In this Issue

Hello!
Intothediploma
Intonews
IntoMHSS
Intocounselling
Intobookstore
Intoarticles
Intodevelopment
Intoconnection
Intotwitter
Intoquotes
Intoseminars

Contact us

Publications

Editor: Sandra Poletto
Email: ezine@aipc.net.au
Website: www.aipc.net.au

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Copyright: 2012 Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors

Hello!
Welcome to Edition 154 of Institute Inbrief. This edition’s featured article outlines how the skill of encouraging can assist others in need of emotional support. This skill can be applied by helping professionals and non-professionals alike. We encourage you to try!
 
Also in this edition:
  • Final Places – Bachelor of Psychological Science & Counselling
  • Upcoming MHSS Workshops
  • Previously Published Articles
  • Professional Development news
  • Blog and Twitter updates
  • Upcoming seminar dates
If you would like to access daily articles & resources, and interact with over 4400 peers, make sure you join our Facebook community today: www.facebook.com/counsellors. It is a great way to stay in touch and share your interest and knowledge in counselling.
 
Enjoy your reading,
 
 
Editor
 
 
Join our community:
 
 
Intothediploma
 
AIPC provides you with Flexible Course Delivery Modes
So YOU set the rules for how and when you learn...
 
AIPC’s accredited and nationally recognised Diploma of Counselling is designed so that you determine the manner and pace you study. You study entirely at your own pace (except of course if you’re receiving a government benefit such as Austudy) and you can start at any time, graduating in only 18-months.
 
Not only can you set the pace you study, you also determine the mode you want to study. You can study Externally (at home with phone and email access to our counselling tutors), In-Class, Online or any combination… all the time fully supported by our huge national team throughout our 8 Student Support Centres.
 
External learning means you can complete your entire course from the comfort of your home (or office, or overseas, or virtually anywhere!). Your course comes complete with fully self-contained, referenced and professionally presented learning materials including 18 individual workbooks and readings. It really is as simple as working through the material and contacting us for support along the way. If you live locally to one of our support centres you can also attend tutorials to provide you with face to face contact if you wish. (This option is ideal if you enjoy working more independently or have a busy schedule).
 
In-Class learning is a classroom forum where you learn with other students from a qualified lecturer. Classes are available in most main cities, at flexible times. In-Class is a great way for you to accelerate your learning, interact with other students and stay highly motivated. (This option is particularly suitable if you enjoy learning in the classroom environment with other students).
 
Online learning allows you to complete your learning entirely via your PC. You still receive all the high quality hardcopy resources (so you don’t miss out on anything!), but you’ll access all your learning materials and complete assessments online.
 
Any Combination. Of course you don’t have to stick with one learning method throughout your studies. You’re welcome to use whichever method suits your needs and desires at the time. You may choose to complete one workbook In-Class, another Online, then Externally. Whatever is most convenient!
 
Learn more - visit www.aipc.net.au/lz today!
 
 
Watch inspirational stories from some of our Graduates: www.aipc.net.au/gradvideo
 
Hear what Employers have to say about AIPC Graduates: www.aipc.net.au/employervids
 
Intonews
 
Final Places – Bachelor of Psychological Science & Counselling
 
Just a few weeks ago we opened up enrolments into the Bachelor of Psychological Science and already the majority of places have been filled. But there are still some places remaining.
 
If you want a secure future doing something you love, then Psychology could be ideal for you.
 
Psychology is one of the most in-demand occupations. It has grown by 77% over the last 5 years, outgrowing all other occupations by almost 600%.
 
Psychology is also one of the most flexible qualifications, offering you rewarding careers in a diverse range of fields such as private practice, HR, human services, public health, market research, organisational development, education, defence services and more.
 
Our unique learning model means you can earn-while-you-learn, so you don’t have to give up work to fit in your studies.
  • Study externally from anywhere in Australia, even overseas.
  • Fund your tuition with Fee-Help.
  • SAVE up to $40,000 on your qualification.
  • Can start with just 1 subject.
  • Online learning portal with access to all study materials, readings and video lectures.
  • Attend residential schools to integrate your learning.
  • Accredited by the Australian Psychology Accreditation Council (APAC).
  • No minimum HSC or OP results required to gain entry.
  • Learn in a friendly, small group environment.
You can submit your obligation free expression of interest (or enrol) in the Bachelor of Psychological Science here: www.aip.edu.au/lz
 
Enrolments and expressions of interest into our Bachelor of Counselling are also open. You can learn more here: www.aipc.edu.au/degree
 
We will hit capacity enrolments for Semester 1 2012 very soon. So if you’re thinking about a career in psychology or counselling, please submit your interest now to avoid missing out.
 
