In this Issue

Hello!
Intothediploma
Intonews
Intocounselling
Intobookstore
Intoarticles
Intodevelopment
Intoconnection
Intotwitter
Intoquotes
Intoseminars

Contact us

Publications

Editor: Sandra Poletto
Email: ezine@aipc.net.au
Website: www.aipc.net.au

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Copyright: 2012 Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors

Hello!
Welcome to Edition 149 of Institute Inbrief. To some people being alone, well for a short while in any case, is like living in heaven – away from the constant demands of the kids, away from a thoughtless or nagging partner, away from the hustle and bustle of work or city life. Sooner or later though reality kicks in and ironically they pine for the company and closeness of another human being.
 
In this edition’s featured article we provide you with an insight on loneliness and how to cope with it.
 
Also in this edition:
 
-      Breaking News: Bachelor of Psychological Science
-      Previously Published Articles
-      Professional Development news
-      Blog and Twitter updates
-      Upcoming seminar dates
 
If you would like to access daily articles & resources, and interact with over 4100 peers, make sure you join our Facebook community today: www.facebook.com/counsellors. It is a great way to stay in touch and share your interest and knowledge in counselling.
 
Enjoy your reading,
 
Editor
 
 
Join our community:
 
 
Intothediploma
The Diploma of Counselling is supported by a number of optional Advanced Study Majors (ASMs). Advanced Study Majors allow you to study and gain advanced knowledge and skill in the specialised counselling area of your choice.
 
The Advanced Study Major Program involves the completion of one or more optional Advanced Study Majors in addition to the Diploma of Counselling. The Majors provide you with the opportunity to specialise in any of the following highly relevant fields of counselling:
 
-      Abuse Counselling
-      Relationship Counselling and Conflict Resolution
-      Career Counselling
-      Grief and Loss Counselling
-      Child Development and Effective Parenting
-      Workplace Counselling
-      Counselling Clients with Addictions
-      Family Therapy
 
The Majors are specifically designed to provide you with a higher level of practical and theoretical knowledge in a specialised field of counselling. You are able to enrol into an Advanced Study Major at the time of your enrolment into the Diploma of Counselling, or at any subsequent time. The advantage of early enrolment in an Advanced Study Major is that studies can be completed concurrently with your Diploma. There is also no limit on the number of Advanced Study Majors you can undertake.
 
The Advanced Study Majors can be completed by either a home-study or face-to-face mode of study. Studying your ASM via the traditional home-study option follows a similar process as to completing your studies for the Diploma. Students are sent a workbook and readings for the ASM and submit their assessment for marking.
 
Alternatively, students are also able to complete their ASM by attending a workshop. Many students enjoy the interactive, practical workshops because they are a refreshing change from the traditional external study method and provide the opportunity to meet other students. Students also have the flexibility to change into this mode of study even after selecting the home-study option.
 
Click here for more information about each ASM.
 
For further information about the Diploma, please contact your closest Student Support Centre or visit www.aipc.net.au/lz.
 
Intonews
 
Breaking News – Bachelor of Psychological Science
 
We are extremely proud to announce that from Semester 1 next year we’re delivering a Bachelor of Psychological Science.
 
It has taken us a few years of diligent hard work to get to this point. We’re one of only two non-university providers in the country delivering a Bachelor degree in Psychology. So it’s an epic achievement and a significant development for the discipline of Psychology in Australia.
 
Our program maintains all the hallmarks that make AIPC unique, including:
 
-      External delivery. The Bachelor of Psychological Science can be studied externally so you can fit learning around your life.
-      Accredited by the Australian Psychology Accreditation Council – same as all universities.
-      FEE-HELP available. Enrol with no money down utilising the government fee-help loan scheme.
-      CREDIT for prior learning. You can receive up to a full year credit for prior learning.
-      Flexible and supported. We provide you with a truly enjoyable, flexible and supported learning environment.
-      Cost effective. Save up to $40,000 on a comparable degree from university.
-      Study part of full time. You can start with just one subject!
 
We’re now opening the doors for enrolments.
 
Our 2012 student cohort is strictly limited to 70 students. And we must accept applications on a first-in basis. You can learn more and express your interest here: www.aip.edu.au/lz  
 
BACHELOR OF COUNSELLING
 
We are also accepting enrolments and expressions of interest into our Bachelor of Counselling. You can learn more and express your interest in the Bachelor of Counselling here:
 
 
Note - The interest in both the Bachelor of Psychological Science and Counselling has been extraordinary. If you’re contemplating attaining a Degree in these fields we strongly suggest you submit your OBLIGATION FREE expression of interest immediately.
 
