CPD updates
  • Blog and Twitter updates
  • Upcoming seminar dates
Enjoy your reading,
 
Editor.
 
 
Join our community:
 
 
 
 
 
Intobachelor
 
Become A Counsellor or Expand On Your Qualifications
With Australia’s Most Cost Effective & Flexible
 Bachelor of Counselling
 
SEMESTER 1, 2014 INTAKE: NOW OPEN
 
AIPC is Australia’s largest and longest established educator of Counsellors. Over the past 22-years we’ve helped over 55,000 people from 27 countries pursue their dream of becoming a professional Counsellor.
 
The Bachelor of Counselling is a careful blend of theory and practical application. Theory is learnt through user-friendly learning materials that have been carefully designed to make your studies as accessible and conducive to learning as possible.
 
You can gain up to a full year’s academic credit (and save up to $8,700.00 with RPL) with a Diploma qualification. And with Fee-Help you don’t have to pay your subject fees upfront.
 
Here are some facts about the course:
  • Save up to $57,000.00 on your qualification.
  • Get started with NO MONEY DOWN using FEE-HELP.
  • Save up to $8,700.00 with RPL.
  • You will be supported by a large team of highly-qualified counselling professionals.
  • Study externally with individualised personal support.
  • Attend Residential Schools in Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane to hone your practical skills and network with other students.
You can learn more here: www.aipc.edu.au/degree
 
Watch our 2013 TV ad: www.aipc.net.au/tv2013
 
 
Become A Psychologist
 
Earn-While-You-Learn With Australia's
Best Value-for-Money & Flexible
Bachelor of Psychological Science
 
SEMESTER 1, 2014 INTAKE: NOW OPEN
 
Psychology is one of the most versatile undergraduate courses, leading to many different career opportunities. And now there's a truly flexible way to get your qualification – with internal or external study options. It means working while you study is a realistic alternative.
 
Cost of living pressures and lifestyle choices are evolving the way we learn and Australian Institute of Psychology (AIP) is paving the way through flexible, innovative learning models:
  • Save up to $34,800 on your qualification.
  • Get started with NO MONEY DOWN with FEE-HELP.
  • Earn while you learn with flexible external learning options.
  • Be supported by a large team of highly-qualified Psychology professionals.
  • Study internally or externally with individualised personal support.
  • Enjoy a flexible and supportive learning experience.
  • Benefit from less onerous course entry requirements.
AIP is a registered Higher Education Provider with the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations, delivering a three-year Bachelor of Psychological Science. The Bachelor of Psychological Science is accredited by the Australian Psychology Accreditation Council (APAC), the body that sets the standards of training for Psychology education in Australasia.
 
APAC accreditation requirements are uniform across all universities and providers in the country, meaning that Australian Institute of Psychology, whilst a private Higher Education Provider, is required to meet exactly the same high quality standards of training, education and support as any university provider in the country.
 
You can learn more here: www.aip.edu.au/degree
 
Watch our 2013 TV ad: www.aip.edu.au/tv2013
 
Intothediploma
 
Imagine Being Passionate About Your Work
And Assisting People Every Day Lead Better Lives
 

It’s rare these days to hear people talk about their work with true passion. You hear so many stories of people working to pay the bills; putting up with imperfect situations; and compromising on their true desires.
 
That’s why it’s always so refreshing to hear regular stories from graduates living their dream to be a Counsellor. They’re always so full of energy, enthusiasm and passion. There’s no doubt that counselling is one of the most personally rewarding and enriching professions.
 
Just imagine someone comes to you for assistance. They’re emotionally paralysed by events in their life. They can’t even see a future for themselves. They can only focus on their pain and grief. The despair is so acute it pervades their entire life. Their relationship is breaking down and heading towards a divorce. They can’t focus on work and are getting in trouble with their boss. They feel they should be able to handle their problems alone, but know they can’t. It makes them feel helpless, worthless. Their self-esteem has never been lower. They’re caught in a cycle of destruction and pain.
 
Now imagine you have the knowledge and skills to help this person overcome their challenges. You assist to relieve their intense emotional pain. You give them hope for the future. You assist to rebuild their self-esteem and lead a satisfying, empowered life.
 
As a Counsellor you can experience these personal victories every day. And it’s truly enriching. There is nothing more fulfilling than helping another person overcome seemingly impossible obstacles.
 