More information on the programs:
 
Bachelor of Psychological Science: www.aip.edu.au/lz
 
Bachelor of Counselling: www.aipc.edu.au/degree
 
IntoMHSS
Research has identified that healthy, educated social support networks are crucial to the mental health of communities. In fact, early intervention through social support is likely the best mechanism a community has to mitigate against the onset of mental illness, and support those in the early stages of escalating mental health problems.
 
Mental Health Social Support (MHSS) trains you to identify the signals of early onset mental illness, support skills and how and when to refer to a professional. MHSS is one of the most crucial life skills that everyone should have, as each and every one of us has a duty of care to our loved ones and colleagues.
 
Upcoming Workshops
 
In this 2-day workshop you will learn:
  • Fundamentals of mental health.
  • How to identify the signs and symptoms of mental health problems.
  • How to help people in the early stages of mental health problems.
  • Introduce you to common mental illnesses such as anxiety disorders, depression, substance abuse disorders, psychotic disorders (schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, etc) and more.
  • Improve your knowledge, understanding and language of mental health.
  • Know where and how to get help.
  • Understand what types of help are effective - and which aren't.
  • Reduce the stigma associated with mental illness.
  • Plus much more.
Dates:
 
February 16th & 17th
March 17th & 18th
March 22nd & 23rd
April 19th & 20th
 
Location: 1/95 Bannister Rd Canning Vale, Western Australia
Trainer: Merrilyn Hughes
Trainer ID: FAC179-8
 
This event is approved for 8 OPD points by the Australian Counselling Association.
 
Cost: $595 (includes workbook and online assessment)
 
How to register: Call (08) 9256 3663 or Email merrilyn@keystonecounselling.com.au
 
Intocounselling
 
Working with Thoughts: The Skill of Encouraging
 
Have you ever heard someone say, “Oh, I won’t be able to do ____. I’m no good at that.”? Or perhaps a person stays angry a very long time at someone because, “She shouldn’t have done that to me”?
Maybe you know someone at work who got fired because they had a poor attitude: complaining, uncooperative, and thinking that any request was too much trouble? Such people are showing that they have the ability to think thoughts – and they are using it in a way that doesn’t help them. This article discusses some of the major ways we can work with cognition -- people’s patterns of thinking and perception – especially when we have a goal of encouraging them.
 
In the early stages of helping, a person needs to be comforted, but as that begins to be achieved through addressing their emotions, other needs may surface. Once the intense (or intensely blocked) emotion of a person is attended to, the person is able to more coherently tell their “story”: that is, their way of understanding the situation that is troubling them.
 
Generally, it will be someone’s reaction to a person, event, or circumstance which is causing them to feel “stuck “, despondent, or otherwise incapacitated. Their reaction usually will involve some form of negative or unrealistic thinking. As helpers, we can assist others to understand where their beliefs, attitudes, and patterns of thinking are limited, maladaptive, or in some way not serving their growth. In such cases, responses directed to their cognition (thoughts) may be the most effective way to encourage them, by helping them change to more productive and accurate thoughts, and thereby envision a more hopeful yet realistic future for themselves.
 
There are several steps of encouragement which anyone can usefully employ, but first, consider these aspects of working with thoughts:
 
Sometimes we say, “I feel that you have a point” when what we actually mean is “I believe that you have a point.” Some people are unable to distinguish between thoughts and feelings, and label some of their thoughts as feelings. This especially happens to people who are very involved with their thoughts. To successfully use cognitive responses with others, we must be able to distinguish thoughts from feelings.
 
The ability to think is what sets us apart as human beings, yet we often use this ability in ways that don’t serve us, such as when we have negative thoughts not grounded in reality, or make ourselves upset with irrational beliefs. If someone you are trying to help is doing this, what skills might you need as a helper to counteract this tendency?
 
Encouraging others by working with their thoughts
 
Before experts understood how to work with people’s thoughts, they generally assumed that, if certain events happened to a person, he or she would respond in predetermined ways. Feelings were understood to be a direct consequence of events, so a person’s quality of life depended on the “luck of the draw”.
 