Bachelor of Psychological Science: www.aip.edu.au/lz
 
Bachelor of Counselling: www.aipc.edu.au/degree
 
Intocounselling
 
An Insight into Loneliness
 
To some people being alone, well for a short while in any case, is like living in heaven – away from the constant demands of the kids, away from a thoughtless or nagging partner, away from the hustle and bustle of work or city life. Sooner or later though reality kicks in and ironically they pine for the company and closeness of another human being.
 
Loneliness on the other hand, when prolonged, can be like a lingering canker, slowly eating away at your mind and your life – leaving nothing but a sad and empty shell of a person with little to live for save an existence with little meaning or purpose. Loneliness may be chosen, but usually occurs to people unwittingly or because of unfortunate circumstances. The loss or death of a spouse or a child can lead to terrible loneliness. People can still live with other people in a house, be married and yet in their mind be totally isolated and feeling lonely or alone. They may have nothing in common with a person they live with, or they may be caring for an elderly partner who is sick, with a stroke for example, and who is unable to speak or respond.
 
Humans are social beings and rely on each other not just for survival but for enjoyment and pleasure in life. Abraham Maslow (1987) developed in the 1950’s what is now well known as the ‘Hierarchy of Human Needs’ model. This model identified the most basic needs of people (such as food, clothing shelter, water) at the bottom of a triangle graduating upwards in the triangle with more emotional and cognitive needs leading to the highest level or apex of individual human satisfaction called ‘Self Actualisation’.
 
Of course other critical social, feminist and postmodernist theorists and researchers have identified broader aspects of human experience since that time; however Maslow’s model does serve to demonstrate how individual human needs require education, social support and networks. For example, an infant would simply be unable to survive without a more mature human or humans (like parents) to care and nurture it. Humans have a sophisticated language in order to communicate, and rely on one another throughout the lifespan for intimacy, support, knowledge, understanding and guidance.
 
Loneliness, when extreme, can lead to depression and suicide if help is not provided. Loneliness is to some extent part of being a normal human being. For example at times loneliness may be necessary for reflecting on life and aiding emotional healing in the grieving process. Many spiritual leaders have experienced intense loneliness (not just being alone) as part of growing stronger emotionally and spiritually.
 
So loneliness is not always negative and pathological. Loneliness is not specific to any age group or gender, so anyone in the right (or wrong) circumstances can be affected. Loneliness can be short in nature or linger on for many years. Loneliness can be bureaucratised and many lonely elder people live out their lives almost alone with no-one to talk to each and every day in some aged care facilities. Many older people also live very lonely lives living alone in populated suburbs and sparse rural and remote communities or farms.
 
Loneliness can still occur for a person surrounded by many other people in their lives. People can still feel isolated and lonely despite being socially active in sport, music, business and so on. Loneliness is a state of mind, not necessarily being isolated from other people. A person may have much more in common with some people than other people and if there is a mismatch of interests, culture, language, intelligence, social skills or abilities then that person could feel detached, alienated or marginalised and become lonely and depressed if the situation is prolonged.
 
Severe loneliness and depression often seem to be fateful partners. Research findings indicate that social conditions can lead to people feeling lonely and depressed (Herzog & Markus, 1991). Factors that can lead to this state include: unemployment; financial hardship; rural droughts, bushfires or floods that devastate peoples’ lives and livelihoods and isolate communities; loss of partner or loved one; lack of self-esteem – unable or scared to make relationships with others; physical illness (e.g., HIV AIDS, arthritis or back pain) or incapacitation or debilitation; problems of ageing (strokes, dementia); mental illnesses (especially suffering from phobias, anxiety and panic attacks) or disabilities in which sufferers are discriminated against; new mothers or parents trying to cope with a demanding new baby; people who are highly stressed or who move regularly from place to place without making friends; etc.
 
Theory and Facts
 
According to Michael Flood’s report (2005) titled ‘Loneliness in Australia’, the following facts are relevant about loneliness: Men of all ages are more likely to suffer from loneliness; among men between the ages of 25-44 and who live alone, they report significantly lower levels of support and friendship than men who live with others. Interestingly the same is not the case for women; men rely on their wives or partners for social and emotional needs. Women generally have a broader social network to draw upon to meet their needs.
 