Learn more here: www.aipc.net.au/lz
 
Intonews
 
Healthy Weight Program for delivery by Counsellors
 
Following is a letter by Philip Armstrong, CEO of the Australian Counselling Association:
 
“You are cordially invited to the official release of the Healthy Weight Program (HWP). The HWP is a modulised psycho-social and dietary program designed specifically for delivery by counsellors. The HWP represents an opportunity to counsellors to deliver a niche product to the $832 million weight loss industry.
 
As you are no doubt aware, poor diet and exercise habits are commonly driven by emotion. The HWP employs a unique and powerful approach in that it simultaneously addresses the core emotional issues that result in poor eating and exercise habits. The program is delivered over an eight week period under the guidance of a counsellor. Over the eight weeks the client applies, and is educated about, better dietary and exercise habits, whilst also dealing with their emotional barriers.
 
The HWP can be seamlessly incorporated into your practice, with the potential of significantly increasing your turnover (you can charge substantially more for the program than you would for regular sessions).
 
The Healthy Weight Program information session will cover the following:
  • The History of the development of the HWP
  • The Weight Industry and where Counsellors fit
  • How the program works
  • Tools for the program
  • Pricing & Profit
  • Marketing material
  • Licensure
  • Business Training and Coaching for Licensees
  • Future directions of the program
After the information session there will be an opportunity to secure a license at a heavily discounted rate (for attendees on the day only). As a partner with the HWP, ACA will be hosting this seminar from 6pm to 8pm in November on the following dates and venues:
 
Sydney: Saturday 9th – Rendezvous Sydney Central Cnr George and Quay St
Perth: Monday 11th – Balmoral Hotel 901 Albany Highway Victoria Park
Adelaide: Wednesday 13th – Mantra 55-67 Hindmarsh Square
Melbourne: Friday 15th – Rendezvous Grand Hotel 328 Flinders St Melbourne
Brisbane: Friday 22nd – AIP Level 2, 140 Brunswick Street, Fortitude Valley
 
Coffee and tea will be available. No entry fees.
 
To ensure seating and catering requirements are met please RSVP to jovana@theaca.net.au at least 24 hours prior to the seminar of your choice.
 
Further seminars will be organised in early 2014 for major regional centres, Hobart and Darwin.”
 
 
Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Helps Lower Blood Pressure
 
A new study shows that blood pressure is effectively lowered by mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) for patients with borderline high blood pressure or “prehypertension.”
 
“Our results provide evidence that MBSR, when added to lifestyle modification advice, may be an appropriate complementary treatment for BP in the prehypertensive range,” said Joel W. Hughes, PhD, of Kent State University in Ohio.
 
The study included 56 women and men diagnosed with prehypertension — blood pressure that was higher than desirable, but not so high that antihypertensive drugs would be prescribed.
 
Prehypertension is receiving increased attention from doctors because it is associated with a wide range of heart disease and other cardiovascular problems. About 30 percent of Americans have prehypertension and may be prescribed medications for this condition, according to the researchers.
 
Click here to read full article.
 
Intomhss
 
Australia is suffering a Mental Health Crisis
 
Our suicide rate is now TWICE our road toll. Many suicides could possibly be averted, if only the people close to the victim were able to identify the early signs and appropriately intervene.
 
RIGHT NOW someone you care about – a family member, friend, or colleague – may be suffering in silence, and you don’t know.
 
With the right training, you can help that family member, friend or colleague.
 
Save $100 when you book your seat in an upcoming MHSS Workshop.
 
Upcoming workshops in October/November:
  • Narre Warren, VIC: 24 & 25 October
  • Glandore, SA: 26 & 27 October
  • Gold Coast, QLD: 26 & 27 October
  • Gold Coast, QLD: 2 & 3 November
  • Gold Coast, QLD: 9 & 10 November
  • Launceston, TAS: 14 & 15 November
  • Glandore, SA: 16 & 17 November
  • Gold Coast, QLD: 16 & 17 November
  • Ferny Grove, QLD: 16 & 17 November
  • Gold Coast, QLD: 23 & 24 November
  • East Doncaster, VIC: 28 & 29 November
  • Gold Coast, QLD: 30 November & 1 December
Book your seat now: www.mhss.net.au/find-a-course
 
Your registration includes the 2-day facilitated workshop; a hardcopy of the MHSS Student Workbook; and access to an online dashboard where you can obtain your certificate, watch role-play videos, and much more.
 