But then mental health experts noticed that sometimes the same difficult event would occur to several people, yet their emotional responses were different. For the first time, it was understood that events do not directly cause feelings. Rather, events trigger beliefs, which give rise to emotions. This was an exciting insight, because for the first time, people were not viewed as prisoners of the events of their lives. They were seen to hold the keys to their own emotional satisfaction. They might not be able to choose many things that happened to them, but they could choose how they regarded (that is, perceived) events.
 
By being able to change their beliefs surrounding an issue, circumstance, or event, they could change the emotions that would then arise. The overall aim of helping others (emotionally) is to reduce emotional distress, which does not serve them. There is a skill to doing it, however, in that people must be ready to hear the suggestion or possibility for another way of viewing their present situation – or their future possibilities.
 
That capacity increases as people come to feel accepted through the helper’s effective use of comforting. As the need for comforting decreases, the possibility of encouraging increases. Encouraging is achieved through a gradual reshaping of the story being told, to one that offers a realistic hope for the future. Helpers work in large part with the helpee’s thoughts to achieve it.
 
There are three steps of encouragement. At first the helper simply listens to the helpee’s story. Basic active listening skills are important in order to comfort someone, and they continue to feature at the first step of encouragement. The helper’s chief task at this stage is to understand the story – from the helpee’s perspective. The skill of comforting is still needed, as emotions are still present – even strong – and are being expressed as the story begins to unfold. The helper cannot stop offering comfort, but is quietly observing and gathering details that will later feed into helping the helpee to view their situation in a more solution-focused way.
 
While not dropping the use of comforting, the in step two the helper now needs to show that he or she has not only heard and understood the emergent story, but also accepts and respects the perspective from which it is told. This does not imply that the helper agrees with everything that the helpee proposes. It is more that, through the increasing use of the micro-skills such as reflecting meaning and summarising, the helper conveys an acceptance of and respect for the helpee’s current world view, or frame of mind.
 
It is, in essence, the ability to indirectly convey a sense that, “Oh, I see what this means for you, and why these themes are big in your life.” A family systems professor once put it well: “Until you can get why the person’s actions made sense given the options that they thought were open to them, you haven’t genuinely understood or respected them, and you can’t hope to help them change” (R McDermott, personal communication, 1984).
 
Once helpees are comforted through attentive listening and reflecting, and clear that they and their perspective are understood, accepted and respected, a new potential emerges. They can now begin to consider alternatives. With the “edge” taken off their distress and frustration through the airing and deep validation of their concerns, helpees begin to wonder: “Where to from here?” “What might be able to happen differently in the future, such that this issue is resolved, and/or new possibilities open up?”
 
The measure of how well the comforting and encouraging has gone up to this point lies in whether helpees now ask these questions about their preferred (as opposed to present) state with hope rather than despair.
 
Thus at step three of encouragement, the helpee is now ready to participate in building his or her own more hopeful future. The role of the helper now can shift to that of “facilitator of option generating”. Helpee and helper together can engage the creative thinking about potential solutions that will create a new vision for the helpee’s life. This work constitutes the re-shaping of the helpee’s story that needs to happen if change will occur, and it is accomplished primarily through responses to the helpee that are directed at his or her perceptions and patterns of thinking (cognition).
 
To encourage, then, the helper facilitates a helpee’s change in thinking about a particular event, a person, themselves, or their life. Does this mean that you are brainwashing the person? No, it does not, because the helpee always keeps the right and responsibility to choose a particular way of thinking, or choose whether to change the manner of thinking about something.
 
The point about the encouragement stage in the cycle of helping is that, unless effective comforting has preceded it and acceptance and respect have constituted it, helpers will not have built the infrastructure from which to launch a more life-enhancing vision, and individuals being helped will not “see” any hope-filled new choices to choose.  
 
Source: Mental Health Social Support Student Workbook (www.mhss.net.au)  
 
Did you enjoy this article? Then share the feeling and forward it to a friend! Quick reminder: Please send this eZine to all your family and friends so they too can enjoy the benefits. Thank you.
 