Single mothers with children report the highest levels of loneliness among women respondents; divorced or separated men experience the same levels of loneliness as other men who live alone; divorced or separated women particularly by one year afterwards, indicate the same levels of loneliness as other women who have not been through separation or divorce. Women have greater social and emotional networks and contacts than men.
 
Men rely much more on paid employment as a source to provide personal support and friendship. As paid employment increases for men, so does personal support and friendships; women who live alone do find increased support and friendship through work regardless of the amount of hours worked; both men and women, single or otherwise, experience increased loneliness during financial hardship and if they lose their paid employment.
 
About one third of men living alone stated that they ‘often feel very lonely’; about one quarter of lone fathers with children stated they ‘often feel very lonely’; 13% of men in childless couple families also stated they ‘often feel very lonely’; this pattern of ‘often feeling very lonely’ is also similar in women. Men who live alone are often confronted by unsociable neighbourhoods (low level of neighbourhood cooperation and interaction) and they have poorer physical, emotional and mental health.
 
Below are some of the risk factors and protective factors that are related to loneliness and depression as identified in the literature.
 
Risk factors (environmental and social):
 
-      Social disadvantage (poverty, unemployment, member of marginalised group (e.g., gay and lesbian communities; single parents)
-      Family discord (relationship break-up, conflict, poor parenting practices)
-      Parental mental illness
-      Child abuse (physical/sexual, neglect)
-      Exposure to adverse life events (bereavements, family separation, trauma, family illness)
-      Caring for someone with a chronic physical or mental disorder
-      For older adults, being in residential care
 
Protective factors (environmental and social):
 
-      Good interpersonal relationships (supportive relationship with at least one person/parent, perceived social support)
-      Community tolerance of difference and diversity
-      Family cohesion (positive parent-child relations
-      Social connectedness
-      Academic/sporting achievements
 
Risk factors (biological and psychological):
 
-      Parental mental disorder and family history of depression
-      Being a female adolescent (more recently a male)
-      High trait anxiety and pre-existing anxiety disorders, substance abuse, conduct disorder
-      Temperament – reacting negatively to stressors, and personality trait of neuroticism
-      Negative thought patterns (pessimism, learned helplessness)
-      Avoidant coping style
 
Protective factors (biological and psychological):
 
-      Easy-going temperament
-      Optimistic thought patterns
-      Effective coping skills repertoire (social skills, problem-solving skills)
 
Loneliness, depression and suicide are often associated with one another. The statistics in Australia and elsewhere are interesting as there appears to be a degree of ambiguity between data for depression and data for suicides. It is interesting to note that women over 18 years report symptoms of depression far more than men. Yet episodes of suicide in all age groups from early adolescence are far higher in men than in women.
 
Why is this so? It is suggested that men do not seek medical help nearly as much as women do and therefore episodes of men who may well be depressed but not seeking help is not reported. This is especially the case in rural and remote communities where men typically avoid seeking health care interventions. It may well be that men do suffer depression as much or maybe more than women but all we can do at this stage is speculate.
 
Identifying Symptoms
 
For most people wanting to know more about the general symptoms of loneliness and depression the following is important information. Loneliness symptoms according to Michael Flood 2005 citing his Report on Loneliness in Australia may include:
 
-      Feelings of loss and despair
-      Feelings of helplessness (e.g., with single male parents ‘There is no-one to help me when I need support and friendship’ or ‘...to cheer me up when I’m down’)
-      Feelings of isolation and alienation or marginalisation from other people.
 
Many men and women, especially from poor socio-economic backgrounds, those who are single parents and under financial strain or hardship suffer loneliness and have symptoms typical of depression. So it is worth exploring depression in more detail.
 
According to ‘Spot, Seek, Solve – Depression’ (a mental health promotion initiative of Hunter New England Area Health Services, 2001-2006), symptoms of depression (which may directly relate to loneliness) may include feeling: down; worthless; hopeless; angry; tired and irritable; suicidal.
 
And/or finding it hard to: sleep (not enough sleep, sleeping too much and/or waking up early in the morning); concentrate; control your moods; enjoy the things you usually like; eat regularly.
 
Other symptoms may include: having aches and pains for no apparent reason; being overly pessimistic; losing interest in other people and not caring what happens; having a sense of failure or guilt; loss of outward affection and going off sex.
 