Endorsements
 
The Mental Health Social Support workshop is approved by several industry Associations for continuing professional development. Current endorsements include:
  • Australian Association of Social Workers: 14 CPD hours
  • Australian College of Mental Health Nurses: 14 CPE Points
  • Australian College of Midwives: 14 MidPLUS Points
  • Australian Community Workers Association: 5 CPE Points
  • Australian Counselling Association: 28 OPD Points
  • Australian Physiotherapy Association: 14 CPD Hours
  • Australian Practice Nurses Association: 14 CPD Hours
  • Royal College of Nursing, Australia: 12.5 CNE Points
MHSS Specialties
 
Once you complete the MHSS Core program you can undertake the MHSS Specialty Programs:
  1. Aiding Addicts;
  2. Supporting those with Depression or Anxiety
  3. Supporting the Suicidal and Suicide Bereaved
  4. Supporting Challenged Families.
Book your seat at the next MHSS Workshop now and save $100.
 
If you have any queries, please contact Pedro Gondim on pedro@mhss.net.au.
 
Intocounselling
 
The benefits of mindfulness practice
 
In a previous article we introduced you to what mindfulness is (and is not), and showcased a range of therapeutic interventions that are based on mindfulness training and principles. In this article, we explore the clinical benefits of mindfulness-based approaches.  
 
Mindfulness interventions have been shown to be beneficial for a wide range of psychological and physical conditions such as anxiety, depression, chronic pain, personality disorders, and addictions. Controlled trials of normal populations have also demonstrated positive changes in brain function and immune response, self-awareness, perceived stress, and increase in self-compassion (Shapiro, Astin, Bishop, & Cordova, 2005; Beddoe & Murphy, 2004), and there is more.
 
Some of the benefits are not directly obvious, but they lead to recognisable clusters of improvement.We look at the evidence and what the experts say.
 
Developing the Observer Self, or Witness, aids growth and awareness
 
If all of a person’s consciousness is tied up with experiencing, say, pain, sadness, or anger, it is as if that person is living in a small trailer home: existence is cramped and uncomfortable; there is much suffering. But if that same person is able to disidentify, or do what mindfulness advocates call “decentering” (Segal, Williams & Teasdale, 2002), s/he can gain a much wider perspective: akin to moving to from the trailer to a mansion. 
 
This process happens when people are able, though mindfulness and other practices, to develop what is called the Witness, or Observer Self. It is, metaphorically, as if someone has gone from swimming in a turbulent stream – tossed around by all of its currents and eddies – to a position on the banks of the stream, where all of the relentless activity of the stream can be watched, and thus not experienced as intensely. As we gain in the capacity to observe ourselves, we accrue some of the benefits of mindfulness.
 
Focus and concentration improve: This seems paradoxical, because in mindfulness practice, there is no intention to focus or concentrate on a single thought. Yet practitioners find that, by allowing all thoughts to come and go but choosing which ones they engage with, they have still practiced the art of directing awareness. Improved focus and concentration are the result. 
 
Self-awareness increases: When someone has, for instance, a “Worrying Self” (referred to more generally as the Thinking Self) and also an Observer Self, the Worrying Self may be caught up in the worries. But the Observer Self is able to say, “I’m having worrying thoughts” or “I see that I am thinking worrying thoughts.” 
 
In that moment of shifting one’s centre of consciousness from the Worrying Self to the Observer Self, a person has gained self-awareness. S/he comes to understand that he or she worries, but is more than the worrier; there is a distinction between the person and his/her thoughts. Moreover, the person becomes aware of how and when the worrying occurs, and what the contents of worrying are.
 
In some situations, separating from one’s thoughts allows the person to become aware of what s/he has been avoiding. By tuning into the body that is responding to the mind that is worrying, a person becomes more aware of the body, and the environment in which it functions. Moreover, by experiencing the relative calm of the Observer, a person is able to know a more inclusive, expanded sense of him/herself beyond body, feelings, and mind (Harris, 2008; Walsh, 2006).
 
The head clears, and one is fully present: Reducing worrying (or whatever preoccupation one is engaging in) as an uncontrolled endeavour and standing (metaphorically) to the side of the gushing waters of thought allows a clear head: a cleared space, psychologically speaking, that is not consumed with, say, worry.
 
One can be fully present in the here and now, more connected to self, others, and the external world. A by-product of this experience is that of having more direct contact with the world, rather than living through one’s thoughts (Harris, 2008). 
 
The impact of stressful thoughts and feelings is reduced
 
As we alluded to above, the mindful standing beside the stream (of consciousness) watching its waters gush down the riverbed is not as intense or stressful an experience as being washed downstream with it. Self-defeating thought processes are “caught” earlier in the game (further upstream in our metaphor), so the mindful person can let them go, as we noted in referring to the Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) developed by Teasdale et al (1995).
 