Join our community:
 
 
Help those around you suffering mental illness in silence: http://www.mhss.net.au/lz/  
 
Intobookstore
The Institute has a list of recommended textbooks and DVDs which can add great value to your learning journey - and the good news is that you can purchase them very easily. The AIPC bookstore will give YOU:
  • Discounted prices!
  • Easy ordering method!
  • Quality guarantee!
This fortnight's feature is...
 
Name: Putting together Your Own Life: A workbook for you to manage recovery
Authors: Francess Day
AIPC Code: DAY1
AIPC Price: $40.46 (RRP $44.95)
ISBN: 0-9580102-0-X
 
This will provide an invaluable aid for survivors of all forms of trauma who courageously choose to move beyond their pain and suffering in the quest to rebuild their lives. This workbook is a logical extension to assisting trauma survivors.
 
To order this book, simply contact your nearest Student Support Centreor the AIPC Head Office (1800 657 667).
 
Intoarticles
 
How to Manage Anger in Your Relationship
 
Anger is an emotion that although not classified as either good or bad can damage a relationship if it is not understood or dealt with in an appropriate manner. It is only human to get angry now and then at issues that are important to us.
 
If left unaddressed anger can become abusive and may be just one more symptom of a dysfunctional relationship. In this article we are not entering the realms of abusive anger but are exploring how to control anger so it does not escalate and impede the flow of an otherwise healthy relationship.
 
Click here to continue reading this article...
 
 
Emotional Focused Therapy (EFT)
 
Emotional Focused Therapy (EFT) is an integrative style of therapy drawing its theoretical framework from ideas on attachment, existentialism, systemic approaches and Gestalt perspectives (Elliott & Greenberg, 2007). EFT has a specific focus on the couple’s experience of emotions and the concept of wholeness as it relates to interpersonal relationships.
 
The theory underlying this approach suggests that emotion is the fundamental construction of the self and a key determinant of self organization whereby our emotions are considered to be connected to our most essential needs and therefore can alert us of situations that are essential to our wellbeing (Greenberg, 2006).
 
In serving as a prompt to important situations, emotions are also seen to guide us in to actions that try to meet our needs within relevant situations. Therefore, it is thought to be the prevalent emotions within the individual that will guide them towards what changes need to occur. So once the underlying emotions in a conflict are identified, the negative views and behavioural reactions that result from those emotions can be changed for the better.
 
Click here to continue reading this article...
 
Other articles: www.aipc.net.au/articles
 
Intodevelopment
 
Convenient Professional Development
 
Hundreds of counsellors, psychologists, social workers, mental health nurses and allied health professionals already access over 100 Hours of Professional Development online, for less than $1 a day. Now it's your turn.
 
Mental Health Academy (MHA) is the leading provider of professional development education for the mental health industry. MHA provides the largest variety of courses and videos workshops, all conveniently delivered via the internet.
 
With MHA, you no longer have to worry about high costs, proximity and availability, or fitting a workshop around your lifestyle!
 
You can access the huge range of PD, including courses and video workshops, whenever and from wherever you want.
 
Whether you are looking for courses on anxiety and depression, or a video workshop discussing the intricacies of relationship counselling - Mental Health Academy is your gateway to over 100 hours of professional development content.
 
Take a quick look at what Mental Health Academy offers:
  • Over 70 professionally developed courses.
  • On-demand, webstreamed video workshops.
  • Over 100 hours of professional development.
  • Extremely relevant topics.
  • New courses released every month.
  • Video supported training.
  • Online, 24/7 access to resources.
  • Endorsement by multiple Associations, including AASW, ACA and APS.
Begin your journey today. Click on the link below to register for a monthly or annual unlimited membership. As an unlimited member, you can access all MHA courses for less than $1 per day, and receive discounts when purchasing any video workshops:
 
 
 
Intoconnection
Have you visited the new Counselling Connection Blog yet? There are over 500 interesting posts including case studies, profiles, success stories, videos and much more. Make sure you too get connected (and thank you for those who have already submitted comments and suggestions).
 
PD Event: ACA Practice Building Workshops
 
(Only a few places left!)
 
The Australian Counselling Association (ACA) will be running 2x 1-Day Workshops for counsellors and therapists interested in building their counselling businesses.
 
Day 1 (Build a Practice – Basic Foundations) provides the “ins and outs” of starting a practice, looking at issues related to setting up a practice. Day 2 (Marketing Master Class) provides information on how to “get it right the first time” to succeed and grow.
 
Click here to read the full post...
 