Characteristics of Negative Thoughts
 
-      AUTOMATIC: They seem to happen without any effort on your part – they come ‘out of the blue’.
-      UNHELPFUL: They keep you depressed, make it difficult to change and stop you getting what you want out of life.
-      PLAUSIBLE: You accept them as facts and it does not occur to you to question them.
-      INVOLUNTARY: You do not choose to have them and they can be very difficult to switch off.
-      DISTORTED: They do not fit with the facts.
 
It is worth noting that these negative thoughts are most probably incorrect and illogical. A negative thought, according to The Clinical Psychology Service of Northampton Healthcare Community (NHS) Trust, 2003, Coping With Depression, Booklets 3 (Negative Thoughts), revised 09/12/03, pp.5-6, has two main elements: 1/ A sad mood immediately – it makes you feel worse; 2/ Less likelihood of taking positive action in the future – you just ‘give up’ before you try anything to put the situation right.
 
The Clinical Psychology Service of Northampton Healthcare Community (NHS) Trust, 2003, Coping with Depression, Booklets 3 (Negative Thoughts), revised 09/12/03, p.5, outlines another very interesting table titled Types of Thinking Errors in Depression and it is recited in full here as follows:
 
Types of Thinking Error in Depression
 
Jumping to a conclusion without any real evidence: You ring a friend. They are abrupt. You assume they no longer like you. Could be they have a headache or are watching TV.
 
Focusing on a detail taken out of context: Someone at work finds a minor mistake in your work. You think ‘I made a total mess of that’.
 
Overgeneralising: A long relationship ends. You overgeneralise ‘I will never find anyone else’.
 
Placing events in one of two ‘black and white’ categories with nothing in between: People are either totally for me or totally against me.
 
Imagining catastrophes: You look at some peeling wallpaper in your house. ‘The place is falling apart. I can’t stay here’.
 
Ignoring the good aspects of situations: Your children complain that their mash potato is lumpy. You think ‘I can’t even cook simple meals now’ ignoring that they said everything else was fine.
 
Loneliness can be debilitating and can lead to problems such as depression, anxiety and even suicide. Indeed loneliness, depression and anxiety often go hand in hand. It is important to recognise one’s strengths and resources such as friends, relatives, skills, knowledge and so on so that they can be harnessed to overcome feelings of self-doubt and negativity about oneself.
 
 
Further information on Loneliness: Click here to download our Life Effectiveness Guide “Coping with Loneliness”. The guide includes case examples along with exercises, strategies and skills to address loneliness and prevent depression.
 
 
Did you enjoy this article? Then share the feeling and forward it to a friend! Quick reminder: Please send this eZine to all your family and friends so they too can enjoy the benefits. Thank you.
 
Join our community:
 
 
Intobookstore
The Institute has a list of recommended textbooks and DVDs which can add great value to your learning journey - and the good news is that you can purchase them very easily. The AIPC bookstore will give YOU:
 
-      Discounted prices!
-      Easy ordering method!
-      Quality guarantee!
 
This fortnight's feature is...
 
Name: Private Practice Psychology
Authors: Richard Kasperczyk, Dr Ronald Francis
AIPC Code: KASPER
AIPC Price: $62.96 (RRP $69.95)
ISBN: 978-185-433-3438
 
A no-nonsense guide to the small business fundamentals of establishing and running a private practice in psychology. Written for students who contemplate working in private practice to the experienced practitioner, this book will take you through the whole journey of private practice.
 
To order this book, simply contact your nearest Student Support Centre or the AIPC Head Office (1800 657 667).
 
Intoarticles
 
The Role of Boundaries in Counselling
 
Boundaries are a crucial aspect of any effective client-counsellor relationship. They set the structure for the relationship and provide a consistent framework for the counselling process.
 
Some boundary lines are clear. Most counsellors would acknowledge that it is ethically problematic, for example, to counsel your ex-partner because the pre-existing relationship impairs objectivity and serves to undermine the professional relationship.
 
Whilst situations such as these are clearly problematic, outside of such elementary confines are numerous situations where the delineation of boundaries is less clear. These situations fall outside of the formal code of ethics and lie instead in an ambiguous grey area.
 
Click here to continue reading this article...
 
 
Teaching Clients to Become Assertive
 
Assertiveness is the ability to express one’s feelings, opinions, beliefs and needs directly, openly and honestly, assert one’s rights whilst respecting the feelings and rights of another (Lloyd, 1998). Non-assertive individuals may be passive, aggressive or passive-aggressive.
 
Assertive individuals have fewer conflicts in their dealings with others, which translates into less stress in their lives. It also results in stronger, more supportive relationships which can assist clients with stress management (Downing, 1995).
 