When stressful thoughts and feelings are reduced, so, too, are overall stress levels, with all the attendant improvements in health (see below). In some cases, a person’s thoughts may be so stressful that he or she cannot even experience them safely until doing so in the context of mindfulness practices (Harris, 2008).
 
In a controlled randomised experiment conducted with health professionals in Palo Alto, California, the experimental group underwent eight two-hour sessions of mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) training. The control group experienced no intervention. Results showed a significant difference in perceived stress after the training compared with pre- and post-perceived stress scores for the control group (Shapiro, Astin, Bishop, & Cordova, 2005).
 
Performance and coping skills are enhanced through improved mental function
 
The health professionals of the Palo Alto study also reported much greater decrease of job burnout than their control group cohorts: 10 percent vs. 4 percent (Shapiro et al, 2005). Other experts insist that mindfulness improves people’s memory, helps them to learn more easily (perhaps through increased capacity for focus and concentration?), and enhances problem-solving ability (Reachout.com, 2013). Moreover, better life decisions – those emanating from attunement with one’s life purpose, discerned through stillness – are claimed to be a gift of mindfulness meditation (Meditation Society of Australia, 2013). 
 
A study of nursing students doing an eight-week MBSR course showed improved coping skills in those who completed the program. The students’ decrease in anxiety was significant, and there were favourable downward trends in their attitude toward work, perception of time pressure, and total stress levels (Beddoe & Murphy, 2004).
 
Long-term psychodynamic therapy patients with diagnoses ranging from anxiety and obsessive neuroses to narcissistic and borderline personality disorders were studied by Kutz et al (1985). They completed a 10-week MBSR program while continuing with their individual psychotherapy and showed statistically significant improvements in a variety of self- and therapist-rated symptoms.
 
Creativity, life appreciation, and happiness accelerate
 
Creativity is liberated: It is useful in life to be able to react to some situations with an “automatic pilot” function. If we had to figure out from scratch how to respond to every stimulus, we would have little energy or time for anything else. Thus, we generally get dressed, catch the train to work, and wash dishes with little conscious thought. The challenge for exercising our creativity comes when we want to break out of the rut and think more originally about a situation or issue. 
 
Mindfulness practice can help to ease the automatic pilot’s grip on the mind, and in a relaxed, aware state, we are more open to possibilities arising from lateral and divergent thinking. We are more able to set aside our assumptions about how the world is and go receptive to novel insights emerging. Our unconscious mind is then freed to process information differently, and resultant – often original and effective – solutions arrive via what the Christians call “grace” and the Buddhists call “spontaneously arising wisdom” (Walsh, 2006).
 
Some have noted that “the essence of real creativity is the same revelatory experience encountered in meditation” (Meditation Society of Australia, 2013). The advantages of mindful stillness are seen in enhanced capacity to access that repository of infinite creativity within.
 
Life becomes fulfilling, vibrant: Not only do moments of insight and creative perception astonish and delight us, but when we are starting from a higher baseline level of mindfulness, we find that life in general becomes more fulfilling. Experiences that are intrinsically pleasant, such as eating, having sex, and listening to music, become even more so when we are fully “in the moment”, and ordinary experiences (such as the above-mentioned going to work or washing dishes) become infused with vibrancy and interest. And boredom? It becomes a thing of the past.
 
Happiness capacity goes up: Understandably, experiencing moments of grace, wisdom, and creativity and perceiving all of life more positively make for a substantially improved “happiness quotient”. Mindfulness practitioners are led back to the claim – arising in all of the world’s major religions – that “The kingdom of heaven is within” (Jesus Christ, in Meditation Society of Australia, 2013).   That is, lasting happiness is an experience which flows from within, and exists independently of our external circumstances. As our mindfulness evolves, we become increasingly happier. 
 
Relationships improve: Totally apart from the obvious advantages to relationships of participants in them being relaxed and aware, mindfulness imparts several benefits which begin as intrapersonal enhancements, but are claimed by many mindfulness advocates to extend to interpersonal relationships.
 
Self-compassion is shown to increase: The MBSR-trained health professionals discussed above were significantly higher than their control group counterparts on measures of self-compassion. The researchers also found that the MBSR-trained professionals reported greater satisfaction with life than the control group (Shapiro et al, 2005).
 
Such findings would not surprise Harris, a proponent of mindfulness and also Acceptance & Commitment Therapy, who claims that mindfulness facilitates better relationships (Harris, 2008). Other mental health experts claim that mindfulness practice results in decreased anxiety and depression, less moodiness and anger, and greater emotional stability (Reachout.com, 2013). Additionally, mindfulness appears to thicken the areas of the brain in charge of decision-making, emotional flexibility and empathy (UCLA Mindful Awareness Research Center [MARC], n.d.). All of the above must surely also benefit others in relationship with mindfulness practitioners. 
 