Get new Counselling Connection posts delivered by email! Simply visit our FeedBurner subscription page and click the link on the subscription box: http://feeds.feedburner.com/CounsellingConnection.
 
 
Intotwitter
Follow us on Twitter and get the latest and greatest in counselling news. To follow, visit http://twitter.com/counsellingnews and click "Follow".
 
Featured Tweets
 
For those who know our beloved Zahava Starak, here's the latest on her progress: http://www.zahava.com.au/blog/ - she continues to improve :)
 
 
Evidence suggests that embracing forgiveness & gratitude has positive implications for one’s physical & mental health: http://bit.ly/zfzjbS
 
Avoiding an abusive boss can lead to more stress http://bit.ly/xxftCY
 
A reluctant client fails to attend or respond to letters while owing money – is this a reason to break confidentiality? http://www.therapytoday.net/article/show/2840/
 
 
Several brain researchers in Forbes list of 30 scientists aged under 30 who are making a difference: http://www.forbes.com/special-report/2011/30-under30-12/30-under-30-12_science.html
 
Note that you need a Twitter profile to follow a list. If you do not have one yet, visit http://twitter.com to create a free profile today!
 
Tweet Count: 4130
Follower Count: 3200
 
Intoquotes
"Flatter me, and I may not believe you. Criticize me, and I may not like you. Ignore me, and I may not forgive you. Encourage me, and I will not forget you. Love me and I may be forced to love you."
 
~ William Arthur Ward
 
Intoseminars
Many students of the Diploma of Counselling attend seminars to complete the practical requirements of their course. Seminars provide an ideal opportunity to network with other students and liaise with qualified counselling professionals in conjunction with completing compulsory coursework.
 
Not sure if you need to attend Seminars? Click here for information on Practical Assessments.
 
Below are the seminars dates for the first semester of 2012. To register for a seminar, please contact your Student Support Centre.
 
To access the full list of 2012 seminars, visit: www.aipc.net.au/timetables.php.
 
BRISBANE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 03/03, 26/05
Communication Skills II - 04/02, 21/04, 23/06
The Counselling Process - 11/02, 28/04
Counselling Therapies I - 24-25/03, 16-17/06
Counselling Therapies II - 14-15/04
Case Management - 18-19/02, 14-15/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 25/02, 09/06
Counselling Applications - 10/03
 
CDA Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 03/03, 26/05
Communication Skills II - 04/02, 21/04, 23/06
The Counselling Process - 11/02, 28/04
Counselling Therapies I - 24-25/03, 16-17/06
Counselling Therapies II - 14-15/04
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 12/05
Family Therapy - 02/06
Case Management - 18-19/02, 14-15/06
 
GOLD COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 25/02, 19/05
Communication Skills II - 17/03, 16/06
The Counselling Process - 21/04
Counselling Therapies I - 23-24/03
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/05
Case Management - 30-31/03
Counselling Applications - 03/02
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 21/04
Communication Skills I - 25/02, 19/05
Communication Skills II - 17/03, 16/06
Counselling Therapies I - 23-24/03
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 20/4
Family Therapy - 15/06
Case Management - 30-31/03
 
MELBOURNE
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 05/02, 03/03, 14/04, 06/05, 03/06
Communication Skills II - 11/02, 04/03, 15/04, 12/05, 09/06
The Counselling Process - 04/02, 02/03, 01/04, 05/05, 02/06
Counselling Therapies I - 18-19/02, 17-18/03, 21-22/04, 19-20/05, 16-17/06
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/02, 24-25/03, 28-29/04, 26-27/05, 23-24/06
Case Management - 31/03-01/04, 30/06-01/07
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 12/02, 13/05
Counselling Applications - 14/04
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 04/02, 02/03, 01/04, 05/05, 02/06
Communication Skills I - 07/05, 05/02, 03/03, 14/04, 06/05, 03/06
Communication Skills II - 11/02, 04/03, 15/04, 12/05, 09/06
Counselling Therapies I - 18-19/02, 17-18/03, 21-22/04, 19-20/05, 16-17/06
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/02, 24-25/03, 28-29/04, 26-27/05, 23-24/06
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 12/02, 13/05
Family Therapy - 26/02, 10/06
Case Management - 31/03-01/04, 30/06-01/07
 