Passive clients avoid conflict by not communicating their needs and feelings, but these behaviours can damage relationships over time. They can feel like victims, avoiding confrontation. The other party doesn’t know there’s a problem until the formerly passive individual reacts with explosion (Stress, 2006).
 
Click here to continue reading this article...
 
Other articles: www.aipc.net.au/articles
 
Intodevelopment
 
Convenient Professional Development
 
Hundreds of counsellors, psychologists, social workers, mental health nurses and allied health professionals already access over 100 Hours of Professional Development online, for less than $1 a day. Now it's your turn.
 
Mental Health Academy (MHA) is the leading provider of professional development education for the mental health industry. MHA provides the largest variety of courses and videos workshops, all conveniently delivered via the internet.
 
With MHA, you no longer have to worry about high costs, proximity and availability, or fitting a workshop around your lifestyle!
 
You can access the huge range of PD, including courses and video workshops, whenever and from wherever you want.
 
Whether you are looking for courses on anxiety and depression, or a video workshop discussing the intricacies of relationship counselling - Mental Health Academy is your gateway to over 100 hours of professional development content.
 
Take a quick look at what Mental Health Academy offers:
 
-      Over 70 professionally developed courses.
-      On-demand, webstreamed video workshops.
-      Over 100 hours of professional development.
-      Extremely relevant topics.
-      New courses released every month.
-      Video supported training.
-      Online, 24/7 access to resources.
-      Endorsement by multiple Associations, including AASW, ACA and APS.
 
Begin your journey today. Click on the link below to register for a monthly or annual unlimited membership. As an unlimited member, you can access all MHA courses for less than $1 per day, and receive discounts when purchasing any video workshops:
 
 
 
Intoconnection
Have you visited the new Counselling Connection Blog yet? There are over 500 interesting posts including case studies, profiles, success stories, videos and much more. Make sure you too get connected (and thank you for those who have already submitted comments and suggestions).
 
Mental Health Week – Featured Posts
 
Last week we published 4 especially ‘themed’ posts to promote mental health awareness during Mental Health Week. Each post discussed an important mental health-related topic and included resources for the community (individuals) and for professionals. Below are links to these posts.
 
 
 
 
 
Get new Counselling Connection posts delivered by email! Simply visit our FeedBurner subscription page and click the link on the subscription box: http://feeds.feedburner.com/CounsellingConnection.
 
 
Intotwitter
Follow us on Twitter and get the latest and greatest in counselling news. To follow, visit http://twitter.com/counsellingnews and click "Follow".
 
Featured Tweets
 
Developmental counseling and therapy: an effective approach to understanding and counseling children: http://bit.ly/qXdp58
 
 
Psychological prevention and intervention strategies for body dissatisfaction and disordered eating: http://www.psychology.org.au/Content.aspx?ID=3802
 
Richard Seymour: How beauty feels (TED): http://www.ted.com/talks/richard_seymour_how_beauty_feels.html
 
Evidence Points to Potential Roles for Cognitive Rehabilitation Therapy in Treating Traumatic Brain Injury: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/10/111011132150.htm
 
Parent guide to helping children manage conflict, aggression and bullying: http://www.psychology.org.au/publications/tip_sheets/bullying/
 
 
Note that you need a Twitter profile to follow a list. If you do not have one yet, visit http://twitter.com to create a free profile today!
 
Tweet Count: 2938
Follower Count: 3675
 
Intoquotes
"You can make more friends in two months by becoming interested in other people than you can in two years by trying to get other people interested in you."
 
~ Dale Carnegie
 
Intoseminars
Many students of the Diploma of Counselling attend seminars to complete the practical requirements of their course. Seminars provide an ideal opportunity to network with other students and liaise with qualified counselling professionals in conjunction with completing compulsory coursework.
 
Below are upcoming seminars dates in 2011. To register for a seminar, please contact your Student Support Centre.
 
To access the full list, visit: www.aipc.net.au/timetables.php.
 