Mindfulness decreases emotional contagion: Research over the last several decades has identified what most people recognise intuitively on an unconscious level: there is a tendency for human beings (and also non-human mammals) to subtly synchronise their facial expressions, voices, and postures with others in their immediate environment (Hatfield, Cacioppo, & Rapson, 1993). This is undeniably pleasant when positive emotions are being shared, but it is called emotional contagion because it also can mean that we feed off each other’s fear, anger, shame, and low moods. 
 
A neurological process has been identified that supports this notion of mutual imitation. Mammals (including human beings) have a system of “mirror neurons” which fire both when we perform a particular action and also when we perceive someone else perform that same action (Rizzolatti, Fogassi, & Gallese, 2001). 
 
Mindfulness allows people to stay present to the other person without firing the neurons that bind up their emotional responses to that of the other. Having thus greater immunity from the “contagion”, mindfulness practitioners are freed to respond in a wiser, less reactive manner. Just staying present to a situation and to our own breath without getting drawn into the other person’s dramas can mean that, instead of unskilful (habitual) response, we can interrupt escalation of destructive emotions, creating a positive outcome for all concerned (Walsh, 2006). 
 
The nursing students study also found that the MBSR-trained group had decreased tendencies to take on others’ negative emotions (Beddoe & Murphy, 2004). 
 
Physical functioning is enhanced
 
General health: On a physical level, mindfulness is said to slow down a person’s nervous system, inducing – through the relaxation -- the alpha brainwaves that give the body greater opportunity to heal (Reachout.com, 2013; Walsh, 2006). Some research has suggested that mindfulness also lowers blood pressure, improves circulation, and assists those with conditions such as ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) (MARC, n.d.). 
 
The metabolism of a practitioner becomes more efficient, and such a person becomes more responsive to his or her body through being more in contact with it. The capacity for heightened attentiveness that is part and parcel of mindfulness also greatly increases such phenomena as the “runner’s high”, making exercise even more appealing to engage. 
 
With so many benefits for the physical body, it is not surprising that studies have also found improved functioning of the immune system in regular practitioners. Those engaging mindfulness for just eight weeks showed an increased response of antibodies to flu vaccination (Davidson & Kabat-Zinn, 2003). The same study also showed mindfulness practitioners to have increased blood flow to the left frontal cortex of the brain, an area associated with increased optimism and a sense of wellbeing; this was similar to the increased satisfaction with life noted by subjects in the Shapiro, et al, study (2005) above.  
 
In studies with other medical disorders, patients with fibromyalgia who underwent MBSR training reported improvement in a variety of symptoms, and a study of psoriasis patients showed that patients listening to mindfulness audiotapes during light-therapy sessions were able to clear up their skin more quickly than a control group (65 versus 97 days) (Baer, 2003).
 
Those engaging mindfulness are said to be able to breathe better. They also gain an improved quality of sleep, because when the mind is calm, a person can fall asleep more easily and sleep more soundly (Meditation Society of Australia, 2013).
 
Reduced suffering (physical pain): Most people deal with major pain from illness or injury at some stage in their lives, and some people deal with it chronically. Where painkillers and the medical team can do no more, mindfulness can step into the breach. It has been clinically demonstrated that, in a very high state of concentration, a person’s pain, even very acute pain, can be transformed into a sort of moving energy, which tends to greatly diminish the suffering in the moment. 
 
Mindfulness practitioners have noted that, upon experiencing pain in such a way, they were able to empower themselves and even feel nurtured by the pain. Thus mindfulness skills provide not only pain management, but also a sense of the meaningfulness of pain as it contributes to personal growth (Walsh, 2006).
 
Four studies examined the effects of MBSR on patients with chronic pain. In general, findings showed statistically significant improvements in ratings of pain, other medical symptoms, and general psychological symptoms; many of the findings were maintained at follow-up evaluations (Baer, 2003). 
 
Reduced suffering (emotional pain, compulsions and addictions): Mindfulness skills can also be used to deal with emotional pain. By accurately discerning the mental images, words, and bodily sensations that constellate a dense emotion such as anger, jealousy, fear, or shame, a mindful person can deconstruct it, disidentifying from it while still allowing it to flow without suppression. 
 