NORTHERN TERRITORY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 14/04
The Counselling Process - 25/02
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/03
Counselling Therapies II - 28/04, 05/05
Case Management - 11-12/02
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 10/03, 09/06
Counselling Applications - 12/05
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 25/02
Communication Skills I - 14/04
Communication Skills II - 23/07
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/03
Counselling Therapies II - 28/04, 05/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 16/06
Family Therapy - 21/04, 15/09
Case Management - 11-12/02
 
SOUTH AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 04/02, 24/03, 19/05
Communication Skills II - 05/02, 25/03, 20/05
The Counselling Process - 18/02, 01/04, 02/06
Counselling Therapies I - 28-29/04
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/02, 23-24/06
Case Management - 03-04/03
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 05/05
Counselling Applications - 11/02, 16/06
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 18/02, 01/04, 02/06
Communication Skills I - 04/02, 24/03, 19/05
Communication Skills II - 05/02, 25/03, 20/05
Counselling Therapies I - 28-29/04
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/02, 23-24/06
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 06/05
Family Therapy - 12/02, 17/06
Case Management - 03-04/03
 
SUNSHINE COAST
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 19/05
Communication Skills II - 20/05
The Counselling Process - 31/03, 30/06
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/03
Counselling Therapies II - 26-27/05
Case Management - 23-24/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 28/04
Counselling Applications - 14/07
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 31/03, 30/06
Communication Skills I - 19/05
Communication Skills II - 20/05
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/03
Counselling Therapies II - 26-27/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 14/04
Family Therapy - 02/06
Case Management - 23-24/06
 
SYDNEY
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 25/02, 27/03, 28/04, 05/06
Communication Skills II - 29/02, 28/03, 05/05, 18/06
The Counselling Process - 02/02, 18/02, 05/03, 26/03, 21/04, 12/05, 04/06, 21/06
Counselling Therapies I - 02-03/03, 23-24/04, 15-16/06
Counselling Therapies II - 16-17/02, 29-30/03, 17-18/05, 29-30/06
Case Management - 09-10/02, 02-03/04, 22-23/06
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 23/02, 07/05
Counselling Applications - 24/02, 08/05
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 02/02, 18/02, 05/03, 26/03, 21/04, 12/05, 04/06, 21/06
Communication Skills I - 25/02, 27/03, 28/04, 05/06
Communication Skills II - 29/02, 28/03, 05/05, 18/06
Counselling Therapies I - 02-03/03, 23-24/04, 15-16/06
Counselling Therapies II - 16-17/02, 29-30/03, 17-18/05, 29-30/06
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 24/03, 26/05
Family Therapy - 31/03, 01/06
Case Management - 09-10/02, 02-03/04, 22-23/06
 
TASMANIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 25/03, 24/06
Communication Skills II - 05/02, 06/05
The Counselling Process - 19/02, 20/05
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/03
Counselling Therapies II - 29-30/04
Case Management - 14-15/04
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 26/02, 17/06
Counselling Applications - 01/04
 
CDA Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 25/03, 24/06
Communication Skills II - 05/02, 06/05
The Counselling Process - 19/02, 20/05
Counselling Therapies I - 17-18/03
Counselling Therapies II - 29-30/04
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 27/05
Family Therapy - 11/03
Case Management - 14-15/04
 
WESTERN AUSTRALIA
 
DPCD Timetable
 
Communication Skills I - 11/02, 10/03, 28/04, 26/05, 07/06
Communication Skills II - 12/02, 11/03, 29/04, 27/05
The Counselling Process - 18/02, 17/03, 14/04, 12/05
Counselling Therapies I - 21-22/04, 09-10/06
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/02, 05-06/05
Case Management - 19-20/05
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 19/02, 16/06
Counselling Applications - 18/03
 
CDA Timetable
 
The Counselling Process - 18/02, 17/03, 14/04, 12/05
Communication Skills I - 11/02, 10/03, 28/04, 26/05, 07/06
Communication Skills II - 12/02, 11/03, 29/04, 27/05
Counselling Therapies I - 21-22/04, 09-10/06
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/02, 05-06/05
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 03/03, 02/06
Family Therapy - 04/03
Case Management - 19-20/05
 
Important Note: Advertising of the dates above does not guarantee availability of places in the seminar. Please check availability with the respective Student Support Centre.
 
 
 
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Help those around you suffering mental illness in silence: http://www.mhss.net.au/lz/
 

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