Diploma of Counselling (CDA) Timetable
 
Northern Territory
The Counselling Process - 04/12
Communication Skills I - 12/11
Communication Skills II - 03/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 05/11
Case Management - 26-27/11
 
South Australia
The Counselling Process - 26/11
Communication Skills I - 03/12
Communication Skills II - 04/12
Counselling Therapies I - 12-13/11
Counselling Therapies II - 10-11/12
Family Therapy - 27/11
Case Management - 19-20/11
 
Sydney
The Counselling Process - 31/10, 26/11, 12/12
Communication Skills I - 21/10, 18/11, 14/12
Communication Skills II - 30/11
Counselling Therapies I - 27-28/10, 01-02/12
Counselling Therapies II - 14-15/11
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 21/11
Family Therapy - 13/12
Case Management - 24-25/11
 
Western Australia
The Counselling Process - 05/11, 03/12
Communication Skills I - 29/10, 10/12
Communication Skills II - 30/10, 11/12
Counselling Therapies I - 26-27/11
Counselling Therapies II - 17-18/12
Family Therapy - 04/12
Case Management - 12-13/11
 
Brisbane
The Counselling Process - 27/11
Communication Skills I - 22/10, 03/12
Communication Skills II - 05/11
Counselling Therapies II - 29-30/10
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 19/11
Family Therapy - 17/12
Case Management - 12-13/11
 
Tasmania
The Counselling Process - 27/11
Communication Skills I - 18/12
Communication Skills II - 06/11
Counselling Therapies I - 19-20/11
Counselling Therapies II - 03-04/12
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 11/12
Case Management - 12-13/11
 
Melbourne
The Counselling Process - 29/10, 19/11, 16/12
Communication Skills I - 29/10, 12/11, 03/12
Communication Skills II - 30/10, 13/11, 20/11, 04/12
Counselling Therapies I - 26-27/11, 10-11/12
Counselling Therapies II - 22-23/10, 19-20/11, 17-18/12
Case Management - 05-06/11
 
Sunshine Coast
Communication Skills I - 29/10
Communication Skills II - 30/10
Case Management - 05-06/11
 
Gold Coast
The Counselling Process - 22/10, 03/12
Communication Skills I - 05/11
Communication Skills II - 17/12
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/11
Legal & Ethical Frameworks - 21/10
 
Diploma of Professional Counselling (DPCD) Timetable
 
Northern Territory
Communication Skills I - 12/11
Communication Skills II - 03/12
The Counselling Process - 04/12
Counselling Therapies I - 19-20/11
Counselling Therapies II - 10-11/12
Case Management - 26-27/11
Counselling Applications - 29/10
 
South Australia
Communication Skills I - 03/12
Communication Skills II - 04/12
The Counselling Process - 26/11
Counselling Therapies I - 12-13/11
Counselling Therapies II - 10-11/12
Case Management - 29-20/11
 
Sydney
Communication Skills I - 21/10, 18/11, 14/12
Communication Skills II - 30/11
The Counselling Process - 31/10, 26/11, 12/12
Counselling Therapies I - 27-28/10, 01-02/12
Counselling Therapies II - 14-15/11
Case Management - 24-25/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 05/12
Counselling Applications - 09/12
 
Western Australia
Communication Skills I - 29/10, 10/12
Communication Skills II - 30/10, 11/12
The Counselling Process - 05/11, 03/12
Counselling Therapies I - 26-27/11
Counselling Therapies II - 17-18/12
Case Management - 12-13/11
Counselling Applications - 06/11
 
Brisbane
Communication Skills I - 22/10, 03/12
Communication Skills II - 05/11
The Counselling Process - 27/11
Counselling Therapies I - 10-11/12
Case Management - 12-13/11
Counselling Applications - 18/12
 
Tasmania
Communication Skills I - 18/12
Communication Skills II - 06/11
The Counselling Process - 27/11
Case Management - 12-13/11
Advanced Counselling Techniques - 23/10
Counselling Applications - 30/10
 
Melbourne
Communication Skills I - 29/10, 12/11, 03/12
Communication Skills II - 30/10, 13/11, 20/11, 04/12
The Counselling Process - 29/10, 19/11, 19/12, 16/12
Counselling Therapies I - 26-27/11, 10-11/12
Counselling Therapies II - 22-23/10, 19-20/11, 17-18/12
Case Management - 05-06/11
 
Sunshine Coast
Communication Skills I - 29/10
Communication Skills II - 30/10
Case Management - 05-06/11
Counselling Applications - 22/10
 
Gold Coast
 
Communication Skills I - 05/11
Communication Skills II - 17/12
The Counselling Process - 22/10, 03/12
Counselling Therapies II - 25-26/11
 
 
Important Note: Advertising of the dates above does not guarantee availability of places in the seminar. Please check availability with the respective Student Support Centre.
 
 
 
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