Similarly, compulsive behaviours and addictions can be overcome by “staying with” unwholesome urges until they weaken and pass. Moreover, many mindfulness proponents can attest to the natural “high” they get from practicing mindfulness skills: a worthy replacement, they claim, for the unhealthy high of alcohol and substance addiction.
 
Looking at specific psychological disorders, we can note that patients with anxiety and depression disorders found significant improvements in measures of anxiety and depression. In another study, female patients with binge-eating disorders showed statistically significant improvements in several measures of eating and mood after training in MBSR (Kristeller & Hallett, 1999). The effects of MBCT on rates of depressive relapse were similarly positive. 
 
Teasdale, Williams, Soulsby, Segal, Ridgeway, & Lau (2000) found that, among participants who had discontinued their medications before undergoing the Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy, the rate of relapse into a depressive episode was only 37% for MBCT patients (with three or more prior depressive episodes) as opposed to 66% of the control group during a one-year follow-up period.
 
This article was adapted from the upcoming “Mindfulness in Therapeutic Practice” Mental Health Academy CPD course. The purpose of this course is to acquaint you with mindfulness as it is conceptualised and practiced in Western contexts, and to identify the chief therapeutic uses that it has so far been put to.

For more information, visit
www.mentalhealthacademy.com.au/premium
 
References:
 
Beddoe, A.E. & Murphy, S.O. (2004). Does mindfulness decrease stress and foster empathy among nursing students? Journal of Nursing Education, 43(7), 305-312.
 
Davidson, R.J. & Kabat-Zinn, J. (2003). Alterations in brain and immune function produced by mindfulness meditation. Psychosomatic Medicine, 65, 564-570.
 
Harris, R. (2008). What is mindfulness? The Happiness trap: stop struggling, start living. Business Systems Online.  Retrieved on 8 May, 2013, from: hyperlink.
 
Hatfield, E., Cacioppo, J.T., & Rapson, R.L. (1993). Emotional contagion. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
 
Kristeller, J.L., & Hallett, C.B. (1999). An exploratory study of a meditation-based intervention for binge eating disorder. Journal of Health Psychology, 4, 357-363.
 
Kutz, I., Leserman, J., Dorrignton, C., Morrison, C., Borysenko, J., & Benson, H. (1985). Meditation as an adjunct to psychotherapy. Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, 43, 209-218.
 
Meditation Society of Australia. (2013). Spiritual quotes from any religions and faiths. Meditation.org.au. Retrieved on 8 May, 2013, from: hyperlink.
          
Meditation Society of Australia. (2013). The gifts of meditation. Meditation.org.au. Retrieved on 8 May, 2013, from: hyperlink.           
 
Rizzolatti, G., Fogassi, L., & Gallese, V. (2001). Neurophysiological mechanisms underlying the understanding and imitation of action. Nature Reviews/Neuroscience, 2, 661-670.
 
Segal, Z.V., Williams, J.M.G., & Teasdale, J.D. (2002). Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for depression: A new approach to preventing relapse. New York: Guilford Press.
 
Shapiro, S.L., Astin, J.A., Bishop, S.R., & Cordova, M. (2005). Mindfulness-based stress reduction for health care professionals: results from a randomised trial. International Journal of Stress Management, 12 (2), 164-176. 
 
Teasdale, J.D., Segal, Z.V., & Williams, M.G. (1995). How does cognitive therapy prevent depressive relapse and why should attentional control (mindfulness training) help? Behaviour Research and Therapy, 33, 25-39.
 
UCLA Mindful Awareness Research Center. (n.d.). About MARC. Author. UCLA Health System. Retrieved on 8 May, 2013, from: hyperlink
 
Walsh, C. (2006). Some of the benefits of mindfulness. Mindfulness.org.au. Retrieved on 8 May, 2013, from: hyperlink.       
 
Course information:
 
 
Join our community:
 
 
 
 
 
Intobookstore
 
The Institute has a list of recommended textbooks and DVDs that can add great value to your learning journey - and the good news is that you can purchase them very easily. The AIPC bookstore will give you discounted prices, an easy ordering method and quality guarantee!
 
This fortnight's feature is...
 
Name: Case Approach to Counseling and Psychotherapy, 8th Edition
Authors: Corey, Gerald
AIPC Code: COREY2
AIPC Price: $98.80 (RRP $117.95)
ISBN: 978-111-184-1768
 
Organised to allow different theories to be compared easily, this book illustrates the skilful application of theory and allows you to learn by seeing a therapeutic approach in action.
 
To order this book, contact your Student Support Centre or the AIPC Head Office (1800 657 667).
 
Intoarticles
 
Group Problem-Solving Strategies, Part 1
 
A number of problems can occur during the formation of the group and afterwards. Some of these difficulties involve group members while others are related to group processes. One of the best ways to handle group problems is to prevent them. Where prevention is not possible, the group members and the group therapist can work together to bring about resolution (Gladding, 2003).
 
Click here to continue reading this article.
 
 
Happiness and Positive Psychology
 
Positive Psychology’s primary focus is on what people do right to obtain and maintain optimum happiness (Compton, 2005), by striving to understand and help people develop qualities that lead to greater personal fulfilment. The premise of positive psychology is to promote factors that allow individuals to thrive and flourish by encouraging a change of focus in psychology from a preoccupation with repairing the worst things to a greater emphasis on discovering and building upon positive qualities.
 
Click here to continue reading this article.
 
More articles: www.aipc.net.au/articles
 
Intodevelopment
 
Mental Health Academy – First to Knowledge in Mental Health
 
Get unlimited access to over 50 hours of CPD video workshops and over 100 specialist courses, for just $39/month or $349/year. Plus FREE and EXCLUSIVE access to the 10-hour Psychological First Aid program ($595.00 value).
 
We want you to experience unlimited, unrestricted access to the largest repository of professional development programs available anywhere in the country.
 
When you join our Premium Level membership, you’ll get all-inclusive access to over 50 hours of video workshops (presented by leading mental health experts) on-demand, 24/7.
 
You’ll also get access to over 100 specialist courses exploring a huge range of topics, including counselling interventions, communications skills, conflict, child development, mental health disorders, stress and trauma, relationships, ethics, reflective practice, plus much more. 
 
You’ll also get FREE and EXCLUSIVE access to the Psychological First Aid course ($595.00 value). The PFA course a high quality 10-hour program developed by Mental Health Academy in partnership with the Australian Institute of Psychology and the Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors, and framed around the internationally accepted principals of the NCTSN Field Operations Guide.
 
Benefits of becoming a premium member:
  • FREE and exclusive PFA course ($595.00 value)
  • Over 100 specialist courses to choose from
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Upcoming programs:
  • Mindfulness in Therapeutic Practice
  • Managing Chronic Pain
  • Treating Depression in the Older Client
  • A Constructive-Developmental Approach in Therapy: Case Studies
  • Sitting with Shadow: Case Studies
  • Acceptance and Commitment Therapy
  • Dialectical Behaviour Therapy
  • Emotionally Focused Therapy
  • Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy
  • Primary Issues in Counselling the Disabled
Learn more and join today: www.mentalhealthacademy.com.au/premium
 
Intoconnection
 
Have you visited the Counselling Connection Blog yet? There are over 600 interesting posts including case studies, profiles, success stories, videos and much more. Make sure you too get connected (and thank you for those who have already submitted comments and suggestions).
 
ACT: Definitions, Goals and Underlying Philosophy
 
Acceptance and commitment therapy (usually pronounced as the word “act” rather than the initials “A-C-T”) is a form of clinical behavioural analysis developed in 1986 by psychologists Steven Hayes, Kelly Wilson, and Kirk Strosahl. Originally called comprehensive distancing, it gets its current name from one of its core messages: the injunction to accept what is out of one’s personal control and commit to action that improves and enriches one’s life.
 
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Intotwitter
 
Follow us on Twitter and get the latest and greatest in counselling news. To follow, visit http://twitter.com/counsellingnews and click "Follow".
 
Featured Tweets
 
How Trauma Transforms & What You Can Do to Help: http://bit.ly/1a3Qt25
 
Free book to help children affected by recent natural disasters: http://bit.ly/1gAj4je
 
What is psychological shadow? http://bit.ly/H7ph6g
 
The Child Placement Principle (Report - PDF): http://bit.ly/19XTnzy
 
Good practices with culturally diverse families in family dispute resolution: http://bit.ly/1dd5JuJ
 
Habits: why we have them and how to break them: http://bit.ly/1bRsiS0
 
Helping Families Enhance Resilience: Creating supportive contexts: http://bit.ly/16oFSOv
 
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Intoquotes
 
"First, have a definite, clear practical ideal; a goal, an objective. Second, have the necessary means to achieve your ends; wisdom, money, materials, and methods. Third, adjust all your means to that end."
 
~ Aristotle
 
Intoseminars
 
Many students of the Diploma of Counselling attend seminars to complete the practical requirements of their course. Seminars provide an ideal opportunity to network with other students and liaise with qualified counselling professionals in conjunction with completing compulsory coursework.
 
Not sure if you need to attend Seminars? Click here for information on Practical Assessments.
 
Below are upcoming seminars available during the remainder of 2013.
 
To register for a seminar, please contact your Student Support Centre.
 
BRISBANE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 07/12
Communication Skills II - 23/11
The Counselling Process - 30/11-01/12
Counselling Therapies I - 16-17/11
Counselling Therapies II - 14-15/12
Case Management - 02-03/11
Counselling Applications - 09/11
 
CDA/B Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 30/11-01/12
Communication Skills I - 07/12
Communication Skills II - 23/11
Counselling Therapies I - 16-17/11
Counselling Therapies II - 14-15/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 24/11
Family Therapy - 08/12
 
GOLD COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 16/11
Communication Skills II - 13/12
The Counselling Process - 25-26/10, 07/12
Counselling Therapies II - 22-23/11
 
CDA/B Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 25-26/10, 07/12
Communication Skills I - 16/11
Communication Skills II - 13/12
Counselling Therapies II - 22-23/11
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 29/11
 
MELBOURNE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 23/11, 14/12
Communication Skills II - 24/11, 15/12
The Counselling Process - 16-17/11 06-07/12
Counselling Therapies I - 30/11-01/12
Counselling Therapies II - 26-27/10, 07-08/12
Case Management - 14-15/12
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 09/11
Counselling Applications - 10/11
 
CDA/B Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 16-17/11 06-07/12
Communication Skills I - 23/11, 14/12
Communication Skills II - 24/11, 15/12
Counselling Therapies I - 30/11-01/12
Counselling Therapies II - 26-27/10, 07-08/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 02/11
Family Therapy - 08/11
Case Management - 14-15/12
 
NORTHERN TERRITORY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 02/11
Communication Skills II - 07/11, 30/11
The Counselling Process - 07-08/12
Counselling Therapies I - 26-27/10
Counselling Therapies II - 14-15/12
Case Management - 23-24/11
Counselling Applications - 09/11
 
CDA/B Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 07-08/12
Communication Skills I - 02/11
Communication Skills II - 07/11, 30/11
Counselling Therapies I - 26-27/10
Counselling Therapies II - 14-15/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 19/10
Family Therapy - 16/11
Counselling Applications - 09/11
 
SOUTH AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 26/10, 14/12
Communication Skills II - 27/10, 15/12
The Counselling Process - 30/11-01/12
Counselling Therapies II - 23-24/11
Case Management - 07-08/12
 
CDA/B Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 30/11-01/12
Communication Skills I - 26/10, 14/12
Communication Skills II - 27/10, 15/12
Counselling Therapies II - 23-24/11
Case Management - 07-08/12
 
SUNSHINE COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 16/11
Communication Skills II - 17/11
Counselling Applications - 02/11
 
CDA/B Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 16/11
Communication Skills II - 17/11
 
SYDNEY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 09/11, 13/12
Communication Skills II - 18/11, 16/12
The Counselling Process - 14-15/11, 06-07/12
Counselling Therapies I - 22-23/11
Counselling Therapies II - 09-10/12
Case Management - 17-18/12
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 25/11
Counselling Applications - 26/11
 
CDA/B Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 14-15/11, 06-07/12
Communication Skills I - 09/11, 13/12
Communication Skills II - 18/11, 16/12
Counselling Therapies I - 22-23/11
Counselling Therapies II - 09-10/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 27/11
Family Therapy - 12/12
Case Management - 17-18/12
 
TASMANIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 03/11
Communication Skills II - 01/12
The Counselling Process - 07-08/12
Counselling Therapies I - 07-08/12
Counselling Therapies II - 14-15/12
Case Management - 23-24/11
Counselling Applications - 10/11
 
CDA/B Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 07-08/12
Communication Skills I - 03/11
Communication Skills II - 01/12
Counselling Therapies I - 07-08/12
Counselling Therapies II - 14-15/12
Family Therapy - 17/11
Case Management - 23-24/11
 
WESTERN AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 26/10, 07/12
Communication Skills II - 27/10, 08/12
The Counselling Process - 02-03/11
Counselling Therapies I - 23-24/11
Counselling Therapies II - 14-15/12
Case Management - 09-10/11
Counselling Applications - 16/11
 
CDA/B Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 02-03/11
Communication Skills I - 26/10, 07/12
Communication Skills II - 27/10, 08/12
Counselling Therapies I - 23-24/11
Counselling Therapies II - 14-15/12
Family Therapy - 17/11
Case Management - 09-10/11
 
Important Note: Advertising of the dates above does not guarantee availability of places in the seminar. Please check availability with the respective Student Support Centre.
 
 
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